Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Pin point radiotherapy procedure proved success for breast cancer

28.02.2008
A large scale trial conducted at the European Institute of Oncology (IEO) in Milan has proved a novel radiotherapy procedure to be a great success both in terms of medical results and cost effectiveness.

The study, published today (27 Feb) in the peer-reviewed journal ecancermedicalscience, examined the use of Electron Intraoperative Therapy (ELIOT), which shortens the radiotherapy course from six weeks to one single session during surgery.

The conventional treatment for early breast cancer is breast conserving surgery (BCS) followed by a 5-7 week course of radiotherapy. However many women still undergo mastectomy because they do not have easy access to postoperative radiotherapy centres.

As 85% of local relapses after BCS occur near the initial site of disease there has been an increased interest in using partial breast irradiation (PBI) directed to the tissue immediately surrounding the site of tumour removal.

Investigators have evaluated the use of ELIOT alone for early-stage breast cancer since 1999. This technique uses radiotherapy machines kept or easily moved in the operating theatre. After removal of the tumour, a high accuracy, high dose radiation pulse is delivered to the breast tissue surrounding the site.

Since it was first piloted by the IEO in 1999, ELIOT has been given to 1246 patients, with an overall survival rate at five years of 96.5%. Only 24 out of the 1246 cases (1.9%) saw a breast-cancer related event after this period.

Apart from this success, the system has several other advantages: Cosmetic damage is greatly limited and post-op plastic surgery is easily conducted.

The flexible nature of the radiotherapy machine and its presence during surgery means that additional doses of radiotherapy can be given if needed for specific reasons.

Furthermore, the complete protection against radiation provided by the combination of pin-point doses and protective metal disk means that side effects from unwanted radiation are abolished.

The main advantage, however, is for those patients living in areas remote from radiotherapy centres, who would otherwise have to travel everyday for six weeks, and often decide on complete breast removal to avoid the huge stress of such an undertaking.

The investigators state that their results “confirmed the positive impact of ELIOT on patient quality of life: ELIOT is feasible and well accepted. We are waiting for the long-term results on local control from the ongoing randomised trial in progress at our institute to decide whether to adopt the technique in daily standard practice. However, as the data from the present large series are reassuring (97% of local control and 98.8% survival at 5 years) we believe that, at least for women living far from radiotherapy centres and with minimal risk of local recurrence (age > 50 and primary carcinoma

Professor Gordon McVie, of the IEO, added “this is the largest experience in the world of sequential patients treated in a phase II trial with intra-operative radiotherapy. Its unprecedented size and positive results gives great hope for both this technique and breast cancer patients worldwide”.

Linda Cairns | alfa
Further information:
http://www.ecancermedicalscience.com

More articles from Medical Engineering:

nachricht 3-D visualization of the pancreas -- new tool in diabetes research
15.03.2017 | Umea University

nachricht New PET radiotracer identifies inflammation in life-threatening atherosclerosis
02.03.2017 | Society of Nuclear Medicine

All articles from Medical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

Im Focus: Researchers Imitate Molecular Crowding in Cells

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to simulate these confined natural conditions in artificial vesicles for the first time. As reported in the academic journal Small, the results are offering better insight into the development of nanoreactors and artificial organelles.

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Argon is not the 'dope' for metallic hydrogen

24.03.2017 | Materials Sciences

Astronomers find unexpected, dust-obscured star formation in distant galaxy

24.03.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Gravitational wave kicks monster black hole out of galactic core

24.03.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>