Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

EUROECHO 2008 -- Echocardiography now recommended as the ‘first-line’ test in cardiovascular disease

10.12.2008
The first-line test in patients with a suspicion of cardiovascular disease – including arterial disease and heart failure - should now be echocardiography, says Professor Jose Luis Zamorano, Chair of the Programme Committee for EUROECHO 2008 and EAE President-Elect.

EUROECHO 2008, which is now the world’s largest scientific gathering on echocardiography, will take place in Lyon, France, from 10-13th December.

EUROECHO 2008 is the twelfth Annual Meeting of the European Association of Echocardiography, a registered branch of the European Society of Cardiology

Professor Zamorano, from the San Carlos University Clinic in Madrid, Spain, describes echocardiography as “crucial” in all types of heart disease, not just to confirm diagnosis but also to exclude the possibility of disease; “so echocardiography is excellent in diagnosis and prognosis”, he adds.

The principal advantage of routine echocardiography, which uses ultrasound waves to produce an image of the heart, is its non-invasive nature. A transducer placed on the thorax can produce accurate images of the heart’s four chambers, the valves and aorta, and tissue damage, and thereby provide information on blood flow, pumping capacity and coronary arteries.

An alternative – and usually more accurate - image can be provided by transesophageal echocardiography, by which the transducer is passed directly into the patient’s esophagus, thereby avoiding the thoracic barriers of skin, fat and bone.

Two other technological developments will be reviewed at EUROECHO 2008: the development of portable echocardiographic systems; and the rapid introduction of three-dimensional echo. The congress will also feature two formal scientific themes: stress echo as one of the major diagnostic tests for coronary artery disease; and the application of echocardiography in patients with heart failure, presently the world’s fastest growing cardiovascular disease.

1. Portable systems
Portable – even miniature and pocket – echo systems are easy to use, have the same definition and accuracy as traditional modalities, but now bring their diagnostic capability outside the hospital. The latest guidelines in emergency coronary care stress the importance of speedy intervention and diagnosis as much as the application of appropriate treatments. Portable systems, which are easily used by a wide range of physicians, are increasingly incorporated into acute coronary care programmes.
2. 3-dimension echo
By the development of matrix probes and complex processing systems, 3D echocardiography is now possible and in rapid evolution, providing graphic anatomical images of the heart. “3D is a big step forward,” says Professor Zamorano, “and will be the number one technique in the very near future.” Currently, 3D echo technology has been used to notable effect in valvular heart disease (mitral and aortic valve) and in assessing left ventricular function.

Introduced at EUROECHO 2008 and newly available on the website of the European Association of Echocardiography is the “3D Echo Box”, a real-time three-dimensional echo compendium of clinical cases, webcasts, and resource bank of videos and photos designed to provide a one-stop reference point for echocardiographers. (See http://www.escardio.org/communities/EAE/Pages/welcome.aspx)

3. Stress echo
Stress echo is now one of the prime-time tests for patients suspected of coronary artery disease. Stress echo (along with 3D echo and cardiac resynchronisation therapy) will feature in a newly launched “Imaging Campus” at EUROECHO 2008, a series of individualised hands-on training sessions in which congress participants will be guided through the practical techniques of echo imaging and patient contact.
4. Heart failure
“All patients with presumed heart failure should have at least one echo test,” says Professor Zamorano. Yet this, in the most prevalent cardiovascular disease, is not yet the reality in Europe. The SHAPE survey reported earlier this year that primary care physicians and geriatricians displayed less-than-optimal use of echocardiography for a diagnosis of heart failure, relying instead on “signs and symptoms”. However, echo was unavailable to more than 50 per cent of the primary care physicians. This, adds Professor Zamorano, is a concern; a wrong diagnosis may well mean the wrong treatment.

Professor Petros Nihoyannopoulos from the National Heart and Lung Institute in London and outgoing President of the European Association of Echocardiography describes echocardiography as “the most important diagnostic imaging modality in cardiology”, adding: “I am convinced that echocardiography will be the major sub-specialty in cardiology for the next 20 years and beyond.”

ESC Press Office | alfa
Further information:
http://www.escardio.org
http://www.escardio.org/about/press/press-releases/pr-08/Pages/EUROECHO-2008-press-release.aspx

More articles from Medical Engineering:

nachricht 3-D visualization of the pancreas -- new tool in diabetes research
15.03.2017 | Umea University

nachricht New PET radiotracer identifies inflammation in life-threatening atherosclerosis
02.03.2017 | Society of Nuclear Medicine

All articles from Medical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

Im Focus: Researchers Imitate Molecular Crowding in Cells

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to simulate these confined natural conditions in artificial vesicles for the first time. As reported in the academic journal Small, the results are offering better insight into the development of nanoreactors and artificial organelles.

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Argon is not the 'dope' for metallic hydrogen

24.03.2017 | Materials Sciences

Astronomers find unexpected, dust-obscured star formation in distant galaxy

24.03.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Gravitational wave kicks monster black hole out of galactic core

24.03.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>