Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

CESAR could hail cheaper and greener small aircraft

05.02.2007
A £280,000 grant to engineers at the University of Manchester could help spark the development of cheaper, lighter and greener small passenger aircraft.

A team from the Power Conversion Group at the University will use the money to investigate how current mechanical and hydraulic systems on small aircraft - such as private jets and those used for short flights - can be improved using more advanced electrical engineering.

The research forms part of the Cost Effective Small Aircraft (CESAR) project, which involves 35 commercial and academic organisations right across the European Union.

All aspects of aircraft design and development will be examined during the EU-funded project, with the ultimate aim to produce a new concept for aircraft with between 10 and 50 seats.

It's hoped it will ultimately lead to lower development, running and maintenance costs, while still ensuring good passenger safety and comfort, and lower environmental impact.

In comparison to the latest breed of high-tech jumbo jets, which feature advanced electrical systems, small passenger aircraft tend to use control systems that have not seen any significant technical advance for a number of years.

Dr Nigel Schofield and a small team of researchers will concentrate on developing electrical systems to operate external flight control surfaces like the rudder, wing flaps and the landing gear.

It's believed that reduced mass and improvements in energy efficiency achieved by the introduction of electromechanical and electrohydraulic systems will bring down the cost of aircraft manufacture and operation.

Replacing bulky mechanics and hydraulics with more electrically based systems could also allow a small aircraft to carry more passengers and therefore reduce the carbon footprint of each traveller. Less mass would also mean less fuel burn and less carbon dioxide being pumped into the atmosphere.

Dr Schofield, who works in the Power Conversion Group within The School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, said: "With the increasing popularity of air travel, the demand for smaller commercial aircraft is likely to increase in coming years.

"The view is that short haul flights within Europe will become more extensive as the Eastern European counties expand their trade with the West.

"The grant we have received will allow us to employ two full-time researchers to carry out extensive research into how electromechanical and electrohydraulic systems can be effectively applied within small aircraft.

"This is an exciting project involving many partners across Europe, and particularly from Eastern Europe.

"It certainly won't provide a solution to the huge problem of aircraft emissions, but it could lead to cheaper, smarter and more environmentally friendly aircraft taking to the skies."

Jon Keighren | alfa
Further information:
http://www.manchester.ac.uk/eps

More articles from Transportation and Logistics:

nachricht Study sets new distance record for medical drone transport
13.09.2017 | Johns Hopkins Medicine

nachricht Researchers 'count cars' -- literally -- to find a better way to control heavy traffic
10.08.2017 | Florida Atlantic University

All articles from Transportation and Logistics >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Scientists channel graphene to understand filtration and ion transport into cells

Tiny pores at a cell's entryway act as miniature bouncers, letting in some electrically charged atoms--ions--but blocking others. Operating as exquisitely sensitive filters, these "ion channels" play a critical role in biological functions such as muscle contraction and the firing of brain cells.

To rapidly transport the right ions through the cell membrane, the tiny channels rely on a complex interplay between the ions and surrounding molecules,...

Im Focus: Towards data storage at the single molecule level

The miniaturization of the current technology of storage media is hindered by fundamental limits of quantum mechanics. A new approach consists in using so-called spin-crossover molecules as the smallest possible storage unit. Similar to normal hard drives, these special molecules can save information via their magnetic state. A research team from Kiel University has now managed to successfully place a new class of spin-crossover molecules onto a surface and to improve the molecule’s storage capacity. The storage density of conventional hard drives could therefore theoretically be increased by more than one hundred fold. The study has been published in the scientific journal Nano Letters.

Over the past few years, the building blocks of storage media have gotten ever smaller. But further miniaturization of the current technology is hindered by...

Im Focus: Successful Mechanical Testing of Nanowires

With innovative experiments, researchers at the Helmholtz-Zentrums Geesthacht and the Technical University Hamburg unravel why tiny metallic structures are extremely strong

Light-weight and simultaneously strong – porous metallic nanomaterials promise interesting applications as, for instance, for future aeroplanes with enhanced...

Im Focus: Virtual Reality for Bacteria

An interdisciplinary group of researchers interfaced individual bacteria with a computer to build a hybrid bio-digital circuit - Study published in Nature Communications

Scientists at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria) have managed to control the behavior of individual bacteria by connecting them to a...

Im Focus: A space-time sensor for light-matter interactions

Physicists in the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics (run jointly by LMU Munich and the Max Planck Institute for Quantum Optics) have developed an attosecond electron microscope that allows them to visualize the dispersion of light in time and space, and observe the motions of electrons in atoms.

The most basic of all physical interactions in nature is that between light and matter. This interaction takes place in attosecond times (i.e. billionths of a...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

See, understand and experience the work of the future

11.12.2017 | Event News

Innovative strategies to tackle parasitic worms

08.12.2017 | Event News

AKL’18: The opportunities and challenges of digitalization in the laser industry

07.12.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Midwife and signpost for photons

11.12.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

How do megacities impact coastal seas? Searching for evidence in Chinese marginal seas

11.12.2017 | Earth Sciences

PhoxTroT: Optical Interconnect Technologies Revolutionized Data Centers and HPC Systems

11.12.2017 | Information Technology

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>