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Siemens Exhibits Ultrasound Technology to Lead the Way into the Future

06.03.2006


Siemens Medical Solutions remains true to its course of innovation: The company works continuously on future technologies and solutions for ultrasound imaging. The newest innovations are presented by Siemens at the European Congress of Radiology (ECR) in Vienna from March 3 to 7, 2006. Siemens will highlight Cadence CPS technology (Contrast Pulse Sequencing) which provides excellent contrast detection and good specificity, and is also the enabling technology for molecular medicine. In addition, the newest generation transducers will be shown, surpassing their predecessors in ergonomics and application. Another technological advance is HRCF or High Resolution Color Flow. This unique technology applies chirp-coded excitation to Color Doppler improving the quality of examinations. All innovations and systems from Siemens add to the continuous effort to simplify system operation for the user, to improve their workflow, and to expand the application range for ultrasound technology.

Cadence CPS technology provides excellent contrast sensitivity and specificity to ultrasound molecular medicine. Preclinical studies show the technology’s considerable potential for additional clinical information in evaluation of inflammation, angiogenesis, and thrombosis. The upcoming Encompass III release on the Acuson Sequoia will make CPS available for endocavitary use, expanding its clinical utility. Transducers have seen technological advances as well: It is expected that silicon ultrasound technology will provide for efficient 4D imaging in a broad range of applications.

This provides the physician even greater detailed visualization during conventional and volumetric 4D ultrasound imaging than previously possible. Added to this plus are considerable workflow improvements, e.g. the same transducer can be used for both, 2D and 4D applications. In general, these silicon-based transducers will be more ergonomic, and therefore more comfortable to use. Siemens is beginning to integrate this technology into its product spectrum, the respective products will be commercially available in the next two years.

The introduction of the Encompass II release for the Sequoia ultrasound platform is characterized by HRCF (High Resolution Color Flow), an innovation that greatly improves spatial resolution and sensitivity through the use of chirp-coded excitation applied to color Doppler. The outstanding performance of HRCF will be specifically benefit the following applications: abdomen and obstetrics, kidney examinations as well as examinations of peripheral vessels, tumors and smaller structures such as the breast, thyroid gland, and testicles.

“Our strategy consists of integrated applications and product platforms with the newest applications that effectively improve the workflow of our customers,” explains Klaus Hambüchen, head of Siemens Medical’s ultrasound division. “Especially the introduction of Encompass II with its noticeable improvements in efficiency and performance in clinical workflow is of special benefit to our customers. The known excellence of Acuson Sequoia’s image quality is the greatest advantage we can offer them.”

Siemens Medical Solutions is one of the world’s largest suppliers to the healthcare industry. The company is known for bringing together innovative medical technologies, healthcare information systems, management consulting, and support services, to help customers achieve tangible, sustainable, clinical and financial outcomes. From imaging systems for diagnosis, to therapy equipment for treatment, to patient monitors to hearing instruments and beyond, Siemens innovations contribute to the health and well-being of people across the globe, while improving operational efficiencies and optimizing workflow in hospitals, clinics, home health agencies, and doctors’ offices. Employing approximately 33.000 people worldwide and operating in more than 120 countries, Siemens Medical Solutions reported sales of 7.6 billion EUR, orders of 8.6 billion EUR and group profit of 1 billion EUR for fiscal 2005.

Axel Wieczorek | Siemens AG
Further information:
http://www.siemens.com/medical

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