Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Smart system will prevent aircraft collisions

10.05.2007
A new Norwegian invention will stop planes and helicopters from colliding with high-tension power lines, wind turbines, communications towers and offshore platforms. Collisions with power cables alone are the cause of ten percent of all aviation accidents in Norway. As well as loss of human lives, such accidents have cost the Norwegian Air Force more than half a billion kroner in the course of the past 15 years.

Until now, orange balloons on power lines, brightly painted masts and lights have been the only warning that pilots receive when they are approaching and obstacle. But bad weather and poor light may reduce visibility to the point at which it is impossible to see an obstacle before it is too late.

The new warning system, which two Norwegian pilots have developed in collaboration with SINTEF, warns pilots of a collision hazard irrespective or weather and visibility conditions. The system continuously monitors the air-space in the vicinity of a hazard, and warns pilots by radio of the danger of collision.

Awarded prize

The five scientists involved in the project have just shared SINTEF’s 2006 Prize for Outstanding Research. The award which is worth NOK 100 000, can go to current or former employees of the SINTEF Group.

The core of the system is a high-technology mast that is installed near the obstacle. The mast houses radar and information systems that register whether an aircraft is on course to collide with the hazard.

When the aircraft is 30 seconds away the system actives powerful flashing lights. If avoiding action is not taken by the time that the aircraft is 20 seconds off and it continues on a collision course, a VHF transmitter in the mast is activated. This gives the pilot a clear and easily recognisable auditory signal, which is transmitted over all VHF air traffic channels in order to ensure that it reaches the pilot.

Available for everyone.

The system does not require any special installation or added investment in aircraft themselves. It warns any planes that is in danger of colliding with an obstacle, irrespective of its type or nationality.

Pilots Rolf Bakken and Morten Mørk had the idea of a radio warning system for pilots in 1999. They approached SINTEF, which completed the system with radar technology in order to prevent it from giving false alarms to planes that were not actually on a collision course with an obstacle.

In 2000, Bakken and Mørk set up a new company, Obstacle Collision Avoidance System (OCAS) AS to produce and market the system. The company’s premises are in Oslo, and it has 17 employees.

To date, three trial systems have been installed in Norway, and test flights have confirmed that they work as they were intended to do.

Aase Dragland | alfa
Further information:
http://www.sintef.no

More articles from Transportation and Logistics:

nachricht Tool helps cities to plan electric bus routes, and calculate the benefits
09.01.2017 | International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)

nachricht Realistic training for extreme flight conditions
28.12.2016 | Technical University of Munich (TUM)

All articles from Transportation and Logistics >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Making lightweight construction suitable for series production

More and more automobile companies are focusing on body parts made of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP). However, manufacturing and repair costs must be further reduced in order to make CFRP more economical in use. Together with the Volkswagen AG and five other partners in the project HolQueSt 3D, the Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V. (LZH) has developed laser processes for the automatic trimming, drilling and repair of three-dimensional components.

Automated manufacturing processes are the basis for ultimately establishing the series production of CFRP components. In the project HolQueSt 3D, the LZH has...

Im Focus: Wonder material? Novel nanotube structure strengthens thin films for flexible electronics

Reflecting the structure of composites found in nature and the ancient world, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have synthesized thin carbon nanotube (CNT) textiles that exhibit both high electrical conductivity and a level of toughness that is about fifty times higher than copper films, currently used in electronics.

"The structural robustness of thin metal films has significant importance for the reliable operation of smart skin and flexible electronics including...

Im Focus: Deep inside Galaxy M87

The nearby, giant radio galaxy M87 hosts a supermassive black hole (BH) and is well-known for its bright jet dominating the spectrum over ten orders of magnitude in frequency. Due to its proximity, jet prominence, and the large black hole mass, M87 is the best laboratory for investigating the formation, acceleration, and collimation of relativistic jets. A research team led by Silke Britzen from the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy in Bonn, Germany, has found strong indication for turbulent processes connecting the accretion disk and the jet of that galaxy providing insights into the longstanding problem of the origin of astrophysical jets.

Supermassive black holes form some of the most enigmatic phenomena in astrophysics. Their enormous energy output is supposed to be generated by the...

Im Focus: A Quantum Low Pass for Photons

Physicists in Garching observe novel quantum effect that limits the number of emitted photons.

The probability to find a certain number of photons inside a laser pulse usually corresponds to a classical distribution of independent events, the so-called...

Im Focus: Microprocessors based on a layer of just three atoms

Microprocessors based on atomically thin materials hold the promise of the evolution of traditional processors as well as new applications in the field of flexible electronics. Now, a TU Wien research team led by Thomas Müller has made a breakthrough in this field as part of an ongoing research project.

Two-dimensional materials, or 2D materials for short, are extremely versatile, although – or often more precisely because – they are made up of just one or a...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Expert meeting “Health Business Connect” will connect international medical technology companies

20.04.2017 | Event News

Wenn der Computer das Gehirn austrickst

18.04.2017 | Event News

7th International Conference on Crystalline Silicon Photovoltaics in Freiburg on April 3-5, 2017

03.04.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Bare bones: Making bones transparent

27.04.2017 | Life Sciences

Study offers new theoretical approach to describing non-equilibrium phase transitions

27.04.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

From volcano's slope, NASA instrument looks sky high and to the future

27.04.2017 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>