Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

PolyU develops novel computer intelligence system for acute stroke detection

20.05.2015

The Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU) has developed a novel computer-aided detection system for acute stroke using computer intelligence technology. The detection accuracy is 90%, which is as high as that conducted by specialists, but at a much reduced time from 10-15 minutes to 3 minutes.

The Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU) has developed a novel computer-aided detection system for acute stroke using computer intelligence technology. Reading 80-100 computer images, the system is able to detect if the patient was struck by ischemic stroke or haemorrhagic stroke.

The detection accuracy is 90%, which is as high as that conducted by specialists, but at a much reduced time from 10-15 minutes to 3 minutes. The new system serves as a second opinion for frontline medical doctors, enabling timely and appropriate treatment for stroke patients.

Providing treatment to acute stroke patients within the golden hours of stroke treatment, i.e., 3 hours of stroke onset, is vital to saving lives. However, stroke specialists do not work around the clock, increasing the risk of misdiagnosis and delayed diagnosis of acute stroke.

This novel system which analyses brain scans could help save lives by assisting non-specialists in diagnosis by providing them a second opinion. Timely diagnosis and treatment within 3 hours of stroke onset also minimise damage.

Developed by experts from the Department of Health Technology and Informatics at PolyU, the computer-aided detection for stroke (CAD stroke) technology combines sophisticated calculations, artificial intelligence and pathology to help medical professionals achieve speedy and accurate diagnosis.

The first part of the system is an algorithm for automatic extraction of areas of suspected region of interest. A computed tomography (CT) scan uses X-rays to take pictures of the brain in slices. When blood flow to the brain is blocked, an area of the brain turns softer or decreases in density due to insufficient blood flow, pointing to an ischemic stroke.

The second part is an artificial neural network to classify region of interest for stroke. The CAD stroke computer “learns” the defining features of stroke, and performs automated reasoning. CT scans are fed into the CAD stroke computer, which will make sophisticated calculations and comparisons to locate areas suspected of insufficient blood flow. It detects where the images look “abnormal”, and will be highlighted for doctors’ review.

Early changes including loss of insular ribbon, loss of sulcus and dense MCA signs will appear as “abnormalities”, helping doctors determine if blood clots are present. As our system is able to detect subtle change in density, it is also able to detect haemorrhagic stroke which is presented as increase in tissue density.

Equipped with the built-in artificial intelligence feature, the CAD stroke technology can learn by experience. With every scan passing through, along with feedback from stroke specialists, the application will improve its accuracy over time.

The life-saving application can also detect subtle and minute changes in the brain that would escape the eye of even an experienced specialist, slashing the chances of missed diagnosis. False-positive and false-negative cases, and other less serious conditions that mimic a stroke can also be ruled out, allowing a fully-informed decision to be made.


Associated links
Hong Kong PolyU press release

The Hong Kong Polytechnic University | ResearchSEA
Further information:
http://www.researchsea.com

More articles from Medical Engineering:

nachricht Electrode shape improves neurostimulation for small targets
25.04.2018 | Purdue University

nachricht Novel PET imaging agent could help guide therapy for brain diseases
03.04.2018 | Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging

All articles from Medical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: BAM@Hannover Messe: innovative 3D printing method for space flight

At the Hannover Messe 2018, the Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und-prüfung (BAM) will show how, in the future, astronauts could produce their own tools or spare parts in zero gravity using 3D printing. This will reduce, weight and transport costs for space missions. Visitors can experience the innovative additive manufacturing process live at the fair.

Powder-based additive manufacturing in zero gravity is the name of the project in which a component is produced by applying metallic powder layers and then...

Im Focus: Molecules Brilliantly Illuminated

Physicists at the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics, which is jointly run by Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität and the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, have developed a high-power laser system that generates ultrashort pulses of light covering a large share of the mid-infrared spectrum. The researchers envisage a wide range of applications for the technology – in the early diagnosis of cancer, for instance.

Molecules are the building blocks of life. Like all other organisms, we are made of them. They control our biorhythm, and they can also reflect our state of...

Im Focus: Spider silk key to new bone-fixing composite

University of Connecticut researchers have created a biodegradable composite made of silk fibers that can be used to repair broken load-bearing bones without the complications sometimes presented by other materials.

Repairing major load-bearing bones such as those in the leg can be a long and uncomfortable process.

Im Focus: Writing and deleting magnets with lasers

Study published in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces is the outcome of an international effort that included teams from Dresden and Berlin in Germany, and the US.

Scientists at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) together with colleagues from the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) and the University of Virginia...

Im Focus: Gamma-ray flashes from plasma filaments

Novel highly efficient and brilliant gamma-ray source: Based on model calculations, physicists of the Max PIanck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg propose a novel method for an efficient high-brilliance gamma-ray source. A giant collimated gamma-ray pulse is generated from the interaction of a dense ultra-relativistic electron beam with a thin solid conductor. Energetic gamma-rays are copiously produced as the electron beam splits into filaments while propagating across the conductor. The resulting gamma-ray energy and flux enable novel experiments in nuclear and fundamental physics.

The typical wavelength of light interacting with an object of the microcosm scales with the size of this object. For atoms, this ranges from visible light to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Invitation to the upcoming "Current Topics in Bioinformatics: Big Data in Genomics and Medicine"

13.04.2018 | Event News

Unique scope of UV LED technologies and applications presented in Berlin: ICULTA-2018

12.04.2018 | Event News

IWOLIA: A conference bringing together German Industrie 4.0 and French Industrie du Futur

09.04.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Getting electrons to move in a semiconductor

25.04.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Reconstructing what makes us tick

25.04.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Cheap 3-D printer can produce self-folding materials

25.04.2018 | Information Technology

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>