Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Research Addresses Security of Inland Waterways

07.09.2011
Transportation researchers at the University of Arkansas are working to develop a national decision-support system to help local, state and federal law-enforcement and emergency-management agencies identify commercially important rivers and infrastructure that may be especially vulnerable to a terrorist attack or natural disaster.

“We’re trying to develop a fundamental understanding of the critical interdependence of multi-modal and intermodal transportation systems as they relate to the nation’s inland waterway system,” said Heather Nachtmann, associate professor of industrial engineering and director of the Mack-Blackwell Rural Transportation Center. “Specifically, we want to enable law-enforcement and emergency-management agencies by providing vital information about commercially important rivers and the various infrastructure connected to these rivers.”

The United States has approximately 12,000 navigable miles of commercially used rivers that may be vulnerable to attack, natural disaster or accidental events, Nachtmann said. If such an event were to occur, commercial traffic on these rivers could not be quickly or easily replaced by other modes of transportation, such as rail or trucking, to re-route goods and services. The loss of these waterways and related infrastructure, such as bridges, canal locks and pipelines, would have immediate and adverse social and economic impacts on a region or possibly the entire nation.

With $200,000 in initial funding from Homeland Security, Nachtmann and colleagues at the Mack-Blackwell Center are developing a system, called Supporting Secure and Resilient Inland Waterways, that they hope will evolve into a prototype for the decision-support system. The project includes geospatial data, computer-based cargo prioritization and freight-routing models, and an emergency response model for inland waterway transportation systems. The researchers recently received $220,000 in additional funding to continue the project.

A primary goal of the project is to understand the interdependence of transportation systems that use water, land and rail for shipping goods. Specifically, the researchers seek to quantify the impact of this interdependence on the vulnerability and resiliency of inland waterway transportation.

“Vulnerability and resilience are ‘two sides of the same coin,’ as both represent the capability of the system to withstand threats,” Nachtmann said. “Vulnerability represents where and how the system can be affected by threats, whereas resilience represents the ability of the system to recover from those threats.”

Previously, Nachtmann and researchers at the Mack-Blackwell Center conducted a seminal study on the security of U.S. rural transportation networks. This study provided an efficient tool to assess the vulnerability of rural transportation assets and was designed to help officials develop and implement plans for emergency preparedness.

Authorized by the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991, the Mack-Blackwell Rural Transportation Center develops comprehensive research, education and training in rural transportation systems. As a Department of Homeland Security National Transportation Security Center of Excellence, the center is dedicated to solving critical scientific and technological issues related to transportation security.

Nachtmann is holder of the John L. Imhoff Endowed Chair of Industrial Engineering in the College of Engineering at the University of Arkansas.

Heather Nachtmann | Newswise Science News
Further information:
http://www.uark.edu

More articles from Transportation and Logistics:

nachricht Experiments show that a few self-driving cars can dramatically improve traffic flow
10.05.2017 | University of Illinois College of Engineering

nachricht Tool helps cities to plan electric bus routes, and calculate the benefits
09.01.2017 | International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)

All articles from Transportation and Logistics >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Can the immune system be boosted against Staphylococcus aureus by delivery of messenger RNA?

Staphylococcus aureus is a feared pathogen (MRSA, multi-resistant S. aureus) due to frequent resistances against many antibiotics, especially in hospital infections. Researchers at the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut have identified immunological processes that prevent a successful immune response directed against the pathogenic agent. The delivery of bacterial proteins with RNA adjuvant or messenger RNA (mRNA) into immune cells allows the re-direction of the immune response towards an active defense against S. aureus. This could be of significant importance for the development of an effective vaccine. PLOS Pathogens has published these research results online on 25 May 2017.

Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a bacterium that colonizes by far more than half of the skin and the mucosa of adults, usually without causing infections....

Im Focus: A quantum walk of photons

Physicists from the University of Würzburg are capable of generating identical looking single light particles at the push of a button. Two new studies now demonstrate the potential this method holds.

The quantum computer has fuelled the imagination of scientists for decades: It is based on fundamentally different phenomena than a conventional computer....

Im Focus: Turmoil in sluggish electrons’ existence

An international team of physicists has monitored the scattering behaviour of electrons in a non-conducting material in real-time. Their insights could be beneficial for radiotherapy.

We can refer to electrons in non-conducting materials as ‘sluggish’. Typically, they remain fixed in a location, deep inside an atomic composite. It is hence...

Im Focus: Wafer-thin Magnetic Materials Developed for Future Quantum Technologies

Two-dimensional magnetic structures are regarded as a promising material for new types of data storage, since the magnetic properties of individual molecular building blocks can be investigated and modified. For the first time, researchers have now produced a wafer-thin ferrimagnet, in which molecules with different magnetic centers arrange themselves on a gold surface to form a checkerboard pattern. Scientists at the Swiss Nanoscience Institute at the University of Basel and the Paul Scherrer Institute published their findings in the journal Nature Communications.

Ferrimagnets are composed of two centers which are magnetized at different strengths and point in opposing directions. Two-dimensional, quasi-flat ferrimagnets...

Im Focus: World's thinnest hologram paves path to new 3-D world

Nano-hologram paves way for integration of 3-D holography into everyday electronics

An Australian-Chinese research team has created the world's thinnest hologram, paving the way towards the integration of 3D holography into everyday...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Marine Conservation: IASS Contributes to UN Ocean Conference in New York on 5-9 June

24.05.2017 | Event News

AWK Aachen Machine Tool Colloquium 2017: Internet of Production for Agile Enterprises

23.05.2017 | Event News

Dortmund MST Conference presents Individualized Healthcare Solutions with micro and nanotechnology

22.05.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

How herpesviruses win the footrace against the immune system

26.05.2017 | Life Sciences

Water forms 'spine of hydration' around DNA, group finds

26.05.2017 | Life Sciences

First Juno science results supported by University of Leicester's Jupiter 'forecast'

26.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>