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Siemens signaling technology links Europe and Asia

29.10.2013
The Turkish State Railways opened the roughly 13-kilometer-long Marmaray tunnel in Istanbul for revenue service on October 29, 2013. Siemens supplied the entire signaling and control technology.

The tunnel is the centerpiece of one of the biggest transport infrastructure projects in the world. Running under the Bosporus, it now links the rapid transit lines on the European side of Istanbul with those on the Asian. Trains operating at two-minute intervals will transport up to 75,000 passengers per hour through this new tunnel between Asia and Europe.



The Turkish State Railways opened the roughly 13-kilometer-long Marmaray tunnel in Istanbul for revenue service on October 29, 2013. Siemens supplied the entire signaling and control technology. The tunnel is the centerpiece of one of the biggest transport infrastructure projects in the world.

The Turkish State Railways opened the roughly 13-kilometer-long Marmaray tunnel in Istanbul for revenue service on October 29, 2013. Siemens supplied the entire signaling and control technology. The tunnel is the centerpiece of one of the biggest transport infrastructure projects in the world.

With its nearly 15 million inhabitants, Istanbul is one the world's largest cities. The only previous connections between both parts of the city were provided by ferries and two bridges for road traffic. In an effort to reduce chronic traffic congestion and the associated environmental impact, the government is massively expanding the urban transport infrastructure. Siemens automated the rapid transit services for the new tunnel with a radio-based automatic train control system (Trainguard Sirius), electronic interlockings (Trackguard Westrace) and the operations control system (Controlguide Rail 9000), which monitors the traffic and controls the interlockings and the infrastructure.

Furthermore, the tunnel will be expanded in a second phase to accommodate not only rapid transit services, but also long-distance passenger trains. As of 2015, the Marmaray tunnel should be the first standard-gauge rail link between Europe and Asia. The line will have an overall length of 76 kilometers. Travel time between the cities of Gebze and Halkali will then be cut in half to around one and a half hours. Siemens has already automated the tunnel for mainline service and thus installed the European train control system (European Railway Traffic Management System) Level 1.

Siemens has also equipped Line 1 of the Istanbul Metro with rail signaling and communications technology. The company also supplied the control and signaling systems for the 21-kilometer-long extension of that line, which was commissioned in 2012. In the mainline sector, the ETCS signaling system was installed by Siemens on sections of the Bandirma – Menemen line and on the route linking the industrial center Konya and the capital Ankara, one of the most important railway lines in Turkey.

Press pictures on the topic: www.siemens.com/press/Marmaray

Follow us on Twitter: www.twitter.com/siemens_press

The Siemens Infrastructure & Cities Sector (Munich, Germany), with approximately 90,000 employees, focuses on sustainable technologies for metropolitan areas and their infrastructures. Its offering includes products, systems and solutions for intelligent traffic management, rail-bound transportation, smart grids, power distribution, energy efficient buildings, and safety and security. The Sector comprises the divisions Building Technologies, Low and Medium Voltage, Mobility and Logistics, Rail Systems and Smart Grid. For more information, visit http://www.siemens.com/infrastructure-cities

Siemens' Mobility and Logistics Division (Munich, Germany) is a leading international provider of integrated technologies that enable people and goods to be transported in an efficient, safe and environmentally-friendly manner. The areas covered include rail automation, intelligent traffic and transportation systems, and logistics solutions for airports, postal and parcel business. Through its portfolio the Division combines innovations with comprehensive industry know-how in its products, services and IT-based solutions. Further information can be found at:http://www.siemens.com/mobility-logistics/

Reference Number: ICMOL20131002e

Contact
Mr. Stefan Wagner
Mobility and Logistics Division
Siemens AG
Otto-Hahn-Ring 6
81739 Munich
Germany
Tel: +49 (89) 636-632041
sw.wagner​@siemens.com

Stefan Wagner | Siemens Infrastructure
Further information:
http://www.siemens.com/infrastructure-cities

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