Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Keeping afloat in a sea of information

10.05.2004


With often over 200 alarms installed on today’s ships, the risk of information overload is real. TELEMAS’ tool can track and manage alarms by taking input from the various computers and alarms on board and presenting them to the crew in a uniform and structured way.



With funding from the IST programme TELEMAS developed a middleware tool called Umbrella. "It brings together information from various data sources on board. For instance, you might have a cruise vessel that has over 1,000 gas and fire detectors installed, organised into various zones," says TELEMAS project manager Karsten Bruns-Schüler of ISSUS, at the Hamburg University of Applied Sciences.

"The problem is that there are no two ships the same," adds Schüler. "When crew first come on board, it’s often the case that they have only a few hours to familiarise themselves with the ship before the set off. The chances are that they will find it difficult to locate particular menus on the various support computers and will have had only a brief introduction to the main systems."


"An alarm might be raised to say that a fault has developed in one of the zones and that maintenance is required. A ship’s crew does not usually include an electronics technician, but Umbrella enables the alarm information to be assessed by technical staff on shore who can suggest remedial action."

The Umbrella tool was in action at Hamburg last February. "Over fifty visitors, mostly key management from shipping companies, saw the system in action," says Schüler, "and the feedback has been very positive. Prospects for system are looking good, too. One of the TELEMAS partners, Columbia Ship Management, is carrying out trials with six of their vessels linked to shore-based technical support, and another partner, Consilium, is preparing to market a commercial version of Umbrella towards the end of the year."

Contact:
Karsten Bruns-Schüler
University of Applied Sciences Hamburg
Institute of Ship Operation, Sea Transport and Simulation (ISSUS)
Rainvilleterrasse
D-422765 Hamburg
Germany
Tel: +49-40-428756641
Fax: +49-40-428756699
Email: schueler@issus.haw-hamburg.de

Tara Morris | IST Results
Further information:
http://istresults.cordis.lu/index.cfm?section=news&tpl=article&ID=64998

More articles from Transportation and Logistics:

nachricht Tool helps cities to plan electric bus routes, and calculate the benefits
09.01.2017 | International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)

nachricht Realistic training for extreme flight conditions
28.12.2016 | Technical University of Munich (TUM)

All articles from Transportation and Logistics >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Making lightweight construction suitable for series production

More and more automobile companies are focusing on body parts made of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP). However, manufacturing and repair costs must be further reduced in order to make CFRP more economical in use. Together with the Volkswagen AG and five other partners in the project HolQueSt 3D, the Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V. (LZH) has developed laser processes for the automatic trimming, drilling and repair of three-dimensional components.

Automated manufacturing processes are the basis for ultimately establishing the series production of CFRP components. In the project HolQueSt 3D, the LZH has...

Im Focus: Wonder material? Novel nanotube structure strengthens thin films for flexible electronics

Reflecting the structure of composites found in nature and the ancient world, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have synthesized thin carbon nanotube (CNT) textiles that exhibit both high electrical conductivity and a level of toughness that is about fifty times higher than copper films, currently used in electronics.

"The structural robustness of thin metal films has significant importance for the reliable operation of smart skin and flexible electronics including...

Im Focus: Deep inside Galaxy M87

The nearby, giant radio galaxy M87 hosts a supermassive black hole (BH) and is well-known for its bright jet dominating the spectrum over ten orders of magnitude in frequency. Due to its proximity, jet prominence, and the large black hole mass, M87 is the best laboratory for investigating the formation, acceleration, and collimation of relativistic jets. A research team led by Silke Britzen from the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy in Bonn, Germany, has found strong indication for turbulent processes connecting the accretion disk and the jet of that galaxy providing insights into the longstanding problem of the origin of astrophysical jets.

Supermassive black holes form some of the most enigmatic phenomena in astrophysics. Their enormous energy output is supposed to be generated by the...

Im Focus: A Quantum Low Pass for Photons

Physicists in Garching observe novel quantum effect that limits the number of emitted photons.

The probability to find a certain number of photons inside a laser pulse usually corresponds to a classical distribution of independent events, the so-called...

Im Focus: Microprocessors based on a layer of just three atoms

Microprocessors based on atomically thin materials hold the promise of the evolution of traditional processors as well as new applications in the field of flexible electronics. Now, a TU Wien research team led by Thomas Müller has made a breakthrough in this field as part of an ongoing research project.

Two-dimensional materials, or 2D materials for short, are extremely versatile, although – or often more precisely because – they are made up of just one or a...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Expert meeting “Health Business Connect” will connect international medical technology companies

20.04.2017 | Event News

Wenn der Computer das Gehirn austrickst

18.04.2017 | Event News

7th International Conference on Crystalline Silicon Photovoltaics in Freiburg on April 3-5, 2017

03.04.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Bare bones: Making bones transparent

27.04.2017 | Life Sciences

Study offers new theoretical approach to describing non-equilibrium phase transitions

27.04.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

From volcano's slope, NASA instrument looks sky high and to the future

27.04.2017 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>