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New version of syngo.via brings "anatomical intelligence" to diagnostic reading

26.11.2013
- Diagnostic confidence and greater efficiency with syngo.via General Engine
- Software that "understands" human anatomy
- Meaningful diagnostic reports with syngo.via Advanced Reporting

Siemens Healthcare introduces version VA30 of its routine 3D and advanced reading software syngo.via, featuring new applications and functionalities that further streamline and accelerate the syngo.via experience.


syngo.via General Engine is a new package of highly automated and standardized applications. As depicted here, the feature "Anatomical Range Presets" displays a quick, precise, optimal view of selected anatomical regions. The syngo.via Advanced Reporting tool, part of the syngo.via General Engine, helps radiologists create clear, well-structured reports for the referring or follow-up physicians.

The latest innovation is the syngo.via General Engine, a new package of highly automated and standardized applications. "Anatomical Range Presets," for example, identifies individual regions of the body on images captured using computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), aligns the image projections accordingly, then selects detailed views to facilitate case preparation. For customers, this means greater efficiency and enables higher diagnostic confidence.

Siemens is making syngo.via more anatomically intelligent to support radiologists and medical technology personnel in their routine workflows. The software "understands" human anatomy and prepares the images for diagnostic reading. Syngo.via VA30 features "Automatic Rib Labeling," for example, which automatically identifies and labels the ribs in CT scans. Until now, radiologists had to identify the ribs manually. Given the unique shape of the ribs, this can be time-consuming and lead to errors, especially in complex diagnostic environments such as oncology.

Anatomical intelligence is also a hallmark of the new syngo.via General Engine software package with which customers can upgrade their software. The package includes the "Anatomical Range Presets" feature, which displays a quick, precise, optimal view of selected anatomical regions. To facilitate diagnoses, users often create such views manually, performing the multi-step process of selecting the relevant area, aligning the image projections accordingly, and editing the detailed view. This takes time, requires anatomical expertise, and is error-prone. The new application from Siemens largely automates these steps. This delivers a consistent quality of the resulting anatomical views and snapshots that does not depend on the skill of the specific user. Using a technology akin to facial recognition in digital photography, syngo.via is able to recognize shoulders, spines, hips, etc. in clinical images and optimize how they are displayed in their anatomical environment. The presets are initially available for specific anatomical regions in CT and MRI images.

Following an examination, the radiological diagnostic report plays a key role in the treatment of the patient. The syngo.via Advanced Reporting tool, part of the syngo.via General Engine, helps radiologists create clear, well-structured reports for the referring or follow-up physicians. Standardized templates make it easier to create reports but can still be customized to individual needs, and findings from multiple examinations can be consolidated into a single report. In the past, multiple diagnoses meant having different documents pertaining to a single case. Now, the diagnostic report reflects the patient's entire disease profile. This makes it much easier for doctors to form a comprehensive assessment of the patient's condition, which helps to improve the quality of treatment.

The Siemens Healthcare Sector is one of the world's largest suppliers to the healthcare industry and a trendsetter in medical imaging, laboratory diagnostics, medical information technology and hearing aids. Siemens offers its customers products and solutions for the entire range of patient care from a single source – from prevention and early detection to diagnosis, and on to treatment and aftercare. By optimizing clinical workflows for the most common diseases, Siemens also makes healthcare faster, better and more cost-effective. Siemens Healthcare employs some 52,000 employees worldwide and operates around the world. In fiscal year 2013 (to September 30), the Sector posted revenue of 13.6 billion euros and profit of 2.0 billion euros. For further information please visit: http://www.siemens.com/healthcare

Syngo.via can be used as a standalone device or together with a variety of syngo.via-based software options, which are medical devices in their own rights.
Syngo.via and the syngo.via-based software options are pending in some countries the necessary clearances and thus are not available for sales in all countries.
The syngo.via General Engine is part of the medical device syngo.via.
Rib Labeling is not available in the US.
Reference Number: HIM201311012e
Contact
Ms. Stefanie Schiller
Healthcare Sector
Siemens AG
Henkestr. 127
91052 Erlangen
Germany
Tel: +49 (9131) 84-7803
schiller.stefanie​@siemens.com

Stefanie Schiller | Siemens Healthcare
Further information:
http://www.siemens.com/press/rsna2013
http://www.siemens.com/syngo.via

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