Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Stereotactic Breast Biopsy Made Easy with Mammomat Inspiration

27.11.2008
Siemens Healthcare has introduced its new biopsy unit to the market, enhancing the Mammomat Inspiration digital mammography platform with stereotactic breast biopsy.

The digital system with basic functions for screening has been on the market since the end of 2007. Since then, it has been installed in countless hospitals and private practices worldwide.


The new device with its supplemental biopsy function recently went into operation in Copenhagen and Dortmund. Using the new system, all workflows are performed faster and easier than ever before. The biopsy unit is easy to install; it simply slides on the full-field detector of the mammography platform. Using the same detector ensures that the radiographic image quality remains high. The mammography system detects the biopsy unit and automatically switches all hardware and software configuration settings to the biopsy mode. A preconfigured examination workflow and a well-defined user interface intuitively guide clinical personnel through the intervention.

Dr. Ilse Vejborg, Head of Radiology at Rigshospitalet in Copenhagen, is impressed by the system advantages: “Performing stereotactic biopsy on Mammomat Inspiration, we found the system easy to learn and easy to use. Our first impression is that the new system is very efficient to tackle microcalcifications, which are clearly depicted on the stereo images and accurately collected by the biopsy unit.”

The system enables vertical or lateral needle access to lesions. Another advantage is that only one space-saving, ergonomic workstation is required for all applications of the mammography platform. With Mammomat Inspiration, screening, diagnostics, biopsy, and tomosynthesis (in the future) are all based on one digital platform for the first time. A hospital or private practice can purchase a screening device as needed, and enhance this basic system with the biopsy unit and, eventually, with 3D tomosynthesis currently in development.

The Siemens Healthcare Sector is one of the world’s largest suppliers to the healthcare industry. The company is a renowned medical solutions provider with core competence and innovative strength in diagnostic and therapeutic technologies as well as in knowledge engineering, including information technology and system integration. With its laboratory diagnostics acquisitions, Siemens Healthcare is the first integrated healthcare company, bringing together imaging and lab diagnostics, therapy, and healthcare information technology solutions, supplemented by consulting and support services. Siemens Healthcare delivers solutions across the entire continuum of care – from prevention and early detection, to diagnosis, therapy and care. Additionally, Siemens Healthcare is the global market leader in innovative hearing instruments. The company employs more than 49,000 people worldwide and operates in 130 countries. In the fiscal year 2008 (Sept. 30), Siemens Healthcare reported sales of €11.17 billion, orders of €11.78 billion, and group profit of €1.23 billion. (Preliminary figures)

Bianca Braun | Siemens Healthcare
Further information:
http://www.siemens.com/healthcare

More articles from Medical Engineering:

nachricht 3-D visualization of the pancreas -- new tool in diabetes research
15.03.2017 | Umea University

nachricht New PET radiotracer identifies inflammation in life-threatening atherosclerosis
02.03.2017 | Society of Nuclear Medicine

All articles from Medical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

Im Focus: Researchers Imitate Molecular Crowding in Cells

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to simulate these confined natural conditions in artificial vesicles for the first time. As reported in the academic journal Small, the results are offering better insight into the development of nanoreactors and artificial organelles.

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Argon is not the 'dope' for metallic hydrogen

24.03.2017 | Materials Sciences

Astronomers find unexpected, dust-obscured star formation in distant galaxy

24.03.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Gravitational wave kicks monster black hole out of galactic core

24.03.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>