Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

New aortic valve without open heart surgery

06.12.2010
Siemens Healthcare developed a new, smart visualization and guidance technology, which facilitates implantation of an aortic replacement valve by means of a catheter.

The technology spares patients the trauma of surgery and cuts total per-patient costs. As the research magazine Pictures of the Future reports in its latest issue, the procedure has to date been performed on over 150 patients in Europe with an average age of 78.


For tens of thousands of people each year it is the end of the line. If they are too frail to survive open heart surgery, many patients with aortic valve disease only have about two to three years to live. An ongoing stenosis of the valve resulting from calcification of the leaflets that allow oxygen-rich blood to flow from the left ventricle of the heart into the circulatory system, aortic valve disease affects about four percent of people 65 and older. Indeed, some 60,000 open heart aortic valve replacement operations are performed each year in Europe.

The new procedure is based on the use of Siemens’ DynaCT 3D cardiac angiographic imaging system. DynaCT provides exquisitely detailed images of the thorax. But during aortic valve implantation, what the surgeon wants to see in particular is the aortic root. With this in mind, Siemens researchers have developed a technology that automatically identifies the aortic valve area in a DynaCT data set and segments it—that is, eliminates everything that is not important, such as the rib cage, from the picture.

As the replacement valve approaches the area of interest wrapped in the tip of a catheter, unique software makes it possible to identify the optimum angulation of the new valve. This information is crucial in terms of correctly placing the device so that it covers the old valve without permitting leakage or covering the end points of the coronary arteries, which would cause an immediate heart attack. When the prosthesis is in precisely the right position, a balloon inside the catheter unfurls, thus opening the prosthesis and pressing it firmly against the aortic wall.

The technology results from a clinical cooperation between Siemens Healthcare, the Leipzig Heart Center, and the German Heart Center in Munich, as well as Siemens Corporate Research (SCR) in Princeton, New Jersey. It may also become available in the U.S. in the near future.

Disclaimer: On account of certain regional limitations of sales rights and service availability, Siemens cannot guarantee that the products included in this document are available through the Siemens sales organization worldwide. Availability and packaging may vary by country and are subject to change without prior notice. Some/All of the features and products described herein may not be available in the United States.

The information in this document contains general technical descriptions of specifications and options as well as standard and optional features which do not always have to be present in individual cases. Siemens reserves the right to modify the design, packaging, specifications, and options described herein without prior notice. Please contact your local Siemens sales representative for the most current information.

Dr. Norbert Aschenbrenner | Siemens ResearchNews
Further information:
http://www.siemens.com/researchnews

More articles from Medical Engineering:

nachricht Novel PET tracer identifies most bacterial infections
06.10.2017 | Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging

nachricht Teleoperating robots with virtual reality
05.10.2017 | Massachusetts Institute of Technology, CSAIL

All articles from Medical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Neutron star merger directly observed for the first time

University of Maryland researchers contribute to historic detection of gravitational waves and light created by event

On August 17, 2017, at 12:41:04 UTC, scientists made the first direct observation of a merger between two neutron stars--the dense, collapsed cores that remain...

Im Focus: Breaking: the first light from two neutron stars merging

Seven new papers describe the first-ever detection of light from a gravitational wave source. The event, caused by two neutron stars colliding and merging together, was dubbed GW170817 because it sent ripples through space-time that reached Earth on 2017 August 17. Around the world, hundreds of excited astronomers mobilized quickly and were able to observe the event using numerous telescopes, providing a wealth of new data.

Previous detections of gravitational waves have all involved the merger of two black holes, a feat that won the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics earlier this month....

Im Focus: Smart sensors for efficient processes

Material defects in end products can quickly result in failures in many areas of industry, and have a massive impact on the safe use of their products. This is why, in the field of quality assurance, intelligent, nondestructive sensor systems play a key role. They allow testing components and parts in a rapid and cost-efficient manner without destroying the actual product or changing its surface. Experts from the Fraunhofer IZFP in Saarbrücken will be presenting two exhibits at the Blechexpo in Stuttgart from 7–10 November 2017 that allow fast, reliable, and automated characterization of materials and detection of defects (Hall 5, Booth 5306).

When quality testing uses time-consuming destructive test methods, it can result in enormous costs due to damaging or destroying the products. And given that...

Im Focus: Cold molecules on collision course

Using a new cooling technique MPQ scientists succeed at observing collisions in a dense beam of cold and slow dipolar molecules.

How do chemical reactions proceed at extremely low temperatures? The answer requires the investigation of molecular samples that are cold, dense, and slow at...

Im Focus: Shrinking the proton again!

Scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, using high precision laser spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen, confirm the surprisingly small value of the proton radius determined from muonic hydrogen.

It was one of the breakthroughs of the year 2010: Laser spectroscopy of muonic hydrogen resulted in a value for the proton charge radius that was significantly...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ASEAN Member States discuss the future role of renewable energy

17.10.2017 | Event News

World Health Summit 2017: International experts set the course for the future of Global Health

10.10.2017 | Event News

Climate Engineering Conference 2017 Opens in Berlin

10.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Terahertz spectroscopy goes nano

20.10.2017 | Information Technology

Strange but true: Turning a material upside down can sometimes make it softer

20.10.2017 | Materials Sciences

NRL clarifies valley polarization for electronic and optoelectronic technologies

20.10.2017 | Interdisciplinary Research

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>