Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Networking data and sharing knowledge using new solutions from Siemens

06.05.2014
  • i.s.h.med medication solution package supports path toward digital charts
  • New Soarian module for efficient processes in intensive care
  • Unified Information Management bundles and distributes data

Each patient's chart is a key tool for doctors and caregivers in a hospital environment. It provides information on matters such as blood pressure, pulse rate and medication – in other words, the patient's overall condition. Charts are still usually written by hand, and are therefore prone to error and of only limited value.


Unlike dedicated departmental systems for intensive care, the "Critical Care" module of the hospital information system (HIS) Soarian is fully incorporated into the HIS. This means that information from intensive care can be viewed in the recovery or regular wards, depending on authorization levels. For instance, staff there can read – from their usual HIS user interface – what medications the patient has received and how the patient's vital parameters have changed, and thus draw conclusions for further treatment.

This is why Siemens supports hospitals on the way toward digital charts using its new HIS solutions. A new package of solutions is available for i.s.h.med in Germany right now to help with medication. This package enables the drug treatment process which is displayed in the digital chart to be performed paperlessly. The processes involved are pre-defined within the i.s.h.med package of solutions, based on customer experiences.

This simplifies implementation and helps structure the medication process efficiently: doctors can enter prescriptions in the HIS and the system will automatically generate work lists for the care staff; documentation for administering the drugs is also generated via the HIS. The package also provides a connection to the drug catalog and the "Clinical Checking" tool from Dosing GmbH. This allows prescriptions to be checked for interactions or to ensure the correct doses, and to correct them as appropriate. This can help improve the safety of drug treatment in particular of older, multimorbid patients who are taking several forms of medication.

Compared to patients in the regular ward, charts in intensive care are much more complex, in view of the special requirements that apply there. In addition to the standard vital parameters, they include information on cardiac and respiratory function. The new "Critical Care" module in the Soarian HIS, available in numerous countries as of now, takes care of these requirements. Data from intensive care monitoring devices feeds automatically into the digital chart, which gives the care personnel a rapid overview of the patient's condition.

Unlike dedicated departmental systems for intensive care, Soarian "Critical Care" is fully incorporated into the HIS. This means that information from intensive care can be viewed in the recovery or regular wards, depending on authorization levels. For instance, staff there can read – from their usual HIS user interface – what medications the patient has received and how the patient's vital parameters have changed, and thus draw conclusions for further treatment. The "Critical Care" module is also designed for comprehensive connection to medical devices in the hospital, and can also be used outside of the intensive care unit.

The intensive care module will be used in locations such as the Erasmus University Medical Center Rotterdam and the University Medical Center Groningen. A project assigned recently by both hospitals includes not only the implementation of an HIS, but also archiving and networking solutions, forming the basis for a future-proof IT strategy for both hospitals. It is thus an example of the Unified Information Management concept being presented by Siemens at conhIT. It takes account of the changing demands of hospitals throughout Europe: considering the rapid growth in data volumes and a growing need for interdisciplinary cooperation, they are less interested in one-off solutions for special problems. Rather, they want an overall concept, one that will manage information in a range of formats and from a range of sources – images, laboratory results or physicians' reports – and make it available across all institutions and sectors.

With Unified Information Management, Siemens combines archiving and networking solutions to healthcare IT strategies suitable for customer requirements. It uses Soarian Health Archive and the vendor-neutral multimedia archive syngo.share to archive and manage documents and images. Soarian Integrated Care and the IHE (Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise)-based 'sense' are available to ensure a targeted and secure exchange of data. The components of Unified Information Management that are used depend on specific customer requirements. The solution is so scalable and flexible that it can even lead to fully digital care processes.

Additional information on conhIT is available at www.siemens.com/press/conhit2014

The Siemens Healthcare Sector is one of the world's largest suppliers to the healthcare industry and a trendsetter in medical imaging, laboratory diagnostics, medical information technology and hearing aids. Siemens offers its customers products and solutions for the entire range of patient care from a single source – from prevention and early detection to diagnosis, and on to treatment and aftercare. By optimizing clinical workflows for the most common diseases, Siemens also makes healthcare faster, better and more cost-effective. Siemens Healthcare employs some 52,000 employees worldwide and operates around the world. In fiscal year 2013 (to September 30), the Sector posted revenue of 13.6 billion euros and profit of 2.0 billion euros. For further information please visit: http://www.siemens.com/healthcare

The products/features (here mentioned) are not commercially available in all countries. Due to regulatory reasons their future availability cannot be guaranteed. Please contact your local Siemens organization for further details.

Reference Number: HCX201405021e 

Contact

Ms. Stefanie Schiller
Healthcare Sector

Siemens AG

Henkestr. 127

91052  Erlangen

Germany

Tel: +49 (9131) 84-7803

Stefanie Schiller | Siemens Healthcare

Further reports about: Healthcare Networking critical care parameters processes

More articles from Medical Engineering:

nachricht A laser for your eyes
18.04.2016 | Lomonosov Moscow State University

nachricht New technology for examining cardiovascular blood vessels
14.04.2016 | Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V.

All articles from Medical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Nuclear Pores Captured on Film

Using an ultra fast-scanning atomic force microscope, a team of researchers from the University of Basel has filmed “living” nuclear pore complexes at work for the first time. Nuclear pores are molecular machines that control the traffic entering or exiting the cell nucleus. In their article published in Nature Nanotechnology, the researchers explain how the passage of unwanted molecules is prevented by rapidly moving molecular “tentacles” inside the pore.

Using high-speed AFM, Roderick Lim, Argovia Professor at the Biozentrum and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute of the University of Basel, has not only directly...

Im Focus: 2+1 is Not Always 3 - In the microworld unity is not always strength

If a person pushes a broken-down car alone, there is a certain effect. If another person helps, the result is the sum of their efforts. If two micro-particles are pushing another microparticle, however, the resulting effect may not necessarily be the sum their efforts. A recent study published in Nature Communications, measured this odd effect that scientists call “many body.”

In the microscopic world, where the modern miniaturized machines at the new frontiers of technology operate, as long as we are in the presence of two...

Im Focus: Tiny microbots that can clean up water

Researchers from the Max Planck Institute Stuttgart have developed self-propelled tiny ‘microbots’ that can remove lead or organic pollution from contaminated water.

Working with colleagues in Barcelona and Singapore, Samuel Sánchez’s group used graphene oxide to make their microscale motors, which are able to adsorb lead...

Im Focus: ORNL researchers discover new state of water molecule

Neutron scattering and computational modeling have revealed unique and unexpected behavior of water molecules under extreme confinement that is unmatched by any known gas, liquid or solid states.

In a paper published in Physical Review Letters, researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory describe a new tunneling state of...

Im Focus: Bionic Lightweight Design researchers of the Alfred Wegener Institute at Hannover Messe 2016

Honeycomb structures as the basic building block for industrial applications presented using holo pyramid

Researchers of the Alfred Wegener Institute (AWI) will introduce their latest developments in the field of bionic lightweight design at Hannover Messe from 25...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

The “AC21 International Forum 2016” is About to Begin

27.04.2016 | Event News

Soft switching combines efficiency and improved electro-magnetic compatibility

15.04.2016 | Event News

Grid-Supportive Buildings Give Boost to Renewable Energy Integration

12.04.2016 | Event News

 
Latest News

New fabrication and thermo-optical tuning of whispering gallery microlasers

04.05.2016 | Physics and Astronomy

Introducing the disposable laser

04.05.2016 | Physics and Astronomy

A new vortex identification method for 3-D complex flow

04.05.2016 | Materials Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>