Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Minimally invasive surgery removes sinus tumor without facial disfiguration

15.12.2009
Only about one in 2,000 people in the United States get a sinus tumor, but Johnnie Wilcox was one of the unfortunate few.

Ms. Wilcox's tumor was a classic case. She had few symptoms early on, and even those problems were mistaken for blocked sinuses.

"For several months, I could not breathe through the right side of my nose," recalled the resident of Goldthwaite, a town of less than 2,000 in the heart of Texas' Hill Country. "I felt a fullness, but I didn't take that as something terrible. I never believed it would be a malignant tumor."

She began to suspect a problem when her symptoms persisted, then worsened. When she developed swelling above her right eye and a red streak on her face, family members took her to the nearest emergency room, where an ear, nose and throat specialist identified the tumor.

Her doctor told her it needed to be removed and recommended Dr. Pete Batra, associate professor of otolaryngology – head and neck surgery and co-director of the Comprehensive Skull Base Program at UT Southwestern Medical Center. Dr. Batra specializes in minimally invasive approaches to the skull base and innovative management strategies for chronic rhinosinusitis, or inflammation of the sinuses.

Removing tumors such as Ms. Wilcox's from the base of the skull can be a challenge, Dr. Batra said, because they often grow precariously close to critical cranial nerves, blood vessels and eye sockets. Extensive experience and special skills are needed to remove them without damaging nearby structures like the eye and brain.

"Traditionally, tumors of the sinuses have been removed by open craniofacial resection. This involves making incisions on the face and a craniotomy, which is removal of the forehead bone flap by a neurosurgeon," Dr. Batra said.

With the advances in sinus endoscopy, however, many tumors can now be removed directly through the nose, avoiding the need for facial incisions or a craniotomy. Complications are decreased and recovery is faster.

While not all patients are candidates for the minimally invasive techniques, Ms. Wilcox was, Dr. Batra said.

"I was told I might have to give up my right eye to the disease, but of course, none of that happened. Dr. Batra removed it piece by piece through my right nostril with no major facial scarring," she said. "To me Dr. Batra is a miracle doctor. I would not be living now if this tumor was still bleeding."

Instead, she'll celebrate her 85th birthday on Christmas Day.

In addition to sinus tumors, the Comprehensive Skull Base Program at UT Southwestern addresses more than two dozen types of skull-base related conditions, including cerebrospinal fluid leak, glomus tumors, meningioma, neurofibromatosis, pituitary neoplasms, sarcoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and van Hippel Landau disease.

A multidisciplinary team of physicians from a range of specialties – otolaryngology – head and neck surgery, neurological surgery, neuro-ophthalmology, neuro-oncology, radiation oncology, interventional radiology and pathology – carefully coordinate the care and treatment of patients using the latest techniques and technology.

Visit http://www.utsouthwestern.org/skullbase to learn more about clinical services in the Comprehensive Skull Base Program at UT Southwestern.

This news release is available on our World Wide Web home page at http://www.utsouthwestern.edu/home/news/index.html

To automatically receive news releases from UT Southwestern via e-mail, subscribe at www.utsouthwestern.edu/receivenews

http://www.utsouthwestern.edu/findfac/professional/0,2356,107688,00.html

Russell Rian | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.utsouthwestern.edu

More articles from Medical Engineering:

nachricht New technique makes brain scans better
22.06.2017 | Massachusetts Institute of Technology

nachricht New technology enables effective simultaneous testing for multiple blood-borne pathogens
13.06.2017 | Elsevier

All articles from Medical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Climate satellite: Tracking methane with robust laser technology

Heatwaves in the Arctic, longer periods of vegetation in Europe, severe floods in West Africa – starting in 2021, scientists want to explore the emissions of the greenhouse gas methane with the German-French satellite MERLIN. This is made possible by a new robust laser system of the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT in Aachen, which achieves unprecedented measurement accuracy.

Methane is primarily the result of the decomposition of organic matter. The gas has a 25 times greater warming potential than carbon dioxide, but is not as...

Im Focus: How protons move through a fuel cell

Hydrogen is regarded as the energy source of the future: It is produced with solar power and can be used to generate heat and electricity in fuel cells. Empa researchers have now succeeded in decoding the movement of hydrogen ions in crystals – a key step towards more efficient energy conversion in the hydrogen industry of tomorrow.

As charge carriers, electrons and ions play the leading role in electrochemical energy storage devices and converters such as batteries and fuel cells. Proton...

Im Focus: A unique data centre for cosmological simulations

Scientists from the Excellence Cluster Universe at the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität Munich have establised "Cosmowebportal", a unique data centre for cosmological simulations located at the Leibniz Supercomputing Centre (LRZ) of the Bavarian Academy of Sciences. The complete results of a series of large hydrodynamical cosmological simulations are available, with data volumes typically exceeding several hundred terabytes. Scientists worldwide can interactively explore these complex simulations via a web interface and directly access the results.

With current telescopes, scientists can observe our Universe’s galaxies and galaxy clusters and their distribution along an invisible cosmic web. From the...

Im Focus: Scientists develop molecular thermometer for contactless measurement using infrared light

Temperature measurements possible even on the smallest scale / Molecular ruby for use in material sciences, biology, and medicine

Chemists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) in cooperation with researchers of the German Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (BAM)...

Im Focus: Optoelectronic Inline Measurement – Accurate to the Nanometer

Germany counts high-precision manufacturing processes among its advantages as a location. It’s not just the aerospace and automotive industries that require almost waste-free, high-precision manufacturing to provide an efficient way of testing the shape and orientation tolerances of products. Since current inline measurement technology not yet provides the required accuracy, the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT is collaborating with four renowned industry partners in the INSPIRE project to develop inline sensors with a new accuracy class. Funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF), the project is scheduled to run until the end of 2019.

New Manufacturing Technologies for New Products

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Plants are networkers

19.06.2017 | Event News

Digital Survival Training for Executives

13.06.2017 | Event News

Global Learning Council Summit 2017

13.06.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

New technique makes brain scans better

22.06.2017 | Medical Engineering

CWRU researchers find a chemical solution to shrink digital data storage

22.06.2017 | Life Sciences

Warming temperatures threaten sea turtles

22.06.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>