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Fast and effective testing for drugs of abuse: the Dräger DrugTest 5000

Using the Dräger DrugTest 5000, up to six different drug classes can be detected within minutes. Since this compact, system for detecting drugs of abuse analyzes saliva, it is also extremely simple and hygienic to use. Furthermore, modern data management capabilities ensure sample documentation is easy to create.

The Dräger DrugTest 5000 is capable of detecting even minute traces of addictive drugs in saliva within minutes. This means it can provide a quick check on whether a patient has consumed drugs of abuse and to which class they belong, making it particularly useful prior to admission to the emergency ward.

As a preliminary test, the Dräger DrugTest 5000 analyzes the samples for traces of opiates, cocaine, cannabinoids and amphetamines, as well as designer drugs and sedatives from the group of benzodiazepines. The results for five of the drug classes are available after just five minutes, while the test for cannabinoids is completed after ten. This not only makes it possible to exclude drug abuse quickly, it also helps to reduce the number of cost- and time-intensive laboratory blood tests.

Easy and convenient to use

The system comprises two main components: the Dräger DrugTest 5000 Analyzer and the Dräger DrugTest 5000 Test Kit. After the protective cap has been removed from the saliva test collector, a sample is taken from the patient’s mouth. As soon as sufficient saliva has been gathered in the test kit for analysis, the built-in indicator turns blue. The operator then places the test cassette into the analyzer, which displays whether the result is "positive" or "negative" for every drug class on its color display. Acoustic signals support and inform the operator during the entire procedure.

Due to its simple operation, the Dräger DrugTest 5000 is far more discreet and hygienic for both patients and operators than urine-based sample collection. It also minimizes health risks associated with handling body fluids. In addition, controlling the entire sample collection procedure is much easier, virtually eliminating the possibility of manipulation.

Uncomplicated data management

The analyzer saves the number, course and results of up to 500 tests. It also documents operator and instrument errors. If immediate documentation of protocols is required, the Dräger DrugTest 5000 can be linked to a portable printer using an infrared interface.

Dräger. Technology for Life®

Dräger is an international leader in the fields of medical and safety technology. Dräger products protect, support and save lives. Founded in 1889, in 2007 Dräger generated revenues of around EUR 1.8 billion. The Dräger Group employs around 10,000 people in more than 40 countries worldwide.

Trade media contact
Christine Reimann
Tel.: +49 451 882 1547

Christine Reimann | Drägerwerk AG & Co. KGaA
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