Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

World class technology and talent battle cancer at the Centenary Institute

27.11.2007
Top Austrian professor puts cancer under the microscope

The Centenary Institute, one of Australia’s leading medical research institutes, unveiled a powerful microscope unlike any other in Australia today. Representing the cutting edge in medical technology and microscopy, the unique imaging features of the multiphoton microscope will enable scientists at the Centenary Institute unprecedented access to the secret workings of living tissues at the cellular and molecular level.

The Centenary Institute is equally excited about the arrival of Austrian Professor Wolfgang Weninger, one of only a handful of people in the world who specialises in using the multiphoton microscope in the immunology field to view immune responses in real-time in living tissue.

At the Centenary, Professor Weninger will lead a team of researchers to study the dynamics of the immune system’s response to cancer and infectious diseases.

Professor Weninger said, “Cancer is still a leading cause of death in Australia. There is a need to develop improved anti-cancer therapies based on the use of the body’s own resources - namely our immune system. This type of microscope is an outstanding tool to study how our bodies fight cancer both in early and advanced stages. If we can learn more about how our immune system attacks cancer cells directly in the context of intact tissues, we hope to develop improved immuno-therapies.”

Using the multiphoton microscope, Professor Weninger’s team pioneered ground-breaking imaging models to record how the body’s defences fight tumours and infectious diseases. He has already astounded the medical community in Australia and the world by showing real-time videos of white blood cells invading and destroying cancer cells in living tissue. Centenary’s Executive Director, Professor Mathew Vadas said, “The arrival of Professor Weninger and the multiphoton microscope marks a new era in medical research for the Centenary Institute.

With one of his recently published papers among the ten all-time highest-ranked papers in biomedicine, we are honoured to have such an eminent researcher as Professor Weninger join the Centenary Institute.

I am confident that the results of his team’s research will vastly improve our understanding of how the body’s immune system fights cancer and infectious diseases. The multiphoton microscope will also support the research of other Centenary scientists particularly in autoimmune and liver diseases.”

The multiphoton microscope at the Centenary Institute has two unique features, its imaging mode and laser. The unique imaging mode uses multiple laser beams and means fast moving objects and dynamic processes in living tissue can be viewed, for example, cells in the blood stream. The laser has been enhanced with a unit called an OPO that produces longer wavelengths of light than those used in other microscopes enabling researchers to potentially look deeper into living tissue than ever before.

Jane Moloney | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.centenary.org.au
http://www.researchaustralia.com.au

More articles from Medical Engineering:

nachricht MRI technique differentiates benign breast lesions from malignancies
20.02.2018 | Radiological Society of North America

nachricht True to type: From human biopsy to complex gut physiology on a chip
14.02.2018 | Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard

All articles from Medical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: In best circles: First integrated circuit from self-assembled polymer

For the first time, a team of researchers at the Max-Planck Institute (MPI) for Polymer Research in Mainz, Germany, has succeeded in making an integrated circuit (IC) from just a monolayer of a semiconducting polymer via a bottom-up, self-assembly approach.

In the self-assembly process, the semiconducting polymer arranges itself into an ordered monolayer in a transistor. The transistors are binary switches used...

Im Focus: Demonstration of a single molecule piezoelectric effect

Breakthrough provides a new concept of the design of molecular motors, sensors and electricity generators at nanoscale

Researchers from the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of the CAS (IOCB Prague), Institute of Physics of the CAS (IP CAS) and Palacký University...

Im Focus: Hybrid optics bring color imaging using ultrathin metalenses into focus

For photographers and scientists, lenses are lifesavers. They reflect and refract light, making possible the imaging systems that drive discovery through the microscope and preserve history through cameras.

But today's glass-based lenses are bulky and resist miniaturization. Next-generation technologies, such as ultrathin cameras or tiny microscopes, require...

Im Focus: Stem cell divisions in the adult brain seen for the first time

Scientists from the University of Zurich have succeeded for the first time in tracking individual stem cells and their neuronal progeny over months within the intact adult brain. This study sheds light on how new neurons are produced throughout life.

The generation of new nerve cells was once thought to taper off at the end of embryonic development. However, recent research has shown that the adult brain...

Im Focus: Interference as a new method for cooling quantum devices

Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. Study published in Physical Review Letters

Quantum computer parts are sensitive and need to be cooled to very low temperatures. Their tiny size makes them particularly susceptible to a temperature...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

2nd International Conference on High Temperature Shape Memory Alloys (HTSMAs)

15.02.2018 | Event News

Aachen DC Grid Summit 2018

13.02.2018 | Event News

How Global Climate Policy Can Learn from the Energy Transition

12.02.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Researchers invent tiny, light-powered wires to modulate brain's electrical signals

21.02.2018 | Life Sciences

The “Holy Grail” of peptide chemistry: Making peptide active agents available orally

21.02.2018 | Life Sciences

Atomic structure of ultrasound material not what anyone expected

21.02.2018 | Materials Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>