Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Keep the precious eye in check

05.07.2011
PolyU’s innovative secured retinal imaging system for diabetic care

People with diabetes want to stay active and lead a healthy life free from complications such as kidney disease, heart disease and stroke. However, many patients cannot escape from the common threat of Diabetic Retinopathy, a sort of damage to the blood vessels in the retina caused by poor blood circulation, which can inflict permanent vision damage and eventually lead to blindness. Our eye seldom complains before vision damage is felt. Therefore, early detection through routine eye screening can spare the sight.


The retinal imaging system
Copyright : The Hong Kong Polytechnic University

That is why researchers from PolyU's Department of Computing have recently developed a smart retinal imaging solution that makes it incredibly simple to keep the eye closely monitored. Unlike fundus cameras used in conventional eye examination, this novel instrument integrates leading-edge computing technologies into advanced cameras to provide automated detection of diabetic retinopathy. Featuring a unique retina image analyser, the system reads digital photos of the retina and check for broken blood vessels and other signs of diabetes damage within minutes. In the absence of eye doctors or specialists, it automatically makes diagnosis and spots patients who are in need of doctor referral for a full eye examination. This sort of simple operation opens up the procedure to less trained technicians. Retina photos can also be printed off and passed on to doctors.

All people with diabetes are at risk for Diabetic Retinopathy. In United States alone, about 40% of diabetes patients are being affected by diabetic retinopathy. Therefore, early detection is important because diabetic retinopathy can be reversed or stopped with a simple surgery at its onset. Sadly to say, some countries like France is lack of a national screening program which results in a steady rise in visual handicaps related to diabetes.

Accurate diagnosis relies on high quality retinal image. Our new system incorporates imaging enhancing features such as auto-focus function and well-balance illumination, thus intelligently adjusting the camera lens to eyeball of any diameters. In spite of poor patient fixations or other difficulties, it produces ultra-clear pictures that can be hardly achieved through manual control.

In addition, the automatic system can capture retinal images without dilating our pupils, allowing clinics and hospitals to perform the scanning faster. The principal investigator of this project Professor Jane You said, “This sort of quick test will allow more people to have the initial eye screening. It would be a pity seeing patients fall through the cracks and miss the chance of early and effective intervention.” The new imaging technology marks a significant advancement in eye care that will benefit millions of diabetics around the world.

Another feature of this innovation is its advanced capabilities in archive management that allows retinal images to be captured, stored and uniquely associated with a patient to produce a legitimate proof of the disease for insurance claims. Besides, data security functions are also available to forestall any unauthorized access and misuse of personal data and medical records. Patients can therefore trust their digitalized medical history with eye clinics and hospitals.

Automatic diagnosis point the way to the future of diabetic eye care. As an easier, faster and highly effective eye screening tool, this comprehensive system has just snapped a Gold Medal and a Special Prize in the 39th International Exhibition of Inventions of Geneva in April this year. Professor You added, "These awards testify our efforts in protecting patients against vision loss. In the near future, computing technologies will be the drivers of medical breakthroughs. Therefore, PolyU's Department of Computing will work towards this goal and keep on inventing more and better ways to manage other chronic diseases."

Reference
Natacha Germain, Bodgan Galusca, Nilanjana Deb-Joardar, Luc Millot, Pierre Manoli, Gilles Thuret, Philippe Gain, and Bruno Estour, “No Loss of Chance of Diabetic Retinopathy Screening by Endocrinologists With a Digital Fundus Camera”, Diabetes Care March 2011 vol. 34 no. 3 580-585.

Gold Medal with Jury's Commendation and Special Prize at 39th International Exhibition of Inventions of Geneva

Copyright : The Hong Kong Polytechnic University

Wilfred Lai | Research asia research news
Further information:
http://www.polyu.edu.hk

More articles from Medical Engineering:

nachricht An LED-based device for imaging radiation induced skin damage
30.03.2017 | The Optical Society

nachricht A Challenging European Research Project to Develop New Tiny Microscopes
28.03.2017 | Technische Universität Braunschweig

All articles from Medical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: A Challenging European Research Project to Develop New Tiny Microscopes

The Institute of Semiconductor Technology and the Institute of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, both members of the Laboratory for Emerging Nanometrology (LENA), at Technische Universität Braunschweig are partners in a new European research project entitled ChipScope, which aims to develop a completely new and extremely small optical microscope capable of observing the interior of living cells in real time. A consortium of 7 partners from 5 countries will tackle this issue with very ambitious objectives during a four-year research program.

To demonstrate the usefulness of this new scientific tool, at the end of the project the developed chip-sized microscope will be used to observe in real-time...

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

'On-off switch' brings researchers a step closer to potential HIV vaccine

30.03.2017 | Health and Medicine

Penn studies find promise for innovations in liquid biopsies

30.03.2017 | Health and Medicine

An LED-based device for imaging radiation induced skin damage

30.03.2017 | Medical Engineering

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>