Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Ultra-high-field MRI may allow earlier diagnosis of Parkinson's disease

05.03.2014

New research shows that ultra-high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides detailed views of a brain area implicated in Parkinson's disease, possibly leading to earlier detection of a condition that affects millions worldwide. The results of this research are published online in the journal Radiology.

Parkinson's disease is a chronic, progressive disease characterized by shaking, stiffness, and impaired balance and coordination. With no radiologic techniques available to aid in diagnosis, clinicians have had to rely on medical history and neurological examination. It is often difficult to distinguish Parkinson's disease from other conditions using these methods alone.


Top row: 7-T three-dimensional multiecho susceptibility-weighted in vivo images of SN in healthy 64-year-old man, located between the crus cerebri (a) and the red nucleus. Axial sections perpendicular to the floor of fourth ventricle are obtained at level of the inferior third of the red nucleus (level I), at the level of decussation of superior cerebellar peduncles (e) (level II), and at the level of the inferior colliculi (level III). At level I, SN appears as homogeneous hypointense structure in the medial part of the cerebral peduncle, and is laterally constituted by a hyperintense oval area between two hypointense layers (c1). At level II, a trilaminar organization of the SN with a central hyperintense layer (b) between two hypointense tiers (c and d) is detectable. At level III, the dorsal hypointense lamina could be detected as a small residual lateral hypointense area, while the hyperintense layer fades into the isointense cerebral peduncle. Bottom row: 7-T three-dimensional multiecho susceptibility-weighted in vivo images of the SN in PD patients. The loss of normal anatomy of the SN in a 61-year-old man with PD is characterized by the disappearance of the oval-shape bright spot in the lateral part of the SN at level I and by the loss of the hyperintense intermediate layer of the SN at level II. HC = healthy subject.

Credit: Radiological Society of North America


Images show axial spin-echo proton density (on the right) and GRE (on the left) of the SN at level I of an ex vivo brain sample in a 67-year-old woman. There is a triple-layered organization of the SN comparable to that showed in the in vivo images. Ventrally a low-signal-intensity layer (b) is attributable to the pars reticulata of the SN. In the middle part of the SN, a hyperintense band (c) corresponds to the ventral component of the pars compacta of the SN. The lateral part of this layer shows a high-signalintensity spot (c1) corresponding to the oval shape hyperintensity of the in vivo three-dimensional multiecho susceptibility-weighted images that resemble the nigrosome formation. The dorsal hypointense layer visible on both spin-echo and GRE images (d) is referred to the dorsal component of the pars compacta of the SN. a = crus cerebri, e = brachjum conjunctivum, f = medial lemniscus, g = lateral lemniscus, h = central tegmental tract.

Credit: Radiological Society of North America

Mirco Cosottini, M.D., from the University of Pisa in Italy, and colleagues studied the brains of 38 individuals, including 17 Parkinson's disease patients and 21 healthy controls, as well as a brain specimen from a deceased individual, to help determine the accuracy of ultra-high-field 7-Tesla (7-T) MRI for identifying Parkinson's disease. Using the 7-T MRI, the researchers were able to distinguish a three-layered organization of the substantia nigra (SN), a crescent-shaped mass of cells in the midbrain.

Parkinson's disease results from the loss of dopamine-producing cells located in this region of the brain. Dopamine is an important neurotransmitter involved in multiple brain functions, including motor and behavioral processes such as mood, reward, addiction and stress. Based on abnormalities in the SN identified by the 7-T MRI, the researchers correctly classified patients with Parkinson's disease with a sensitivity of 100 percent and specificity of 96.2 percent.

According to Dr. Cosottini, the results show promise for earlier detection of the disease, which could speed the initiation of treatment.

"Parkinson's disease diagnosis remains clinically based, but with the introduction of 7-T MRI into clinical practice, a supporting radiologic diagnosis can be made," he said.

The researchers also are exploring the clinical utility of 7-T MRI in several other neurodegenerative diseases, including mild cognitive impairment, a precursor of Alzheimer's disease.

###

"MR Imaging of the Substantia Nigra at 7 T Enables Diagnosis of Parkinson Disease." Collaborating with Dr. Cosottini were Daniela Frosini, M.D., Ilaria Pesaresi, M.D., Mauro Costagli, Ph.D., Laura Biagi, Ph.D., Roberto Ceravolo, M.D., Ubaldo Bonuccelli, M.D., and Michela Tosetti, Ph.D.

Radiology is edited by Herbert Y. Kressel, M.D., Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass., and owned and published by the Radiological Society of North America, Inc. (http://radiology.rsna.org/)

RSNA is an association of more than 53,000 radiologists, radiation oncologists, medical physicists and related scientists promoting excellence in patient care and health care delivery through education, research and technologic innovation. The Society is based in Oak Brook, Ill. (RSNA.org)

For patient-friendly information on MRI, visit RadiologyInfo.org.

Linda Brooks | EurekAlert!

Further reports about: 7-Tesla MRI Parkinson RSNA Substantia cognitive diagnosis diseases radiology

More articles from Medical Engineering:

nachricht Using 'Pacemakers' in spinal cord injuries
12.02.2016 | Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin

nachricht Fraunhofer ITEM takes over and continues development of inhalation technology assets from Takeda
10.02.2016 | Fraunhofer Institute for Toxicology and Experimental Medicine

All articles from Medical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Production of an AIDS vaccine in algae

Today, plants and microorganisms are heavily used for the production of medicinal products. The production of biopharmaceuticals in plants, also referred to as “Molecular Pharming”, represents a continuously growing field of plant biotechnology. Preferred host organisms include yeast and crop plants, such as maize and potato – plants with high demands. With the help of a special algal strain, the research team of Prof. Ralph Bock at the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology in Potsdam strives to develop a more efficient and resource-saving system for the production of medicines and vaccines. They tested its practicality by synthesizing a component of a potential AIDS vaccine.

The use of plants and microorganisms to produce pharmaceuticals is nothing new. In 1982, bacteria were genetically modified to produce human insulin, a drug...

Im Focus: The most accurate optical single-ion clock worldwide

Atomic clock experts from the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) are the first research group in the world to have built an optical single-ion clock which attains an accuracy which had only been predicted theoretically so far. Their optical ytterbium clock achieved a relative systematic measurement uncertainty of 3 E-18. The results have been published in the current issue of the scientific journal "Physical Review Letters".

Atomic clock experts from the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) are the first research group in the world to have built an optical single-ion clock...

Im Focus: Goodbye ground control: autonomous nanosatellites

The University of Würzburg has two new space projects in the pipeline which are concerned with the observation of planets and autonomous fault correction aboard satellites. The German Federal Ministry of Economic Affairs and Energy funds the projects with around 1.6 million euros.

Detecting tornadoes that sweep across Mars. Discovering meteors that fall to Earth. Investigating strange lightning that flashes from Earth's atmosphere into...

Im Focus: Flow phenomena on solid surfaces: Physicists highlight key role played by boundary layer velocity

Physicists from Saarland University and the ESPCI in Paris have shown how liquids on solid surfaces can be made to slide over the surface a bit like a bobsleigh on ice. The key is to apply a coating at the boundary between the liquid and the surface that induces the liquid to slip. This results in an increase in the average flow velocity of the liquid and its throughput. This was demonstrated by studying the behaviour of droplets on surfaces with different coatings as they evolved into the equilibrium state. The results could prove useful in optimizing industrial processes, such as the extrusion of plastics.

The study has been published in the respected academic journal PNAS (Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America).

Im Focus: New study: How stable is the West Antarctic Ice Sheet?

Exceeding critical temperature limits in the Southern Ocean may cause the collapse of ice sheets and a sharp rise in sea levels

A future warming of the Southern Ocean caused by rising greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere may severely disrupt the stability of the West...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Symposium on Climate Change Adaptation in Africa 2016

12.02.2016 | Event News

Travel grants available: Meet the world’s most proficient mathematicians and computer scientists

09.02.2016 | Event News

AKL’16: Experience Laser Technology Live in Europe´s Largest Laser Application Center!

02.02.2016 | Event News

 
Latest News

LIGO confirms RIT's breakthrough prediction of gravitational waves

12.02.2016 | Physics and Astronomy

Gene switch may repair DNA and prevent cancer

12.02.2016 | Life Sciences

Using 'Pacemakers' in spinal cord injuries

12.02.2016 | Medical Engineering

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>