Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

'Robotic physiotherapist' could treat patients and cut waiting times

12.02.2007
A robotic system to treat physiotherapy patients with lower limb problems could lead to a decrease in waiting lists and the ability for patients to be treated outside of clinics.

The prototype NeXOS system can be instructed to remember and repeat specific limb movements which have been programmed by a physiotherapist. This removes the need for the physiotherapist to manipulate the patient's limbs manually, so that they would not need to be present when the exercises were taking place.

It is also possible to alter the range of movement, speed, resistance, and amount of exercises, ensuring that each programme is individually tailored to the patient's needs.

NeXOS remotely feeds information directly back to the physiotherapist, so they could monitor their patient's progress from another location, and could even adapt the exercise programme remotely.

This opens up the possibility for patients to be treated with the system in non-clinical settings such as their own homes, gyms and sports centres.

The project is the result of a collaboration between Sheffield Hallam University, the University of Sheffield, Barnsley Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust and the University of Abertay Dundee.

Dr Sue Mawson, from the Centre for Heath and Social Care Research at Sheffield Hallam University and one of the research physiotherapists involved in developing the system explains, "The NeXOS system needs to be trialled clinically, but offers the potential for physiotherapists to effectively treat more patients. It requires the expertise of a physiotherapy professional to assess the patients needs, programme the exercises and to analyse the data to check its effectiveness, but takes away the need for all treatment to be conducted face-to-face, in one-to-one sessions.

"This system is also good news for patients as it will allow them to schedule their therapy more easily to fit in with their lives, rather than having to meet appointment times with therapists. It will also cut waiting times for treatment.

"The beauty of the system is that the therapist would be able to monitor progress, adapt the programme remotely, and to easily assess when a patient needs a follow-up session face-to-face."

Further research is planned on ways in which therapists could use the technology more effectively either as a teaching tool for e-learning or as an adjunct to rehabilitation.

Lorna Branton | alfa
Further information:
http://www.shu.ac.uk

More articles from Medical Engineering:

nachricht Heart examinations: Miniature particle accelerator saves on contrast agents
27.02.2017 | Technische Universität München

nachricht Novel breast tomosynthesis technique reduces screening recall rate
21.02.2017 | Radiological Society of North America

All articles from Medical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Safe glide at total engine failure with ELA-inside

On January 15, 2009, Chesley B. Sullenberger was celebrated world-wide: after the two engines had failed due to bird strike, he and his flight crew succeeded after a glide flight with an Airbus A320 in ditching on the Hudson River. All 155 people on board were saved.

On January 15, 2009, Chesley B. Sullenberger was celebrated world-wide: after the two engines had failed due to bird strike, he and his flight crew succeeded...

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

New pop-up strategy inspired by cuts, not folds

27.02.2017 | Materials Sciences

Sandia uses confined nanoparticles to improve hydrogen storage materials performance

27.02.2017 | Interdisciplinary Research

Decoding the genome's cryptic language

27.02.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>