Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Bacterial spray can help children with glue ear

29.03.2010
Many children have long-term problems with fluid in the middle ear, and sometimes surgery is the only way to shift it. However, a bacterial nasal spray can have the same effect in some children, reveals a thesis from the Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden.

The study covered 60 children with glue ear, or secretory otitis media (SOM), who were split into three groups. The first group received a solution containing Streptococcus bacteria, the second a solution with Lactobacillus bacteria, and the third a bacteria-free solution (placebo). These solutions were then sprayed into the children's noses for ten days.

"In the group given the Streptococcus spray, a third of the children got much better or were cured completely, while only one child given the bacteria-free spray recovered," says Susann Skovbjerg, a doctoral student at the Department of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Bacteriology. "Treatment with Lactobacillus bacteria was less effective."

A number of different types of bacteria come under the Streptococcus umbrella. The type used in the study is normally found in the mouth and belongs to the viridans group. The researchers have various theories as to why a spray with these bacteria can help children with glue ear.

"One explanation for the marked improvement may be that the spray stimulates the immune system to conquer the long-term inflammation," says Skovbjerg.

Studies of bacterial sprays have been performed before, including in patients who have had a throat infection and children suffering from recurring acute ear infections, and now their effect has been studied in children with glue ear. The results of these studies have generally been good, but Skovbjerg says that more studies are needed to confirm the results and look at what actually happens in the children treated with the spray.

"In the longer term, bacterial sprays may come to be part of the treatment for glue ear," she says. "They could be used to help the body to heal itself and so perhaps enable some children to avoid an operation."

GLUE EAR
Glue ear, or secretory otitis media (SOM), can occur after an acute ear infection or a cold. It is common in children and can spell long-term problems with fluid in the middle ear, which can result in impaired hearing and, in rare cases, permanent damage to the eardrum. The children are normally examined by an ear specialist, and the condition normally resolves itself. If the fluid does not disappear spontaneously, an operation is performed to insert a plastic tube through the eardrum.
Around 10,000 children in Sweden undergo this operation each year.
For more information, please contact:
Susann Skovbjerg, doctoral student, Department of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Bacteriology,
Institute of Biomedicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg
Tel: +46 31 342 1199, +46 709 56 0843, e-mail: susann.skovbjerg@vgregion.se
Thesis for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy (Medicine) at the Department of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Bacteriology, Institute of Biomedicine, Sahlgrenska Academy
Title of thesis: Inflammatory mediator response to Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in vitro and in middle ear infections

The thesis has been successfully defended.

Helena Aaberg | idw
Further information:
http://hdl.handle.net/2077/21533
http://www.gu.se/

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Organ-on-a-chip mimics heart's biomechanical properties
23.02.2017 | Vanderbilt University

nachricht Researchers identify cause of hereditary skeletal muscle disorder
22.02.2017 | Klinikum der Universität München

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Safe glide at total engine failure with ELA-inside

On January 15, 2009, Chesley B. Sullenberger was celebrated world-wide: after the two engines had failed due to bird strike, he and his flight crew succeeded after a glide flight with an Airbus A320 in ditching on the Hudson River. All 155 people on board were saved.

On January 15, 2009, Chesley B. Sullenberger was celebrated world-wide: after the two engines had failed due to bird strike, he and his flight crew succeeded...

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Safe glide at total engine failure with ELA-inside

27.02.2017 | Information Technology

Fraunhofer IFAM expands its R&D work on Coatings for protection against corrosion and marine growth

27.02.2017 | Materials Sciences

Stingless bees have their nests protected by soldiers

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>