Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Bronchiectasis increases mortality risk in moderate-to-severe COPD

08.02.2013
Bronchiectasis is independently associated with an increased mortality risk in patients with moderate-to-severe COPD, according to a new study from researchers in Spain.

Bronchiectasis, a permanent and progressive dilation of the lung's airways, is common in COPD patients and is associated with longer and more intense exacerbations, more frequent bacterial colonization of the bronchial mucosa, and a greater degree of functional impairment.

"As COPD patients with bronchiectasis have an increased incidence of other known prognostic factors, we hypothesized that bronchiectasis itself would also have prognostic value," said lead author Miguel Ángel Martínez-García, MD, of La Fe University and Polytechnic Hospital in Valencia, Spain. "We found that the presence and severity of bronchiectasis were associated with an increase in all-cause mortality in patients with moderate-to-severe COPD, independent of other known risk factors, including pulmonary function and other comorbidities."

The findings were published online ahead of print publication in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

The multicenter prospective observational study included 201 consecutive patients with moderate-to-severe COPD; 115 of them (57.2%) had bronchiectasis, which was diagnosed by high-resolution computed tomography (CT) scan of the chest. COPD severity was classified according to Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) criteria.

During a median 48 months of follow-up, there were 51 deaths, including 43 among the patients with bronchiectasis. In a multivariate analysis adjusted for dyspnea, body mass index, presence of potentially pathogenic microorganisms in sputum,comorbidities, number of severe exacerbations and other potentially confounding factors, bronchiectasis was associated with a significantly increased risk of all-cause mortality (hazard ratio 2.54, 95%CI, 1.16-5.56; p=0.02).Age, Charlson Index, and post-bronchodilator ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 second were also shown to have prognostic value.

The study had a few limitations, including that some variables that have been shown to predict mortality in COPD were not included in the analysis and exact measurement of the size of the bacterial load in sputum samples was not possible.

"If the prognostic value of bronchiectasis in patients with moderate-to-severe COPD that we found is confirmed in further and larger studies, it would have an important clinical impact," said Dr. Martínez-García, "Bronchiectasis can be reliably diagnosed with high-resolution CT scanning, and effective treatments are available, potentially reducing the risk of mortality in patients with COPD."

About the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine:

With an impact factor of 11.080, the AJRRCM is a peer-reviewed journal published by the American Thoracic Society. It aims to publish the most innovative science and the highest quality reviews, practice guidelines and statements in the pulmonary, critical care and sleep-related fields.

Founded in 1905, the American Thoracic Society is the world's leading medical association dedicated to advancing pulmonary, critical care and sleep medicine. The Society's 15,000 members prevent and fight respiratory disease around the globe through research, education, patient care and advocacy.

Nathaniel Dunford | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.thoracic.org

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht New evidence: How amino acid cysteine combats Huntington's disease
27.07.2016 | Johns Hopkins Medicine

nachricht Cord blood outperforms matched, unrelated donor in bone marrow transplant
27.07.2016 | University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Self-assembling nano inks form conductive and transparent grids during imprint

Transparent electronics devices are present in today’s thin film displays, solar cells, and touchscreens. The future will bring flexible versions of such devices. Their production requires printable materials that are transparent and remain highly conductive even when deformed. Researchers at INM – Leibniz Institute for New Materials have combined a new self-assembling nano ink with an imprint process to create flexible conductive grids with a resolution below one micrometer.

To print the grids, an ink of gold nanowires is applied to a substrate. A structured stamp is pressed on the substrate and forces the ink into a pattern. “The...

Im Focus: The Glowing Brain

A new Fraunhofer MEVIS method conveys medical interrelationships quickly and intuitively with innovative visualization technology

On the monitor, a brain spins slowly and can be examined from every angle. Suddenly, some sections start glowing, first on the side and then the entire back of...

Im Focus: Newly discovered material property may lead to high temp superconductivity

Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Ames Laboratory have discovered an unusual property of purple bronze that may point to new ways to achieve high temperature superconductivity.

While studying purple bronze, a molybdenum oxide, researchers discovered an unconventional charge density wave on its surface.

Im Focus: Mapping electromagnetic waveforms

Munich Physicists have developed a novel electron microscope that can visualize electromagnetic fields oscillating at frequencies of billions of cycles per second.

Temporally varying electromagnetic fields are the driving force behind the whole of electronics. Their polarities can change at mind-bogglingly fast rates, and...

Im Focus: Continental tug-of-war - until the rope snaps

Breakup of continents with two speed: Continents initially stretch very slowly along the future splitting zone, but then move apart very quickly before the onset of rupture. The final speed can be up to 20 times faster than in the first, slow extension phase.phases

Present-day continents were shaped hundreds of millions of years ago as the supercontinent Pangaea broke apart. Derived from Pangaea’s main fragments Gondwana...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

GROWING IN CITIES - Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Urban Gardening

15.07.2016 | Event News

SIGGRAPH2016 Computer Graphics Interactive Techniques, 24-28 July, Anaheim, California

15.07.2016 | Event News

Partner countries of FAIR accelerator meet in Darmstadt and approve developments

11.07.2016 | Event News

 
Latest News

World first demo of labyrinth magnetic-domain-optical Q-switched laser

28.07.2016 | Information Technology

New material could advance superconductivity

28.07.2016 | Materials Sciences

CO2 can be stored underground for 10 times the length needed to avoid climatic impact

28.07.2016 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>