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Siemens to modernize large sections of the Belgian railway network

04.08.2015
  • Order volume for the consortium worth about 510 million euros
  • Technology enhances safety, punctuality and capacity on the tracks
  • Foundation for merging of European railway traffic

In a consortium together with the Cofely-Fabricom (GDF SUEZ) infrastructure development company, Siemens is to equip more than 2,200 track kilometers of the Belgian railway network with the ETCS European Train Control System, Level 2. The order was placed by Infrabel, the Belgian railway infrastructure operator. The order volume for the consortium is worth about 510 million euros.


Bei Trainguard 200 RBC für ETCS Level 2 werden die Fahrbefehle als standardisierte Telegramme per GSM-R/Euroradio auf das Fahrzeug übertragen.

The ETCS European Train Control System constitutes an essential component for the merging of European railway traffic. It is designed to replace the more than 20 national automatic train protection (ATP) systems on the European continent and enhance network safety and capacity. The project is scheduled for completion by the end of 2025. The contract includes installation of the ATP system and the electronic interlocking equipment.

"This order underscores our leading position in the field of automatic train protection systems," commented Jochen Eickholt, Head of the Mobility Division at Siemens. "Siemens has already successfully installed ETCS Level 1 for the Belgian railways." The ETCS European Train Control System Level 2 uses the railway-specific GSM-R mobile radio system to ensure a permanent two-way radio connection between the vehicle and trackside. This not only makes continuous speed monitoring possible, it also means that new movement authorities can immediately be transmitted to the vehicle and all relevant information is displayed to the driver in the driver's cab. Siemens is currently equipping lines in Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Spain, Turkey and Hungary with this highly automated system.


Siemens AG (Berlin and Munich) is a global technology powerhouse that has stood for engineering excellence, innovation, quality, reliability and internationality for more than 165 years. The company is active in more than 200 countries, focusing on the areas of electrification, automation and digitalization. One of the world's largest producers of energy-efficient, resource-saving technologies, Siemens is No. 1 in offshore wind turbine construction, a leading supplier of combined cycle turbines for power generation, a leading provider of power transmission solutions and a pioneer in infrastructure solutions and automation and software solutions for industry. The company is also a leading supplier of medical imaging equipment – such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging systems – and a leader in laboratory diagnostics. In fiscal 2013, which ended on September 30, 2013, revenue from continuing operations totaled €75.9 billion and income from continuing operations €4.2 billion. At the end of September 2013, Siemens had around 362,000 employees worldwide on the basis of continuing operations.

Further information is available on the Internet at www.siemens.com


Reference Number: PR2015080288MOEN


Contact
Ms. Silke Reh
Mobility Division
Siemens AG

Otto-Hahn-Ring 6

81739 Munich

Germany

Tel: +49 (89) 636-630368

silke.reh​@siemens.com

Silke Reh | Siemens Mobility

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