Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

New Microscope for Eye Surgery

04.12.2006
Leica M620 F18 Combines Precision With Compact Design and Easy Operation

Although modern medical technology has reduced the time it takes to perform ophthalmic surgery, the workload has steadily increased as more operations are performed per day with less time between cases. To meet the needs of the busy surgical suite, Leica Microsystems has designed the Leica M620 F18, which combines easy set-up and control with high-quality optics, precise illumination, a compact, durable design, at a better price/performance ratio than ever before.


Stable, intensive Red Reflex

Using Leica’s high-precision OptiChrome™ optics and new Direct Halogen Illumination, the surgeon sees a clear, sharply-focused image throughout the entire operation. The sterile jalousie device allows the surgeon to adjust illumination and contrast to the unique physical characteristics of the patient, such as extreme eye pigmentation. The result is completely stable Red Reflex and exceptional intensity.

Full control via touchscreen and user profiles

The logically designed touchscreen is integrated with the stand and clearly displays all settings at a glance to allow fast and easy operation of all microscope controls. User profiles can be programmed for up to four surgeons. Each surgeon can recall his or her individual settings at the press of a button.

Always ready for the next case with Auto Reset

If the Leica M620 F18 is returned to the vertical home position after an operation, the start parameters automatically reset, and the microscope is immediately ready for the next patient. Leica’s Auto Reset function saves valuable time and makes work easier for the entire surgical team. Healthier posture with Leica’s Ergotube Leica has designed the M620 F18 to minimize fatigue because doctors and medical staff spend long working hours at the microscope. Leica’s ergonomic eyetube is designed specifically for cataract surgery and allows a viewing angle of 5 to 25°. If req uired, a co-viewing attachment can be added which rotates along three axes for flexible positioning to give an assistant room to maneuver, even in cramped working conditions.

Smooth movement, easy maneuverability, and long reach

The compact stand and high-quality rollers ensure smooth movement and easy maneuverability. With the long-reach swingarm, the Leica M620 F18 can easily be positioned in the operating room. Using a video adapter such as the Leica Video Zoom Adapter, any video system can be connected to the beamsplitter for documenting and archiving the images. Additional accessories, e.g., for observing the retina or laser filters, easily integrate with the system. Leica Microsystems offers a wide range of binocular tubes and objectives to offer a microscope configuration to fit every individual surgeon’s needs.

Leica Microsystems is a leading global designer and producer of innovative, high-tech, precision optical systems for the analysis of microstructures. It is one of the market leaders in each of its business areas: Microscopy, Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy, Imaging Systems, Specimen Preparation and Medical Equipment. The company manufactures a broad range of products for numerous applications requiring microscopic imaging, measurement, and analysis. It also offers system solutions for life science including biotechnology and medicine, research and development of raw materials, and industrial quality assurance. The company is represented in over 100 countries with 8 manufacturing facilities in 6 countries, sales and service organizations in 19 countries and an international network of dealers. With its workforce of about 3,200 employees it made turnover of US$ 597m in 2005. The international management is headquartered in Wetzlar, Germany.

Mylène Alt | Leica Microsystems
Further information:
http://www.leica-microsystems.com/Surgical_Microscopes

More articles from Medical Engineering:

nachricht UCLA engineers use deep learning to reconstruct holograms and improve optical microscopy
22.11.2017 | University of California - Los Angeles

nachricht First transcatheter implant for diastolic heart failure successful
16.11.2017 | The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center

All articles from Medical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: New proton record: Researchers measure magnetic moment with greatest possible precision

High-precision measurement of the g-factor eleven times more precise than before / Results indicate a strong similarity between protons and antiprotons

The magnetic moment of an individual proton is inconceivably small, but can still be quantified. The basis for undertaking this measurement was laid over ten...

Im Focus: Frictional Heat Powers Hydrothermal Activity on Enceladus

Computer simulation shows how the icy moon heats water in a porous rock core

Heat from the friction of rocks caused by tidal forces could be the “engine” for the hydrothermal activity on Saturn's moon Enceladus. This presupposes that...

Im Focus: Nanoparticles help with malaria diagnosis – new rapid test in development

The WHO reports an estimated 429,000 malaria deaths each year. The disease mostly affects tropical and subtropical regions and in particular the African continent. The Fraunhofer Institute for Silicate Research ISC teamed up with the Fraunhofer Institute for Molecular Biology and Applied Ecology IME and the Institute of Tropical Medicine at the University of Tübingen for a new test method to detect malaria parasites in blood. The idea of the research project “NanoFRET” is to develop a highly sensitive and reliable rapid diagnostic test so that patient treatment can begin as early as possible.

Malaria is caused by parasites transmitted by mosquito bite. The most dangerous form of malaria is malaria tropica. Left untreated, it is fatal in most cases....

Im Focus: A “cosmic snake” reveals the structure of remote galaxies

The formation of stars in distant galaxies is still largely unexplored. For the first time, astron-omers at the University of Geneva have now been able to closely observe a star system six billion light-years away. In doing so, they are confirming earlier simulations made by the University of Zurich. One special effect is made possible by the multiple reflections of images that run through the cosmos like a snake.

Today, astronomers have a pretty accurate idea of how stars were formed in the recent cosmic past. But do these laws also apply to older galaxies? For around a...

Im Focus: Visual intelligence is not the same as IQ

Just because someone is smart and well-motivated doesn't mean he or she can learn the visual skills needed to excel at tasks like matching fingerprints, interpreting medical X-rays, keeping track of aircraft on radar displays or forensic face matching.

That is the implication of a new study which shows for the first time that there is a broad range of differences in people's visual ability and that these...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Ecology Across Borders: International conference brings together 1,500 ecologists

15.11.2017 | Event News

Road into laboratory: Users discuss biaxial fatigue-testing for car and truck wheel

15.11.2017 | Event News

#Berlin5GWeek: The right network for Industry 4.0

30.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

IceCube experiment finds Earth can block high-energy particles from nuclear reactions

24.11.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

A 'half-hearted' solution to one-sided heart failure

24.11.2017 | Health and Medicine

Heidelberg Researchers Study Unique Underwater Stalactites

24.11.2017 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>