Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:


Success for Mainz University Medical Center: German Research Foundation approves new CRC/Transregio

New Transregional Collaborative Research Center under the direction of Mainz University Medical Center is to focus on multiple sclerosis research

On July 1, 2012, the German Research Foundation (DFG) will set up a new Transregional Collaborative Research Center (CRC/Transregio) to be coordinated by the University Medical Center of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz.

The new CRC/Transregio will attract total funding of €13.3 million over an initial period of four years. The establishment of the Translational Neurosciences (FTN) research unit at Mainz University and the coordination of all neuroscience activities within the new Rhine-Main Neuroscience Network (rmn²), together with the collaboration of the Goethe University (GU) in Frankfurt am Main, put in place the groundwork for the successful implementation of the new Transregional Collaborative Research Center. Also participating will be the University of Münster, the Ludwig Maximilians University Munich, the Technical University of Munich, the Goethe University in Frankfurt as well as the Max Planck Institutes in Munich, Münster, and Bad Nauheim.

The central aims of the new CRC/Transregio 128, "Initiating/Effector versus Regulatory Mechanisms in Multiple Sclerosis – Progress towards tackling the disease," are to create a basis for the development of new treatments of multiple sclerosis (MS) and to better understand existing treatment concepts. In addition, the researchers also hope to discover how MS develops. Acting as coordinator for the joint project will be Professor Dr. Frauke Zipp, Director of the Department of Neurology at the Mainz University Medical Center.

In the western world, multiple sclerosis is the most common chronic inflammatory disorder of the central nervous system; in Germany alone, more than 120,000 people are affected. "There are many aspects about MS that we still don't understand, such as the cause of this autoimmune disease. The key to more effective treatments lies in fundamental research and this is exactly where the new Transregional Collaborative Research Center 128, under the direction of the Mainz University Medical Center, will be taking an innovative and interdisciplinary approach," states the Chief Scientific Officer of Mainz University Medical Center, Professor Dr. Dr. Reinhard Urban. "The restructuring of our research units at the Medical Center is now bearing fruit," he adds.

"The huge potential of CRC/Transregio 128 results from the fact that we are also taking on board leading researchers from neighboring scientific disciplines. This human network will thus take new routes that go beyond traditional neuroimmunology," explains Professor Frauke Zipp. A further key aspect, according to the neurologist, is that experimental research and patient-oriented clinical research will be closely coordinated with each other.

Professor Dr. Frauke Zipp relocated from the Charité in Berlin to Mainz on December 1, 2009 and views the approval of this Collaborative Research Center as an important development on the way to making the Rhine-Main Neuroscience Network, together with its partners in Münster and Munich, an international hub of research into multiple sclerosis.

Petra Giegerich | idw
Further information:

More articles from Medical Engineering:

nachricht Gentle sensors for diagnosing brain disorders
29.09.2016 | King Abdullah University of Science and Technology

nachricht New imaging technique in Alzheimer’s disease - opens up possibilities for new drug development
28.09.2016 | Lund University

All articles from Medical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Etching Microstructures with Lasers

Ultrafast lasers have introduced new possibilities in engraving ultrafine structures, and scientists are now also investigating how to use them to etch microstructures into thin glass. There are possible applications in analytics (lab on a chip) and especially in electronics and the consumer sector, where great interest has been shown.

This new method was born of a surprising phenomenon: irradiating glass in a particular way with an ultrafast laser has the effect of making the glass up to a...

Im Focus: Light-driven atomic rotations excite magnetic waves

Terahertz excitation of selected crystal vibrations leads to an effective magnetic field that drives coherent spin motion

Controlling functional properties by light is one of the grand goals in modern condensed matter physics and materials science. A new study now demonstrates how...

Im Focus: New 3-D wiring technique brings scalable quantum computers closer to reality

Researchers from the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) at the University of Waterloo led the development of a new extensible wiring technique capable of controlling superconducting quantum bits, representing a significant step towards to the realization of a scalable quantum computer.

"The quantum socket is a wiring method that uses three-dimensional wires based on spring-loaded pins to address individual qubits," said Jeremy Béjanin, a PhD...

Im Focus: Scientists develop a semiconductor nanocomposite material that moves in response to light

In a paper in Scientific Reports, a research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute describes a novel light-activated phenomenon that could become the basis for applications as diverse as microscopic robotic grippers and more efficient solar cells.

A research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) has developed a revolutionary, light-activated semiconductor nanocomposite material that can be used...

Im Focus: Diamonds aren't forever: Sandia, Harvard team create first quantum computer bridge

By forcefully embedding two silicon atoms in a diamond matrix, Sandia researchers have demonstrated for the first time on a single chip all the components needed to create a quantum bridge to link quantum computers together.

"People have already built small quantum computers," says Sandia researcher Ryan Camacho. "Maybe the first useful one won't be a single giant quantum computer...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>



Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

Agricultural Trade Developments and Potentials in Central Asia and the South Caucasus

14.10.2016 | Event News

World Health Summit – Day Three: A Call to Action

12.10.2016 | Event News

Latest News

3-D-printed structures shrink when heated

26.10.2016 | Materials Sciences

Indian roadside refuse fires produce toxic rainbow

26.10.2016 | Health and Medicine

First results of NSTX-U research operations

26.10.2016 | Physics and Astronomy

More VideoLinks >>>