Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Analyzing Tumor Cells in Blood Using Nanomagnets

16.07.2012
Siemens' researchers have been able to analyze blood cells by employing the same magnetic reading technology as is used for computer hard drives.

They have developed a prototype for the magnetic flow cytometry of blood. Blood is the most important source of diagnostic information for doctors tracking the success of therapy for a tumor or HIV. For their new process, the researchers are taking advantage of the GMR (giant magnetoresistance) effect, the discovery of which was the subject of the 2007 Nobel Prize in Physics.



In the field of medical diagnostics, an optical method of measurement for examining the characteristics of individual cells has existed for decades, remaining largely unchanged from the time it was developed. This method is known as flow cytometry, and can be used to identify specific cells, such as circulating tumor cells. Extracting cell data from whole blood, however, requires a time-consuming process. So the costs for traditional flow cytometry are too high for general clinical use or decentralized implementation, and growth in the market for this equipment has mostly been confined to the area of research.

But in the future, the new magnetic flow cytometry could offer a way of carrying out blood testing nearer to the patient (point-of-care), offering a method for specific cell detection in addition to a complete blood count. The scientists at Siemens Corporate Technology are employing GMR reading processes in combination with superparamagnetically marked cells.

Their demonstration model, which is not yet ready for the market, can quantitatively detect specifically marked analytes in whole blood, without requiring pre-conditioning of the sample, such as the lysis (destruction) of red blood cells. Specifically, the marking of these analyte blood cells is accomplished using antibodies, which have superparamagnetic nanoparticles (beads) hanging on them. A magnet then attracts the marked cells, so that they are separated out and, like pearls on a string, they are counted by the GMR sensor.

This process enables the quantitative identification of tumor cells, for example. Through this special experimental design the researchers get four bits of information for each individual cell that is measured. With this information they can determine the cell's diameter and the speed at which it is moving - information which allows them to make accurate conclusions about whether it is a tumor cell or not.

Recently, the researchers showed that miniaturization of this kind of measuring system would be possible. For demonstrating this possibility in his bachelor's thesis, a researcher won the Innovation Prize for Applied Research from Regensburg University of Applied Sciences.

Dr. Norbert Aschenbrenner | Siemens InnovationNews
Further information:
http://www.siemens.com/innovationnews

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Study suggests possible new target for treating and preventing Alzheimer's
02.12.2016 | Oregon Health & Science University

nachricht The first analysis of Ewing's sarcoma methyloma opens doors to new treatments
01.12.2016 | IDIBELL-Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Shape matters when light meets atom

Mapping the interaction of a single atom with a single photon may inform design of quantum devices

Have you ever wondered how you see the world? Vision is about photons of light, which are packets of energy, interacting with the atoms or molecules in what...

Im Focus: Novel silicon etching technique crafts 3-D gradient refractive index micro-optics

A multi-institutional research collaboration has created a novel approach for fabricating three-dimensional micro-optics through the shape-defined formation of porous silicon (PSi), with broad impacts in integrated optoelectronics, imaging, and photovoltaics.

Working with colleagues at Stanford and The Dow Chemical Company, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign fabricated 3-D birefringent...

Im Focus: Quantum Particles Form Droplets

In experiments with magnetic atoms conducted at extremely low temperatures, scientists have demonstrated a unique phase of matter: The atoms form a new type of quantum liquid or quantum droplet state. These so called quantum droplets may preserve their form in absence of external confinement because of quantum effects. The joint team of experimental physicists from Innsbruck and theoretical physicists from Hannover report on their findings in the journal Physical Review X.

“Our Quantum droplets are in the gas phase but they still drop like a rock,” explains experimental physicist Francesca Ferlaino when talking about the...

Im Focus: MADMAX: Max Planck Institute for Physics takes up axion research

The Max Planck Institute for Physics (MPP) is opening up a new research field. A workshop from November 21 - 22, 2016 will mark the start of activities for an innovative axion experiment. Axions are still only purely hypothetical particles. Their detection could solve two fundamental problems in particle physics: What dark matter consists of and why it has not yet been possible to directly observe a CP violation for the strong interaction.

The “MADMAX” project is the MPP’s commitment to axion research. Axions are so far only a theoretical prediction and are difficult to detect: on the one hand,...

Im Focus: Molecules change shape when wet

Broadband rotational spectroscopy unravels structural reshaping of isolated molecules in the gas phase to accommodate water

In two recent publications in the Journal of Chemical Physics and in the Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters, researchers around Melanie Schnell from the Max...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ICTM Conference 2017: Production technology for turbomachine manufacturing of the future

16.11.2016 | Event News

Innovation Day Laser Technology – Laser Additive Manufacturing

01.11.2016 | Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

 
Latest News

NASA's AIM observes early noctilucent ice clouds over Antarctica

05.12.2016 | Earth Sciences

Shape matters when light meets atom

05.12.2016 | Physics and Astronomy

Researchers uncover protein-based “cancer signature”

05.12.2016 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>