Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Enhancing imaging capabilities with breast tomosynthesis

15.10.2009
Siemens releases first mammography systems equipped with 3D tomosynthesis

Siemens Healthcare has now integrated 3D tomosynthesis into its Mammomat Inspiration digital mammography platform. This technology compiles three-dimensional images of the breast and can therefore detect tumors even if hidden by overlapping tissue.


This enables a more accurate diagnosis than before and reduces the number of false positive findings. The first Mammomat systems with tomosynthesis have now been installed in Germany and in Belgium.

Dr. Renate Tewaag from Radprax - a group of practices specializing in radiology, nuclear medicine and radiation therapy - was the first radiologist in Germany to use this new Siemens technology.

"With tomosynthesis we are witnessing a fascinating further development in digital mammography. This 3D technology offers impressive improvements in the detection of detail, which benefit both patients and radiologists alike: We can be more certain in our diagnosis, while women being examined can feel more reassured", explained Dr. Tewaag. "Tomosynthesis makes mammography less stressful for both the physician and patient. Based on current first impressions, additional examinations and interventions can be avoided with a clear conscience. Lesions hidden within the dense glandular tissue are identified at an earlier stage."

So far, conventional analog mammography and digital full-field mammography was only able to display the three-dimensional anatomical structure of the breast on a two-dimensional level. This made diagnosis more difficult and limited the possibility of the physician identifying certain types of tumor; since, anatomical structures could overlap and obscure lesions. The 3D tomosynthesis technology in the Mammomat Inspiration overcomes these limitations: The technology acquires several projections of the breast from different angles using a fast detector based on amorphous Selenium (aSe) and uses this raw data to generate a 3D volume set. This enables a better analysis of the type and size of lesions as well as microcalcifications compared to conventional methods.

Tomosynthesis increases the sensitivity and specificity of mammography, as well as improving tumor differentiation and classification.

Tomosynthesis differs from conventional mammography in the same way that, for example, a CT scan (computer tomography) differs from a classical X-ray image. During the examination, the Xray tube moves in a 50-degree arc around the breast, taking 25 low-dose images. The images are then used as raw data to construct high-resolution 3D images. High spatial resolution and a wide acquisition angle result in the production of mammography images with unparalleled image quality.

The digital Mammomat Inspiration system with basic screening and diagnostic functions has been on the market since the end of 2007 and is widely used in hospitals and medical practices around the world. Mammomat Inspiration offers screening, diagnostics, stereotactic biopsy, and now tomosynthesis for the first time together on a single integrated digital platform. Any hospital or practice can purchase a screening device and add the biopsy and 3D tomosynthesis applications at a later time if necessary. Soon, all installed systems of this type can be upgraded on-site with the tomosynthesis function.

The Siemens Healthcare Sector is one of the world's largest suppliers to the healthcare industry and a trendsetter in medical imaging, laboratory diagnostics, medical information technology and hearing aids. Siemens is the only company to offer customers products and solutions for the entire range of patient care from a single source – from prevention and early detection to diagnosis, and on to treatment and aftercare. By optimizing clinical workflows for the most common diseases, Siemens also makes healthcare faster, better and more cost-effective. Siemens Healthcare employs some 49,000 employees worldwide and operates in over 130 countries. In fiscal year 2008 (to September 30), the Sector posted revenue of 11.2 billion euros and profit of 1.2 billion euros.

Bianca Braun | Siemens Healthcare
Further information:
http://www.siemens.com/healthcare

More articles from Medical Engineering:

nachricht Medical gamma-ray camera is now palm-sized
23.05.2017 | Waseda University

nachricht Computer accurately identifies and delineates breast cancers on digital tissue slides
11.05.2017 | Case Western Reserve University

All articles from Medical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Can the immune system be boosted against Staphylococcus aureus by delivery of messenger RNA?

Staphylococcus aureus is a feared pathogen (MRSA, multi-resistant S. aureus) due to frequent resistances against many antibiotics, especially in hospital infections. Researchers at the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut have identified immunological processes that prevent a successful immune response directed against the pathogenic agent. The delivery of bacterial proteins with RNA adjuvant or messenger RNA (mRNA) into immune cells allows the re-direction of the immune response towards an active defense against S. aureus. This could be of significant importance for the development of an effective vaccine. PLOS Pathogens has published these research results online on 25 May 2017.

Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a bacterium that colonizes by far more than half of the skin and the mucosa of adults, usually without causing infections....

Im Focus: A quantum walk of photons

Physicists from the University of Würzburg are capable of generating identical looking single light particles at the push of a button. Two new studies now demonstrate the potential this method holds.

The quantum computer has fuelled the imagination of scientists for decades: It is based on fundamentally different phenomena than a conventional computer....

Im Focus: Turmoil in sluggish electrons’ existence

An international team of physicists has monitored the scattering behaviour of electrons in a non-conducting material in real-time. Their insights could be beneficial for radiotherapy.

We can refer to electrons in non-conducting materials as ‘sluggish’. Typically, they remain fixed in a location, deep inside an atomic composite. It is hence...

Im Focus: Wafer-thin Magnetic Materials Developed for Future Quantum Technologies

Two-dimensional magnetic structures are regarded as a promising material for new types of data storage, since the magnetic properties of individual molecular building blocks can be investigated and modified. For the first time, researchers have now produced a wafer-thin ferrimagnet, in which molecules with different magnetic centers arrange themselves on a gold surface to form a checkerboard pattern. Scientists at the Swiss Nanoscience Institute at the University of Basel and the Paul Scherrer Institute published their findings in the journal Nature Communications.

Ferrimagnets are composed of two centers which are magnetized at different strengths and point in opposing directions. Two-dimensional, quasi-flat ferrimagnets...

Im Focus: World's thinnest hologram paves path to new 3-D world

Nano-hologram paves way for integration of 3-D holography into everyday electronics

An Australian-Chinese research team has created the world's thinnest hologram, paving the way towards the integration of 3D holography into everyday...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Marine Conservation: IASS Contributes to UN Ocean Conference in New York on 5-9 June

24.05.2017 | Event News

AWK Aachen Machine Tool Colloquium 2017: Internet of Production for Agile Enterprises

23.05.2017 | Event News

Dortmund MST Conference presents Individualized Healthcare Solutions with micro and nanotechnology

22.05.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

How herpesviruses win the footrace against the immune system

26.05.2017 | Life Sciences

Water forms 'spine of hydration' around DNA, group finds

26.05.2017 | Life Sciences

First Juno science results supported by University of Leicester's Jupiter 'forecast'

26.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>