Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Unique image precision for disease treatment

01.08.2014

Siemens is improving diagnosis and treatment of diseases with a unique imaging system that locates metabolic processes using nuclear detectors and x-ray images with high accuracy.

Symbia IntevoTM*, the world's first xSPECT* system, integrates metabolic information from single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) into computed tomography (CT) images.


Previously, SPECT/CT images had low spatial resolution and physicians needed extensive experience and additional follow-up studies to decide whether a metabolic anomaly reflected a tumor or other diseases. Symbia Intevo also enables physicians to determine tumor size and thus plan treatment and monitor outcomes.

During SPECT examinations, patients are given low doses of radiopharma­ceuticals that emit radiation when they react with a particular body tissue. Different metabolic processes can thus be observed depending on the agent administered. To determine the location of a metabolic disorder in the body, SPECT information is overlaid with CT images showing the anatomy of the body.

Until now, the problem has been that SPECT examinations offer only low spatial resolution and the high-precision CT images have to be adapted to match them. It can happen that the resulting image no longer clearly shows whether the metabolic disorder observed is inside or outside the bone. It would initially be unclear whether the anomaly was caused by a tumor in the bone or something else, such as a soft tissue inflammation.

The developers at Siemens Health­care have now integrated SPECT and CT data in such a way that the high spatial resolution of the x-ray images remains intact and the SPECT images are significantly improved. The two datasets are generated sequentially during reconstruction in the same device using reference parameters such as the position of the detectors relative to the patient.

New, iterative image reconstruction algorithms refine the data in several passes. It was not previously possible to perform such complex calculation processes at the high resolution used in the CT images. That's why, in addition to new software, Symbia Intevo is also equipped with a powerful 64-bit computer.

The precise xSPECT data also makes it possible to determine the volume of the radiopharmaceutical used. This means that physicians can observe the change in metabolic activity and check whether their treatment is working.

Symbia Intevo also utilizes state-of-the-art algorithms that use the CT measurements to assign each voxel (three-dimensional pixel) in the xSPECT image to a particular class-fatty tissue, soft tissue, air, or hard (external) and soft (internal) bone areas. This makes it easy to recognize the body part where the metabolic disorder is located.

* Symbia Intevo and xSPECT are not commercially available in all countries. Due to regulatory reasons their future availability cannot be guaranteed.

Weitere Informationen:

http://www.siemens.com/innovationnews

Dr. Norbert Aschenbrenner | Siemens InnovationNews

Further reports about: CT SPECT activity diseases disorder metabolic reconstruction spatial tomography

More articles from Medical Engineering:

nachricht The intravenous swim team
28.07.2016 | Drexel University

nachricht MRI technique induces strong, enduring visual association
01.07.2016 | Brown University

All articles from Medical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Self-assembling nano inks form conductive and transparent grids during imprint

Transparent electronics devices are present in today’s thin film displays, solar cells, and touchscreens. The future will bring flexible versions of such devices. Their production requires printable materials that are transparent and remain highly conductive even when deformed. Researchers at INM – Leibniz Institute for New Materials have combined a new self-assembling nano ink with an imprint process to create flexible conductive grids with a resolution below one micrometer.

To print the grids, an ink of gold nanowires is applied to a substrate. A structured stamp is pressed on the substrate and forces the ink into a pattern. “The...

Im Focus: The Glowing Brain

A new Fraunhofer MEVIS method conveys medical interrelationships quickly and intuitively with innovative visualization technology

On the monitor, a brain spins slowly and can be examined from every angle. Suddenly, some sections start glowing, first on the side and then the entire back of...

Im Focus: Newly discovered material property may lead to high temp superconductivity

Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Ames Laboratory have discovered an unusual property of purple bronze that may point to new ways to achieve high temperature superconductivity.

While studying purple bronze, a molybdenum oxide, researchers discovered an unconventional charge density wave on its surface.

Im Focus: Mapping electromagnetic waveforms

Munich Physicists have developed a novel electron microscope that can visualize electromagnetic fields oscillating at frequencies of billions of cycles per second.

Temporally varying electromagnetic fields are the driving force behind the whole of electronics. Their polarities can change at mind-bogglingly fast rates, and...

Im Focus: Continental tug-of-war - until the rope snaps

Breakup of continents with two speed: Continents initially stretch very slowly along the future splitting zone, but then move apart very quickly before the onset of rupture. The final speed can be up to 20 times faster than in the first, slow extension phase.phases

Present-day continents were shaped hundreds of millions of years ago as the supercontinent Pangaea broke apart. Derived from Pangaea’s main fragments Gondwana...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Clash of Realities 2016: 7th Conference on the Art, Technology and Theory of Digital Games

29.07.2016 | Event News

GROWING IN CITIES - Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Urban Gardening

15.07.2016 | Event News

SIGGRAPH2016 Computer Graphics Interactive Techniques, 24-28 July, Anaheim, California

15.07.2016 | Event News

 
Latest News

Vortex laser offers hope for Moore's Law

29.07.2016 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Novel 'repair system' discovered in algae may yield new tools for biotechnology

29.07.2016 | Life Sciences

Clash of Realities 2016: 7th Conference on the Art, Technology and Theory of Digital Games

29.07.2016 | Event News

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>