Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Instron Testing Solutions for Medical Engineering and Biotechnology: Easy-to-Clean BioCoat Protects Instron® Testing Systems

27.06.2012
BioCoat is a new polyurethane protective cover designed for Instron® Series 5940 single column testing systems.
Their applications include mechanical low-force in-vitro testing of biomaterials and components as well as materials for medical and biotechnology devices in temperature-controlled baths containing fluids such as water, saline solutions, blood or blood simulation products.

The cover prevents leaking or spilled fluids from these baths from penetrating into the test system and damaging its sensitive electronic components. The BioCoat’s extremely smooth surface enables contaminations to be removed easily and is resistant to the usual detergents.

The cover is available as a separate component and can be retrofitted on the test frame in just a few steps. All connections and controls remain easily accessible, and the system's functionality is fully retained. BioCoat is compatible with all fixtures, grips, baths, extensometers and platens from the Instron standard range of accessories.

Biomedical testing is a typical application for Series 5940 single-column testing systems. Instron® 5942, 5943 and 5944 combine high accuracy and optimum flexibility to meet a wide variety of requirements when testing medical devices and biomaterials such as tissues, elastomers, wires, or films. Their small footprint saves valuable space in the test laboratory. A high-stiffness test frame ensures optimum repeatability of test conditions and reliable test results. Test speeds range from 0.05 to 2500 mm/min; nominal force capacities are 0.5 kN for the 5942 system, 1 kN for the 5943, and 2 kN for the 5944 system.

All three are designed to work with both Instron's BioPuls submersible grips and Instron’s BioPuls bath, specifically dedicated to biomedical testing. The particularly light-weight pneumatic grips are easy to fasten and to align, and prevent slippage of the specimens under load. Typical applications include tests conducted at very low forces, such as testing of hydrogels, contact lenses or filaments, as well as testing of natural or artificial tissues, tubing or foils at loads up to 250 N. The BioPuls temperature-controlled bath enables precise simulation of the conditions present in a living organism. The pneumatic lifting device facilitates handling, increases productivity and minimizes the risk of contamination of the laboratory environment. The bath can be used together with high-precision, non-contacting Instron® AVE video extensometers, which – unlike conventional clip-on extensometers – have no adverse effects on delicate specimens.

For further information about the use of Instron® testing systems in biomedical testing go to go.instron.com/biomedtesting

Instron (www.instron.de) is a globally leading manufacturer of test equipment for the material and structural testing markets. A global company providing single-source convenience, Instron manufactures and services products used to test the mechanical properties and performance of various materials, components and structures in a wide array of environments. Instron systems evaluate materials ranging from the most fragile filament to advanced high-strength alloys. With the combined experience of CEAST in designing plastic testing systems, Instron enhances materials testing offerings, providing customers with comprehensive solutions for all their research, quality and service-life testing requirements. Additionally, Instron offers a broad range of service capabilities, including assistance with laboratory management, calibration expertise and customer training. Instron is part of the US based Illinois Tool Works (ITW) group of companies with more than 850 distributed business units in 52 countries worldwide and a staff of approx. 60,000.

Editorial contact and address for voucher copies:
Dr.-Ing. Jörg Wolters, Konsens PR GmbH & Co. KG,
Hans-Kudlich-Straße 25, D-64823 Groß-Umstadt – www.konsens.de
Tel.: +49 (0) 60 78 / 93 63 - 0, Fax: - 20, E-Mail: mail@konsens.de

Dr.-Ing. Jörg Wolters | Konsens PR

More articles from Medical Engineering:

nachricht New imaging technique able to watch molecular dynamics of neurodegenerative diseases
14.07.2017 | The Optical Society

nachricht Quick test finds signs of sepsis in a single drop of blood
03.07.2017 | University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

All articles from Medical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Carbon Nanotubes Turn Electrical Current into Light-emitting Quasi-particles

Strong light-matter coupling in these semiconducting tubes may hold the key to electrically pumped lasers

Light-matter quasi-particles can be generated electrically in semiconducting carbon nanotubes. Material scientists and physicists from Heidelberg University...

Im Focus: Flexible proximity sensor creates smart surfaces

Fraunhofer IPA has developed a proximity sensor made from silicone and carbon nanotubes (CNT) which detects objects and determines their position. The materials and printing process used mean that the sensor is extremely flexible, economical and can be used for large surfaces. Industry and research partners can use and further develop this innovation straight away.

At first glance, the proximity sensor appears to be nothing special: a thin, elastic layer of silicone onto which black square surfaces are printed, but these...

Im Focus: 3-D scanning with water

3-D shape acquisition using water displacement as the shape sensor for the reconstruction of complex objects

A global team of computer scientists and engineers have developed an innovative technique that more completely reconstructs challenging 3D objects. An ancient...

Im Focus: Manipulating Electron Spins Without Loss of Information

Physicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute. The results have been published in Physical Review X.

For several years, researchers have been trying to use the spin of an electron to store and transmit information. The spin of each electron is always coupled...

Im Focus: The proton precisely weighted

What is the mass of a proton? Scientists from Germany and Japan successfully did an important step towards the most exact knowledge of this fundamental constant. By means of precision measurements on a single proton, they could improve the precision by a factor of three and also correct the existing value.

To determine the mass of a single proton still more accurate – a group of physicists led by Klaus Blaum and Sven Sturm of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Closing the Sustainability Circle: Protection of Food with Biobased Materials

21.07.2017 | Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

The technology with a feel for feelings

12.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

NASA mission surfs through waves in space to understand space weather

25.07.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Strength of tectonic plates may explain shape of the Tibetan Plateau, study finds

25.07.2017 | Earth Sciences

The dense vessel network regulates formation of thrombocytes in the bone marrow

25.07.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>