Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:


Blood type A may predispose to some rotavirus infections

Whether you become infected by some strains of rotavirus may depend on your blood type.

Some strains of rotavirus find their way into the cells of the gastrointestinal tract by recognizing antigens associated with the type A blood group, a finding that represents a new paradigm in understanding how this gut pathogen infects humans, said Baylor College of Medicine researchers in an online report in the journal Nature.

Rotavirus is a major intestinal pathogen that is the leading cause of severe dehydration and diarrhea in infants around the world. An estimated 500,000 people worldwide die from the infection annually.

The structure of a key part of a strain of the virus known as P[14] provides a clue to how the virus infects human cells, said Dr. B. V. Venkataram Prasad, professor of biochemistry and molecular biology at BCM and the report's corresponding author. In strains of rotavirus that infect animals, the top of a spike on the virus attaches to the cell via a glycan (one of many sugars linked together to form complex branched-chain structures) with a terminal molecule of sialic acid. The same did not appear to be true of virus strains that infect humans, and scientists believed the human rotavirus strains were bound to glycans with an internal sialic acid molecule, but they did not know how this occurs.

"We wondered how this genotype of rotavirus recognized a cellular glycan," said Prasad. "With colleagues at Emory (University School of Medicine), we did a glycan array analysis to see which glycans interacted with the top of the virus spike (called VP8*)."

The only type of glycan that interacted with VP8* was type A histo-blood group antigen, he said.

"That was surprising," he said. "We thought it had to be a glycan with sialic acid."

The histo-blood group antigen A does not have sialic acid.

However, when Dr. Liya Hu, a post-doctoral researcher in Prasad's laboratory, determined the structure of the VP8* domain, she found that the type A glycan bound to the rotavirus spike protein at the same place as the sialic acid would have in an animal rotavirus. Histo-blood group antigens are known to promote binding of norovirus and Helicobacter pylori cells to intestinal cells, but this had never been demonstrated in rotavirus.

Hu's structural study, using crystallography, showed subtle changes in the structure of the VP8* domain of the virus that allowed it to use the histo-blood group antigen A as a receptor.

In collaboration with the laboratory of Dr. Mary Estes, professor of molecular virology and microbiology at BCM, Prasad and his colleagues found that laboratory cells modified to express the histo-blood group antigen A were easily infected by this rotavirus strain. Cells that lacked this antigen were not easily infected.

An antibody to the histo-blood group antigen A blocked infection by the virus into human intestinal cells in culture.

"No one expected this," said Prasad. "Is there an emerging theme here with these intestinal pathogens? Do other viruses use these blood group antigens as a door to enter the cell?"

Further studies identified a second rotavirus strain P[9] that uses the histo-blood group antigen as a receptor, he said.

"The question now is do different strains use other histo-blood group antigens in this way?" he said.

Estes said, "These studies are significant because they provide a novel mechanism of transmission for a rotavirus strain that jumps from ungulates (such as horses, zebras, pigs, sheep) into humans."

The authors found humans infected with the P[14] strain had type A blood, but more studies are needed to confirm the connection.

Larger populations of infected individuals need to be studied to determine if there is a clear association of these virus strains using histo-blood group antigens as a receptor," they said.

This finding raises questions about why humans developed different blood groups, Prasad said. It may be an evolutionary change that occurred after the pathogen first invaded human cells.

Others who took part in this work include Sue E. Crawford, Rita Czako and Nicolas W Cortes-Penfield of BCM, David F. Smith of Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta and Jacques Le Pendu of NSERM, Le Centre national de la recherche scientifique and Le Université de Nantes in France.

Funding for this work came from the National Institutes of Health and the Robert Welch Foundation.

Dr. Estes holds the Cullen Foundation Endowed Chair and director of the Texas Medical Center Digestive Diseases Center.

Dr. Prasad holds the Alvin Romansky Chair in Biochemistry

Graciela Gutierrez | EurekAlert!
Further information:

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht NIH scientists describe potential antibody treatment for multidrug-resistant K. pneumoniae
14.03.2018 | NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

nachricht Researchers identify key step in viral replication
13.03.2018 | University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Researchers at Fraunhofer monitor re-entry of Chinese space station Tiangong-1

In just a few weeks from now, the Chinese space station Tiangong-1 will re-enter the Earth's atmosphere where it will to a large extent burn up. It is possible that some debris will reach the Earth's surface. Tiangong-1 is orbiting the Earth uncontrolled at a speed of approx. 29,000 km/h.Currently the prognosis relating to the time of impact currently lies within a window of several days. The scientists at Fraunhofer FHR have already been monitoring Tiangong-1 for a number of weeks with their TIRA system, one of the most powerful space observation radars in the world, with a view to supporting the German Space Situational Awareness Center and the ESA with their re-entry forecasts.

Following the loss of radio contact with Tiangong-1 in 2016 and due to the low orbital height, it is now inevitable that the Chinese space station will...

Im Focus: Alliance „OLED Licht Forum“ – Key partner for OLED lighting solutions

Fraunhofer Institute for Organic Electronics, Electron Beam and Plasma Technology FEP, provider of research and development services for OLED lighting solutions, announces the founding of the “OLED Licht Forum” and presents latest OLED design and lighting solutions during light+building, from March 18th – 23rd, 2018 in Frankfurt a.M./Germany, at booth no. F91 in Hall 4.0.

They are united in their passion for OLED (organic light emitting diodes) lighting with all of its unique facets and application possibilities. Thus experts in...

Im Focus: Mars' oceans formed early, possibly aided by massive volcanic eruptions

Oceans formed before Tharsis and evolved together, shaping climate history of Mars

A new scenario seeking to explain how Mars' putative oceans came and went over the last 4 billion years implies that the oceans formed several hundred million...

Im Focus: Tiny implants for cells are functional in vivo

For the first time, an interdisciplinary team from the University of Basel has succeeded in integrating artificial organelles into the cells of live zebrafish embryos. This innovative approach using artificial organelles as cellular implants offers new potential in treating a range of diseases, as the authors report in an article published in Nature Communications.

In the cells of higher organisms, organelles such as the nucleus or mitochondria perform a range of complex functions necessary for life. In the networks of...

Im Focus: Locomotion control with photopigments

Researchers from Göttingen University discover additional function of opsins

Animal photoreceptors capture light with photopigments. Researchers from the University of Göttingen have now discovered that these photopigments fulfill an...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>



Industry & Economy
Event News

Virtual reality conference comes to Reutlingen

19.03.2018 | Event News

Ultrafast Wireless and Chip Design at the DATE Conference in Dresden

16.03.2018 | Event News

International Tinnitus Conference of the Tinnitus Research Initiative in Regensburg

13.03.2018 | Event News

Latest News

TRAPPIST-1 planets provide clues to the nature of habitable worlds

21.03.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

The search for dark matter widens

21.03.2018 | Materials Sciences

Natural enemies reduce pesticide use

21.03.2018 | Life Sciences

Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>