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New SPECT System scans virtually every patient and minimizes costs

20.10.2014
  • Smallest room size requirement in its class*
  • High throughput and exceptional detector flexibility
  • Industry-leading image resolution

Siemens Healthcare introduces the Symbia Evo Excel SPECT system at the 27th Congress of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM). The system is a new version of the successful Symbia E. Symbia Evo Excel combines industry-leading SPECT image resolution and detector sensitivity with the smallest room size requirement in its class*.


Symbia Evo Excel combines industry-leading SPECT image resolution and detector sensitivity with a small room size requirement thus designed to fit into almost any existing nuclear medicine exam room.

Designed to fit into almost any existing nuclear medicine exam room, Symbia Evo Excel virtually eliminates costs associated with room renovation and expansion. With a high-capacity patient bed, larger bore size compared to previous systems and highly flexible detectors, the system is optimized for obese or critically ill patients and increases the variety of applications a healthcare institution can offer.

With a room size requirement up to 29 percent smaller than for conventional systems in its class*, Symbia Evo Excel fits in a room as small as 3.60 m (11 ft 8 in) x 4.57 m (15 ft). The system improves patient comfort with a 30 percent larger bore [102 cm (40.2 in)], compared to its predecessor, and a high-capacity patient bed that supports patients up to 227 kg (500 lbs).

The bed also improves accessibility for patients with limited mobility with a convenient minimum access height of 53 cm (21 in). The exceptional detector flexibility allows imaging of critically ill patients on a gurney or in a hospital bed. Additionally, the short tunnel length and maximum scan length of up to 200 cm (6 ft 7 in) improves patient comfort for claustrophobic and tall patients.

Symbia Evo Excel's full range of versatility offers the ability to scan a broad range of patients for a variety of applications. The detector heads easily rotate into numerous positions, including caudal/cephalic tilt, providing comprehensive imaging configurations for general purpose, cardiology, oncology and neurology studies.

"Symbia Evo Excel addresses the pressing demands of today's healthcare environment as a cost-effective modernization option for nuclear medicine departments looking to avoid renovation of existing infrastructure," said James Williams, CEO, Siemens Healthcare, Molecular Imaging. Symbia Evo Excel is a multi-purpose, versatile SPECT system for hospitals and outpatient centers with general nuclear medicine imaging demands. It can also be upgraded as needs and budgets evolve over time.

* Entry level SPECT scanners for general nuclear medicine imaging, excluding organ-specific / dedicated scanners.

For further information on Siemens Molecular Imaging, please visit http://www.healthcare.siemens.com/

Siemens AG (Berlin and Munich) is a global technology powerhouse that has stood for engineering excellence, innovation, quality, reliability and internationality for more than 165 years. The company is active in more than 200 countries, focusing on the areas of electrification, automation and digitalization. One of the world's largest producers of energy-efficient, resource-saving technologies, Siemens is No. 1 in offshore wind turbine construction, a leading supplier of combined cycle turbines for power generation, a leading provider of power transmission solutions and a pioneer in infrastructure solutions and automation and software solutions for industry. The company is also a leading supplier of medical imaging equipment – such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging systems – and a leader in laboratory diagnostics as well as clinical IT. In fiscal 2013, which ended on September 30, 2013, revenue from continuing operations totaled €75.9 billion and income from continuing operations €4.2 billion. At the end of September 2013, Siemens had around 362,000 employees worldwide on the basis of continuing operations. Further information is available on the Internet at www.siemens.com.

The products/features here mentioned are not commercially available in all countries. Due to regulatory reasons their future availability cannot be guaranteed. Please contact your local Siemens organization for further details.

Reference Number: PR2014100017HCEN

Contact

Ms. Anja Uhlendorff
Healthcare

Siemens AG

Henkestr. 127

91052  Erlangen

Germany

Tel: +49 (9131) 84-6188

Anja Uhlendorff | Siemens Healthcare

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