Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Unique image precision for disease treatment

01.08.2014

Siemens is improving diagnosis and treatment of diseases with a unique imaging system that locates metabolic processes using nuclear detectors and x-ray images with high accuracy.

Symbia IntevoTM*, the world's first xSPECT* system, integrates metabolic information from single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) into computed tomography (CT) images.


Previously, SPECT/CT images had low spatial resolution and physicians needed extensive experience and additional follow-up studies to decide whether a metabolic anomaly reflected a tumor or other diseases. Symbia Intevo also enables physicians to determine tumor size and thus plan treatment and monitor outcomes.

During SPECT examinations, patients are given low doses of radiopharma­ceuticals that emit radiation when they react with a particular body tissue. Different metabolic processes can thus be observed depending on the agent administered. To determine the location of a metabolic disorder in the body, SPECT information is overlaid with CT images showing the anatomy of the body.

Until now, the problem has been that SPECT examinations offer only low spatial resolution and the high-precision CT images have to be adapted to match them. It can happen that the resulting image no longer clearly shows whether the metabolic disorder observed is inside or outside the bone. It would initially be unclear whether the anomaly was caused by a tumor in the bone or something else, such as a soft tissue inflammation.

The developers at Siemens Health­care have now integrated SPECT and CT data in such a way that the high spatial resolution of the x-ray images remains intact and the SPECT images are significantly improved. The two datasets are generated sequentially during reconstruction in the same device using reference parameters such as the position of the detectors relative to the patient.

New, iterative image reconstruction algorithms refine the data in several passes. It was not previously possible to perform such complex calculation processes at the high resolution used in the CT images. That's why, in addition to new software, Symbia Intevo is also equipped with a powerful 64-bit computer.

The precise xSPECT data also makes it possible to determine the volume of the radiopharmaceutical used. This means that physicians can observe the change in metabolic activity and check whether their treatment is working.

Symbia Intevo also utilizes state-of-the-art algorithms that use the CT measurements to assign each voxel (three-dimensional pixel) in the xSPECT image to a particular class-fatty tissue, soft tissue, air, or hard (external) and soft (internal) bone areas. This makes it easy to recognize the body part where the metabolic disorder is located.

* Symbia Intevo and xSPECT are not commercially available in all countries. Due to regulatory reasons their future availability cannot be guaranteed.

Weitere Informationen:

http://www.siemens.com/innovationnews

Dr. Norbert Aschenbrenner | Siemens InnovationNews

Further reports about: CT SPECT activity diseases disorder metabolic reconstruction spatial tomography

More articles from Medical Engineering:

nachricht Novel PET imaging agent could help guide therapy for brain diseases
03.04.2018 | Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging

nachricht New Computer Architecture: Time Lapse for Dementia Research
29.03.2018 | Deutsches Zentrum für Neurodegenerative Erkrankungen e.V. (DZNE)

All articles from Medical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Spider silk key to new bone-fixing composite

University of Connecticut researchers have created a biodegradable composite made of silk fibers that can be used to repair broken load-bearing bones without the complications sometimes presented by other materials.

Repairing major load-bearing bones such as those in the leg can be a long and uncomfortable process.

Im Focus: Writing and deleting magnets with lasers

Study published in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces is the outcome of an international effort that included teams from Dresden and Berlin in Germany, and the US.

Scientists at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) together with colleagues from the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) and the University of Virginia...

Im Focus: Gamma-ray flashes from plasma filaments

Novel highly efficient and brilliant gamma-ray source: Based on model calculations, physicists of the Max PIanck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg propose a novel method for an efficient high-brilliance gamma-ray source. A giant collimated gamma-ray pulse is generated from the interaction of a dense ultra-relativistic electron beam with a thin solid conductor. Energetic gamma-rays are copiously produced as the electron beam splits into filaments while propagating across the conductor. The resulting gamma-ray energy and flux enable novel experiments in nuclear and fundamental physics.

The typical wavelength of light interacting with an object of the microcosm scales with the size of this object. For atoms, this ranges from visible light to...

Im Focus: Basel researchers succeed in cultivating cartilage from stem cells

Stable joint cartilage can be produced from adult stem cells originating from bone marrow. This is made possible by inducing specific molecular processes occurring during embryonic cartilage formation, as researchers from the University and University Hospital of Basel report in the scientific journal PNAS.

Certain mesenchymal stem/stromal cells from the bone marrow of adults are considered extremely promising for skeletal tissue regeneration. These adult stem...

Im Focus: Like a wedge in a hinge

Researchers lay groundwork to tailor drugs for new targets in cancer therapy

In the fight against cancer, scientists are developing new drugs to hit tumor cells at so far unused weak points. Such a “sore spot” is the protein complex...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Invitation to the upcoming "Current Topics in Bioinformatics: Big Data in Genomics and Medicine"

13.04.2018 | Event News

Unique scope of UV LED technologies and applications presented in Berlin: ICULTA-2018

12.04.2018 | Event News

IWOLIA: A conference bringing together German Industrie 4.0 and French Industrie du Futur

09.04.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Magnetic nano-imaging on a table top

20.04.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Start of work for the world's largest electric truck

20.04.2018 | Interdisciplinary Research

Atoms may hum a tune from grand cosmic symphony

20.04.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>