Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Fusion of Images: CT and Ultrasound Combined

23.01.2012
The new ACUSON S3000* ultrasound system from Siemens will be able to display pictures from different imaging technologies at the same time. It includes advanced automated ultrasound fusion imaging.
This feature provides radiologists additional clinical and spatial information in the analysis of complex pathology and/or when performing interventional procedures such as biopsies. The system is not commercially available yet.

The ACUSON S3000 system is equipped with the new imaging technology eSie Fusion™ auto registration**, which enables the automatic fusion of 3-D computed tomography (CT) volumes with real-time ultrasound via a single click.

Current fusion techniques require time-consuming manual registration of CT or magnetic resonance (MR) images. To eliminate these limitations, Siemens Healthcare experts developed automatic, one-click advanced registration capabilities, reducing CT image registration to mere seconds, and profoundly simplifying manual registration techniques to enhance workflow during MR volume registration. The development was supported by researchers of Siemens Corporate Technology in Princeton, New Jersey.

Radiologists recognize eSie Fusion registration as helpful in daily routine work. The fusion of clinical images significantly speeds up the workflow. Previously, the success of interventions was generally monitored by follow-up CT examinations. Now it should be possible to reduce the number of follow-ups done with CT. The use of fusion provides improved clinical information – without additional radiation.

This is an advantage for both the patients and the healthcare provider. In addition to fusion imaging, the system features multi-modality review capabilities** allowing CT and/or MR images to be imported into the ultrasound system for a rapid, easy side-by-side comparison. These capabilities provide an additional layer of information to further increase diagnostic confidence and confirm therapeutic decisions.

Disclaimer: On account of certain regional limitations of sales rights and service availability, Siemens cannot guarantee that the products included in this document are available through the Siemens sales organization worldwide. Availability and packaging may vary by country and are subject to change without prior notice. Some/All of the features and products described herein may not be available in the United States. The information in this document contains general technical descriptions of specifications and options as well as standard and optional features which do not always have to be present in individual cases. Siemens reserves the right to modify the design, packaging, specifications, and options described herein without prior notice. Please contact your local Siemens sales representative for the most current information.

*510 pending; not commercially available
**Works in Progress

Dr. Norbert Aschenbrenner | Siemens InnovationNews
Further information:
http://www.siemens.com/innovationnews

More articles from Medical Engineering:

nachricht New imaging technique able to watch molecular dynamics of neurodegenerative diseases
14.07.2017 | The Optical Society

nachricht Quick test finds signs of sepsis in a single drop of blood
03.07.2017 | University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

All articles from Medical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Manipulating Electron Spins Without Loss of Information

Physicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute. The results have been published in Physical Review X.

For several years, researchers have been trying to use the spin of an electron to store and transmit information. The spin of each electron is always coupled...

Im Focus: The proton precisely weighted

What is the mass of a proton? Scientists from Germany and Japan successfully did an important step towards the most exact knowledge of this fundamental constant. By means of precision measurements on a single proton, they could improve the precision by a factor of three and also correct the existing value.

To determine the mass of a single proton still more accurate – a group of physicists led by Klaus Blaum and Sven Sturm of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear...

Im Focus: On the way to a biological alternative

A bacterial enzyme enables reactions that open up alternatives to key industrial chemical processes

The research team of Prof. Dr. Oliver Einsle at the University of Freiburg's Institute of Biochemistry has long been exploring the functioning of nitrogenase....

Im Focus: The 1 trillion tonne iceberg

Larsen C Ice Shelf rift finally breaks through

A one trillion tonne iceberg - one of the biggest ever recorded -- has calved away from the Larsen C Ice Shelf in Antarctica, after a rift in the ice,...

Im Focus: Laser-cooled ions contribute to better understanding of friction

Physics supports biology: Researchers from PTB have developed a model system to investigate friction phenomena with atomic precision

Friction: what you want from car brakes, otherwise rather a nuisance. In any case, it is useful to know as precisely as possible how friction phenomena arise –...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Closing the Sustainability Circle: Protection of Food with Biobased Materials

21.07.2017 | Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

The technology with a feel for feelings

12.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

NASA looks to solar eclipse to help understand Earth's energy system

21.07.2017 | Earth Sciences

Stanford researchers develop a new type of soft, growing robot

21.07.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Vortex photons from electrons in circular motion

21.07.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>