Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:


UWE design graduate shows speed cameras in a new light

Speed cameras may be unpopular with motorists – but by redesigning them to include illuminated speed signs, could they be seen as contributing to improved road safety? Graduate Steve Harris from the University of the West of England's Creative Product Design course believes so, and unveiled the new design at the international Traffex exhibition in Birmingham in April.

He is taking part in a new UWE scheme called the Graduate Consultancy Scheme to place recent graduates in industrial settings to share the best in design knowledge.

The UK's main manufacturers of speed camera housings, Portishead-based Crown UK, contacted UWE for help in changing public perceptions about their products, and increasing awareness of the safety benefits of speed cameras.

Under the supervision of Creative Product Design course leader, Tod Burton, Steve started by looking at the appearance of the camera housing, but then began to explore all the issues involved in the design and operation of speed cameras. He said:

“Talking to police authorities and other end-users of the equipment, I discovered all the design problems that needed to be addressed, such as ease of maintenance and installation, providing road safety messages, and the impact of digital technologies, as well as cost.”

The company was so impressed with this approach that the initial six-week placement was extended for a further twelve weeks. A range of new designs was proposed and in the end the company opted for a design known as StreetSmart, in which the camera is incorporated into an illuminated speed sign and is more likely to be viewed as safety equipment that protects the neighbourhood in which it is installed.

The managing director of Crown UK, Ian Woodbury, said:

“I was impressed by the psychological impact that speed camera housing design could have on the community and authorities. Giving the housing a softer image and incorporating other road safety features without doubt emphasises the safety angle.”

The range is now in prototype production and undergoing testing at a roadside location as part of the Home Office approval procedure.

Tod Burton said: “This has been a real success story for Crown and for UWE's Graduate Consultancy Scheme. We have shown how product design thinking has the power to influence a manufacturer's bottom line, a critical advantage at a time when British manufacturing faces global competition.”

UWE's Graduate Consultancy Scheme organises placements lasting around ten weeks with small or medium sized manufacturers who benefit from a dedicated graduate to work on a specific project, with input and supervision from expert staff from the relevant course. The scheme gives the graduate valuable experience that could enhance their employability – in fact two graduates on the scheme have already been offered permanent employment with the manufacturers after their placement ended.

Lesley Drake | alfa
Further information:

More articles from Transportation and Logistics:

nachricht Bremen University students reach the final at robotics competition with parcel delivery robot
19.10.2016 | BIBA - Bremer Institut für Produktion und Logistik

nachricht Discovering electric mobility in a playful way
18.08.2016 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Arbeitswirtschaft und Organisation IAO

All articles from Transportation and Logistics >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: New 3-D wiring technique brings scalable quantum computers closer to reality

Researchers from the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) at the University of Waterloo led the development of a new extensible wiring technique capable of controlling superconducting quantum bits, representing a significant step towards to the realization of a scalable quantum computer.

"The quantum socket is a wiring method that uses three-dimensional wires based on spring-loaded pins to address individual qubits," said Jeremy Béjanin, a PhD...

Im Focus: Scientists develop a semiconductor nanocomposite material that moves in response to light

In a paper in Scientific Reports, a research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute describes a novel light-activated phenomenon that could become the basis for applications as diverse as microscopic robotic grippers and more efficient solar cells.

A research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) has developed a revolutionary, light-activated semiconductor nanocomposite material that can be used...

Im Focus: Diamonds aren't forever: Sandia, Harvard team create first quantum computer bridge

By forcefully embedding two silicon atoms in a diamond matrix, Sandia researchers have demonstrated for the first time on a single chip all the components needed to create a quantum bridge to link quantum computers together.

"People have already built small quantum computers," says Sandia researcher Ryan Camacho. "Maybe the first useful one won't be a single giant quantum computer...

Im Focus: New Products - Highlights of COMPAMED 2016

COMPAMED has become the leading international marketplace for suppliers of medical manufacturing. The trade fair, which takes place every November and is co-located to MEDICA in Dusseldorf, has been steadily growing over the past years and shows that medical technology remains a rapidly growing market.

In 2016, the joint pavilion by the IVAM Microtechnology Network, the Product Market “High-tech for Medical Devices”, will be located in Hall 8a again and will...

Im Focus: Ultra-thin ferroelectric material for next-generation electronics

'Ferroelectric' materials can switch between different states of electrical polarization in response to an external electric field. This flexibility means they show promise for many applications, for example in electronic devices and computer memory. Current ferroelectric materials are highly valued for their thermal and chemical stability and rapid electro-mechanical responses, but creating a material that is scalable down to the tiny sizes needed for technologies like silicon-based semiconductors (Si-based CMOS) has proven challenging.

Now, Hiroshi Funakubo and co-workers at the Tokyo Institute of Technology, in collaboration with researchers across Japan, have conducted experiments to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>



Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

Agricultural Trade Developments and Potentials in Central Asia and the South Caucasus

14.10.2016 | Event News

World Health Summit – Day Three: A Call to Action

12.10.2016 | Event News

Latest News

Resolving the mystery of preeclampsia

21.10.2016 | Health and Medicine

Stanford researchers create new special-purpose computer that may someday save us billions

21.10.2016 | Information Technology

From ancient fossils to future cars

21.10.2016 | Materials Sciences

More VideoLinks >>>