Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Amplification of a Stat5 gene produces excess oncogenic protein that drives prostate cancer spread

08.05.2013
An international group of investigators, led by researchers at Thomas Jefferson University's Kimmel Cancer Center, have solved the mystery of why a substantial percentage of castrate-resistant metastatic prostate cancer cells contain abnormally high levels of the pro-growth protein Stat5.

They discovered that the gene that makes the protein is amplified — duplicated many times over — in these cancer cells, which allows them to produce excess amounts of the oncogenic protein.

The study, reported in the May 7 issue of the American Journal of Pathology, found a direct association between the number of Stat5 genes in human prostate cancer cells and Stat5 protein levels, and also revealed that gene amplification and protein levels increased as prostate cancer metastasized and became resistant to castration (anti-androgen) therapy.

The finding is important since agents that inhibit the Stat5 pathway are currently entering clinical trials, says the study's senior author, Marja Nevalainen, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor of Cancer Biology, Medical Oncology, and Urology at Jefferson.

"Our latest findings on Stat5 provide further support for the idea that targeting Stat5 protein pharmacologically might provide powerful therapy for advanced prostate cancer," she says. "Our hope is that a successful agent might prevent some prostate tumors from spreading and might be able to contain metastasis that has already occurred and become castrate-resistant."

The discovery also suggests that testing Stat5 gene amplification in patients could provide a biomarker that identifies those patients most likely to respond to Stat5 inhibition, Dr. Nevalainen says.

Not only is Dr. Nevalainen testing Stat5 inhibitors developed by Astra Zeneca and Novartis in preclinical studies, her lab has also developed its own inhibitor, which is also being tested.

Dr. Nevalainen has long studied Stat5 in prostate cancer, and with her colleagues, has authored a number of crucial studies demonstrating the impact the gene and its protein can have on prostate cancer progression. "Stat5 isn't the only protein that drives prostate cancer, but it is a very important one," she says.

Stat5 is a transcription factor – a protein that can regulate expression of other genes. In 2003, Dr. Nevalainen discovered that Stat5 protein is critical for viability of prostate cancer cells and growth of prostate tumors in mice. In 2004, Dr. Nevalainen found that Stat5 inside a cell's nucleus is often over-expressed in high-grade human prostate cancer, and in 2005, she demonstrated that Stat5 activity was associated with recurrence of prostate cancer in patients who had already been treated. Then, in 2008 she showed that nuclear Stat5 was especially prevalent in recurrent prostate cancers that are resistant to hormone therapy. Most importantly, her research has demonstrated that blocking Stat5 in laboratory and in animal models effectively destroyed prostate cancer. "We know that Stat5 is absolutely critical to the survival of prostate cancer cells," she says.

In 2010, Dr. Nevalainen found that excess Stat5 in prostate cancer cells is linked to metastasis, and excess Stat5 expression predicts early disease recurrence and death from prostate cancer. This study was conducted to investigate why such over-expression of the protein occurs.

The researchers found amplification of the Stat5 gene in a significant fraction of 128 prostate cancer specimens from patients, and that Stat5 gene amplification was more frequently found in metastatic cancers that are no longer responsible to castration treatment (29 percent) and in high histological grade cancers (40 percent). Experiments in cell culture and in mice showed that increased Stat5 copy numbers conferred a growth advantage for tumors.

"Lots of cancers have chromosomal rearrangements that lead to amplification of pro-growth genes," says Dr. Nevalainen. "We don't know exactly why this happens, but it is related to imperfect cell division and unstable genomes."

While it is known that excess Stat5 protein predicts early recurrence of prostate cancer, development of metastatic disease and death from prostate cancer, researchers will need to determine if Stat5 gene amplification is also linked to those outcomes, she adds.

Researchers who contributed to the study included investigators from Georgetown University, the University of Helsinki in Finland, the University of Basel in Switzerland, and the University of Tampere in Finland. The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

The work was supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health, and the Academy of Finland.

Thomas Jefferson University (TJU), the largest freestanding academic medical center in Philadelphia, is nationally renowned for medical and health sciences education and innovative research. Founded in 1824, TJU includes Jefferson Medical College (JMC), one of the largest private medical schools in the country and ranked among the nation's best medical schools by U.S. News & World Report, and the Jefferson Schools of Nursing, Pharmacy, Health Professions, Population Health and the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences. Jefferson University Physicians is TJU's multi-specialty physician practice consisting of the full-time faculty of JMC. Thomas Jefferson University partners with its clinical affiliate, Thomas Jefferson University Hospitals.

Jackie Kozloski | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.jefferson.edu

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Observing the cell's protein factories during self-assembly
15.06.2018 | Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin

nachricht Scientists unravel molecular mechanisms of Parkinson's disease
13.06.2018 | The Francis Crick Institute

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: AchemAsia 2019 will take place in Shanghai

Moving into its fourth decade, AchemAsia is setting out for new horizons: The International Expo and Innovation Forum for Sustainable Chemical Production will take place from 21-23 May 2019 in Shanghai, China. With an updated event profile, the eleventh edition focusses on topics that are especially relevant for the Chinese process industry, putting a strong emphasis on sustainability and innovation.

Founded in 1989 as a spin-off of ACHEMA to cater to the needs of China’s then developing industry, AchemAsia has since grown into a platform where the latest...

Im Focus: First real-time test of Li-Fi utilization for the industrial Internet of Things

The BMBF-funded OWICELLS project was successfully completed with a final presentation at the BMW plant in Munich. The presentation demonstrated a Li-Fi communication with a mobile robot, while the robot carried out usual production processes (welding, moving and testing parts) in a 5x5m² production cell. The robust, optical wireless transmission is based on spatial diversity; in other words, data is sent and received simultaneously by several LEDs and several photodiodes. The system can transmit data at more than 100 Mbit/s and five milliseconds latency.

Modern production technologies in the automobile industry must become more flexible in order to fulfil individual customer requirements.

Im Focus: Sharp images with flexible fibers

An international team of scientists has discovered a new way to transfer image information through multimodal fibers with almost no distortion - even if the fiber is bent. The results of the study, to which scientist from the Leibniz-Institute of Photonic Technology Jena (Leibniz IPHT) contributed, were published on 6thJune in the highly-cited journal Physical Review Letters.

Endoscopes allow doctors to see into a patient’s body like through a keyhole. Typically, the images are transmitted via a bundle of several hundreds of optical...

Im Focus: Photoexcited graphene puzzle solved

A boost for graphene-based light detectors

Light detection and control lies at the heart of many modern device applications, such as smartphone cameras. Using graphene as a light-sensitive material for...

Im Focus: Water is not the same as water

Water molecules exist in two different forms with almost identical physical properties. For the first time, researchers have succeeded in separating the two forms to show that they can exhibit different chemical reactivities. These results were reported by researchers from the University of Basel and their colleagues in Hamburg in the scientific journal Nature Communications.

From a chemical perspective, water is a molecule in which a single oxygen atom is linked to two hydrogen atoms. It is less well known that water exists in two...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Munich conference on asteroid detection, tracking and defense

13.06.2018 | Event News

2nd International Baltic Earth Conference in Denmark: “The Baltic Sea region in Transition”

08.06.2018 | Event News

ISEKI_Food 2018: Conference with Holistic View of Food Production

05.06.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

A sprinkle of platinum nanoparticles onto graphene makes brain probes more sensitive

15.06.2018 | Materials Sciences

100 % Organic Farming in Bhutan – a Realistic Target?

15.06.2018 | Ecology, The Environment and Conservation

Perovskite-silicon solar cell research collaboration hits 25.2% efficiency

15.06.2018 | Power and Electrical Engineering

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>