Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

EU’s threat to MRI scanners still looms large

17.12.2008
Urgent action and public pressure is still required to stop the European Union adopting legislation which will restrict the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners in the UK and throughout Europe.

Earlier this year, thanks to a successful campaigning effort by the UK’s MRI community, including the British Institute of Radiology and the Royal College of Radiologists, a last minute postponement to the Physical Agents (EMF) Directive was introduced which delayed its implementation that would have had a serious impact on current and emerging MRI techniques.

The Institute of Physics (IOP) has launched a new report, MRI and the Physical Agents (EMF) Directive, which intends to spur informed debate and encourage European politicians to consider more recent research which shows how potentially harmful the heavy-handed European directive is.

Although the implementation of the directive has been postponed until April 2012, its content remains unchanged and, unless there is a further amendment, the exposure limit for low-frequency magnetic fields will still severely impair use of MRI scanners in medical practice and research.

This new report suggests that the logic behind the limit on low-frequency magnetic fields is based on out-of-date and unreplicated research and, if implemented, will result in increased use of X-rays as a diagnostic tool.

Dr Stephen Keevil, author of the IOP’s report from Kings’ College, London, writes, “It is difficult to avoid the conclusion that a range of current and emerging MRI procedures would be rendered illegal by the directive. Some of these techniques simply cannot be performed in other ways, and in other cases the only possible option would expose both the patient and workers to ionising radiation.”

The report summarises a series of possible outcomes proposed by the European Commission and suggests that a solution specific to MRI would be more suitable than a one-size-fits-all mandatory directive as it would be easier to modify when new research about exposure levels is undertaken and, unlike the directive in its current form, could specifically address any health concerns surrounding MRI.

There are 500 MRI scanners situated in hospitals around the UK, benefitting more than one million patients every year. Three of the most common uses for MRI scanners in the UK are diagnosing and monitoring the success of cancer treatment and assessing the damage caused by a stroke or heart attack. MRI also plays a vital role in clinical research of diseases such as multiple sclerosis.

Joe Winters | alfa
Further information:
http://www.iop.org

More articles from Medical Engineering:

nachricht New imaging technique able to watch molecular dynamics of neurodegenerative diseases
14.07.2017 | The Optical Society

nachricht Quick test finds signs of sepsis in a single drop of blood
03.07.2017 | University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

All articles from Medical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Manipulating Electron Spins Without Loss of Information

Physicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute. The results have been published in Physical Review X.

For several years, researchers have been trying to use the spin of an electron to store and transmit information. The spin of each electron is always coupled...

Im Focus: The proton precisely weighted

What is the mass of a proton? Scientists from Germany and Japan successfully did an important step towards the most exact knowledge of this fundamental constant. By means of precision measurements on a single proton, they could improve the precision by a factor of three and also correct the existing value.

To determine the mass of a single proton still more accurate – a group of physicists led by Klaus Blaum and Sven Sturm of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear...

Im Focus: On the way to a biological alternative

A bacterial enzyme enables reactions that open up alternatives to key industrial chemical processes

The research team of Prof. Dr. Oliver Einsle at the University of Freiburg's Institute of Biochemistry has long been exploring the functioning of nitrogenase....

Im Focus: The 1 trillion tonne iceberg

Larsen C Ice Shelf rift finally breaks through

A one trillion tonne iceberg - one of the biggest ever recorded -- has calved away from the Larsen C Ice Shelf in Antarctica, after a rift in the ice,...

Im Focus: Laser-cooled ions contribute to better understanding of friction

Physics supports biology: Researchers from PTB have developed a model system to investigate friction phenomena with atomic precision

Friction: what you want from car brakes, otherwise rather a nuisance. In any case, it is useful to know as precisely as possible how friction phenomena arise –...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Closing the Sustainability Circle: Protection of Food with Biobased Materials

21.07.2017 | Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

The technology with a feel for feelings

12.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

NASA looks to solar eclipse to help understand Earth's energy system

21.07.2017 | Earth Sciences

Stanford researchers develop a new type of soft, growing robot

21.07.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Vortex photons from electrons in circular motion

21.07.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>