Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

University of Ulster Spin-out Unveils Breakthrough Vital Sign Monitors

24.06.2008
Innovative medical technology developed by a University of Ulster spinout company is set to transform the way doctors monitor their patients’ hearts and other vital signs, it was revealed today.

A tiny device invented by spinout company ST+D will enable clinicians to assess a patient’s condition irrespective of where they are. The “no wires” technology will also help to reduce patients’ time in hospital and free up beds more quickly.

“It won’t matter whether the patient is in hospital, at home recuperating - or holidaying in, say, Spain or South Africa,” according to chief executive Michael Caulfield. “Doctors will be able to click onto a website and review the state of their patients’ health.”

The breakthrough is based on a disposable adhesive electrode patch worn on the patient’s chest. A small electronic unit with wireless technology is attached which sends processed signals back to the doctor.

The company has revealed that a specific version of the device is now being developed by ST+D and clinically trialled in collaboration with the Royal Victoria Hospital in a project which has been funded by the Wellcome Trust, the UK’s largest medical research charity. This programme-related investment by the Trust is the first of its kind for a private sector business in Northern Ireland.

The device is the outcome of pioneering research by the principal investigators Professors John Anderson, Jim McLaughlin and Eric McAdams at the University of Ulster’s Nanotechnology and Integrated Bioengineering Centre (NIBEC) who are founders and directors of ST+D. It is hoped that following the product development phase its manufacture will take place in Belfast, leading to new jobs at the award-winning Northern Ireland firm.

Ted Bianco, Director of Technology Transfer at the Wellcome Trust, said: “Our translation awards are designed to facilitate the development of medical products in areas of unmet need in healthcare. In this way, the Wellcome Trust aims to bridge the gap between a good idea and an innovative tool with the potential to improve the lives of patients.”

“This device certainly has the potential to change the way doctors monitor their patients’ hearts. Testing it in a hospital environment is the first step to validating the technology and gaining useful insights into how it might best be deployed, both in the clinical setting and beyond.”

The 18-month roll-out period is attracting international attention, according to Michael Caulfield, whose company specialising in wireless “vital signs” medical technology is based at Heron Road in Belfast.

“It will free up hospital beds because of earlier release of heart patients and cut down on in-patients’ appointments, while at the same time giving early warning of any problems,” he added. “While it’s not designed to provide emergency alerts this technology will certainly warn the clinician of one that may possibly be impending – and of which the patient is unaware. This technology solution will be of significant interest to healthcare organisations on a global basis”

The sensor includes on-board intelligence allowing it to monitor and record irregular heart events and to capture heart data for periods of time before and after those events. Future versions of the device will also measure the wearer’s respiratory rate, temperature and oxygen in the blood.

Within a hospital environment, this device will work from up to 10 metres away, un-tethering the patient from wires. When patients are discharged the clinician will have the option to provide the patient with a small handset suitable for bedside table, pocket or handbag which will pick up the signals from the patch using GPRS, (the global system for mobile communications) and transmit the signals onwards to a doctor's computer via the world-wide web.

David Young | alfa
Further information:
http://www.ulster.ac.uk

More articles from Medical Engineering:

nachricht New technique makes brain scans better
22.06.2017 | Massachusetts Institute of Technology

nachricht New technology enables effective simultaneous testing for multiple blood-borne pathogens
13.06.2017 | Elsevier

All articles from Medical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Making Waves

Computer scientists use wave packet theory to develop realistic, detailed water wave simulations in real time. Their results will be presented at this year’s SIGGRAPH conference.

Think about the last time you were at a lake, river, or the ocean. Remember the ripples of the water, the waves crashing against the rocks, the wake following...

Im Focus: Can we see monkeys from space? Emerging technologies to map biodiversity

An international team of scientists has proposed a new multi-disciplinary approach in which an array of new technologies will allow us to map biodiversity and the risks that wildlife is facing at the scale of whole landscapes. The findings are published in Nature Ecology and Evolution. This international research is led by the Kunming Institute of Zoology from China, University of East Anglia, University of Leicester and the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research.

Using a combination of satellite and ground data, the team proposes that it is now possible to map biodiversity with an accuracy that has not been previously...

Im Focus: Climate satellite: Tracking methane with robust laser technology

Heatwaves in the Arctic, longer periods of vegetation in Europe, severe floods in West Africa – starting in 2021, scientists want to explore the emissions of the greenhouse gas methane with the German-French satellite MERLIN. This is made possible by a new robust laser system of the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT in Aachen, which achieves unprecedented measurement accuracy.

Methane is primarily the result of the decomposition of organic matter. The gas has a 25 times greater warming potential than carbon dioxide, but is not as...

Im Focus: How protons move through a fuel cell

Hydrogen is regarded as the energy source of the future: It is produced with solar power and can be used to generate heat and electricity in fuel cells. Empa researchers have now succeeded in decoding the movement of hydrogen ions in crystals – a key step towards more efficient energy conversion in the hydrogen industry of tomorrow.

As charge carriers, electrons and ions play the leading role in electrochemical energy storage devices and converters such as batteries and fuel cells. Proton...

Im Focus: A unique data centre for cosmological simulations

Scientists from the Excellence Cluster Universe at the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität Munich have establised "Cosmowebportal", a unique data centre for cosmological simulations located at the Leibniz Supercomputing Centre (LRZ) of the Bavarian Academy of Sciences. The complete results of a series of large hydrodynamical cosmological simulations are available, with data volumes typically exceeding several hundred terabytes. Scientists worldwide can interactively explore these complex simulations via a web interface and directly access the results.

With current telescopes, scientists can observe our Universe’s galaxies and galaxy clusters and their distribution along an invisible cosmic web. From the...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Plants are networkers

19.06.2017 | Event News

Digital Survival Training for Executives

13.06.2017 | Event News

Global Learning Council Summit 2017

13.06.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Nanostructures taste the rainbow

29.06.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

New technique unveils 'matrix' inside tissues and tumors

29.06.2017 | Life Sciences

Cystic fibrosis alters the structure of mucus in airways

29.06.2017 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>