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Telemetry monitoring - Dräger announces first implementation of new wireless Infinity® M300 patient-worn monitor

11.07.2008
Innovative system addresses challenges of telemetry monitoring: viewing patient data at the patient’s side, alarm management, and cost of disposable batteries

Dräger today announced the first implementations of its new Infinity® M300 patient-worn monitor. The new telemetry system has been installed at major hospitals in the United States and in Germany.


Infinity M300 provides the performance of a full-size patient monitor, packaged in a compact patient-worn telemetry device for adult and pediatric patients. This new design supports hospitals in their initiatives to mobilize patients as early as possible in order to accelerate the healing process.

In addition to monitoring ECG and SpO2, the device has built-in algorithms to enhance ECG processing and reduce false alarms – such as pacer detection software and ACE® (Arrhythmia Classification Expert), an arrhythmia analysis tool.

Infinity M300 can run on a hospital’s existing 802.11 b/g network – saving the expense of requiring a separate wireless network for the telemetry system. Infinity M300 addresses the three major challenges of telemetry monitoring. The first is viewing patient information at the patient’s side. Unlike traditional telemetry devices which have no screen, Infinity M300 has a color display that shows the patient’s ECG for all monitored leads, heart rate, SpO2, and electrode status – enabling the clinical staff to access monitored data and react promptly without having to go to the central monitoring station. The display also shows patient demographics to help confirm the patient’s identification before giving medication, taking blood samples, or performing treatments.

The second telemetry challenge is hearing and responding to alarms. Infinity M300 has built-in alarming and alarm controls, which provide alarm alerts both at the patient’s side and the Infinity CentralStation, Dräger’s central monitoring workstation. The built-in display helps the clinician assess alarms and respond accordingly.

The third challenge of telemetry monitoring is the cost and effort associated with disposable batteries. Infinity M300 has a built-in battery, which can be recharged via a bedside charger while the patient is wearing the device, or at a multi-device charger at the central monitoring station.

“Infinity M300 represents a major innovation in telemetry monitoring. We’re very excited about the system’s potential to help address the challenges of today’s busy ambulatory environments,” said Dina LaTulippe, Director of Product Management, Central Monitoring Solutions at Monitoring, Systems & IT in Andover, Massachusetts, USA. “Because Infinity M300 has a built-in display and alarms, it enables the clinical staff to be alerted to patient conditions without having to use additional devices.”

About Dräger

Founded in 1889, Drägerwerk AG & Co. KGaA is an international leader in the fields of medical and safety technology. Dräger products protect, support and save human life. In 2007, the Group achieved sales of €1,819.5 million worldwide and an EBIT of €151.9 million. Today, Dräger employs around 10,000 people in more than 70 subsidiaries worldwide and has representation in around 190 countries. The Dräger Medical subsidiary offers products, services and integrated system solutions which accompany the patient throughout the care process – Emergency Care, Perioperative Care, Critical Care or Perinatal care and Home Mechanical Ventilation.

Contact for Trade Press
Malte Blombach
Tel.: +49 451 882-1976
E-Mail: malte.blombach@draeger.com

Burkard Dillig | Drägerwerk AG & Co. KGaA
Further information:
http://www.draeger.com

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