Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Cruise control - even in traffic

19.05.2004


"We can drive from Amsterdam to Rotterdam in the rush hour, and we can do it without touching either the accelerator or the brakes!" says Peter Hendrickx, coordinator of the DenseTraffic project, speaking about the new RoadEye radar sensor the project has developed.



Second-generation adaptive cruise control

The RoadEye radar sensor is a vital component in the new second generation of Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC) systems for vehicles. Unlike the ACC fitted to several upmarket cars today, the coming second generation systems need to be able to handle very low speeds and dense traffic (hence the project name) where vehicles may be typically only 15-16 metres apart.


These 2nd generation ACC systems will be able to stay in control of a vehicle’s engine and brakes at speeds of anything between zero and 250 kilometres per hour, in a straight line and in road bends of much tighter radius than before, and handle the situation of vehicles cutting in front of you. They can even cope with traffic coming completely to a halt and starting off again, a situation typical of today’s congested roads.

Working prototype shown to car makers

What makes these capabilities possible is the RoadEye sensor developed within this IST programme funded project, which finished in December 2003. RoadEye is a new multi-beam radar sensor with a more sophisticated antenna system, a wider angle of view (hence the abilities with road bends), and an IC architecture optimised for low-cost production.

The DenseTraffic project partners have fitted a working RoadEye prototype into a demonstration vehicle to show the system’s capabilities. Hendrickx is justifiably proud of the project results. "So far no other radar sensor has been able to do what RoadEye can do."

An Audi S8 fitted with the unit has been exhibited to most of the major European car-makers, as well as to companies involved in vehicle systems development. While visiting the US, the project partners even fitted a RoadEye unit into a Mercedes S Class vehicle in place of the standard sensor, to show how the ACC system could be improved.

Groeneveld is now actively marketing the RoadEye radar sensor to vehicle manufacturers and systems developers around the world. The company is also researching how to develop a turnkey ACC package capable of meeting the needs of customers that require a complete system.

Contact:
Peter Hendrickx
Groeneveld Groep B.V.
Stephensonweg 12
PO Box 777
4200 AT Gorinchem
The Netherlands
Tel: +31-18-3641400
Fax: +31-18-3626211
Email: phendrickx@groeneveld.nl

Source: Based on information from DenseTraffic

Tara Morris | IST Results
Further information:
http://istresults.cordis.lu/index.cfm?section=news&tpl=article&ID=65145

More articles from Transportation and Logistics:

nachricht From parking garage to smart multi-purpose garage
19.07.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Arbeitswirtschaft und Organisation IAO

nachricht Efficient and intelligent: Drones get to grips with planning the delivery of goods
12.07.2017 | Alpen-Adria-Universität Klagenfurt

All articles from Transportation and Logistics >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Manipulating Electron Spins Without Loss of Information

Physicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute. The results have been published in Physical Review X.

For several years, researchers have been trying to use the spin of an electron to store and transmit information. The spin of each electron is always coupled...

Im Focus: The proton precisely weighted

What is the mass of a proton? Scientists from Germany and Japan successfully did an important step towards the most exact knowledge of this fundamental constant. By means of precision measurements on a single proton, they could improve the precision by a factor of three and also correct the existing value.

To determine the mass of a single proton still more accurate – a group of physicists led by Klaus Blaum and Sven Sturm of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear...

Im Focus: On the way to a biological alternative

A bacterial enzyme enables reactions that open up alternatives to key industrial chemical processes

The research team of Prof. Dr. Oliver Einsle at the University of Freiburg's Institute of Biochemistry has long been exploring the functioning of nitrogenase....

Im Focus: The 1 trillion tonne iceberg

Larsen C Ice Shelf rift finally breaks through

A one trillion tonne iceberg - one of the biggest ever recorded -- has calved away from the Larsen C Ice Shelf in Antarctica, after a rift in the ice,...

Im Focus: Laser-cooled ions contribute to better understanding of friction

Physics supports biology: Researchers from PTB have developed a model system to investigate friction phenomena with atomic precision

Friction: what you want from car brakes, otherwise rather a nuisance. In any case, it is useful to know as precisely as possible how friction phenomena arise –...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Closing the Sustainability Circle: Protection of Food with Biobased Materials

21.07.2017 | Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

The technology with a feel for feelings

12.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

NASA looks to solar eclipse to help understand Earth's energy system

21.07.2017 | Earth Sciences

Stanford researchers develop a new type of soft, growing robot

21.07.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Vortex photons from electrons in circular motion

21.07.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>