Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:


Keeping afloat in a sea of information


With often over 200 alarms installed on today’s ships, the risk of information overload is real. TELEMAS’ tool can track and manage alarms by taking input from the various computers and alarms on board and presenting them to the crew in a uniform and structured way.

With funding from the IST programme TELEMAS developed a middleware tool called Umbrella. "It brings together information from various data sources on board. For instance, you might have a cruise vessel that has over 1,000 gas and fire detectors installed, organised into various zones," says TELEMAS project manager Karsten Bruns-Schüler of ISSUS, at the Hamburg University of Applied Sciences.

"The problem is that there are no two ships the same," adds Schüler. "When crew first come on board, it’s often the case that they have only a few hours to familiarise themselves with the ship before the set off. The chances are that they will find it difficult to locate particular menus on the various support computers and will have had only a brief introduction to the main systems."

"An alarm might be raised to say that a fault has developed in one of the zones and that maintenance is required. A ship’s crew does not usually include an electronics technician, but Umbrella enables the alarm information to be assessed by technical staff on shore who can suggest remedial action."

The Umbrella tool was in action at Hamburg last February. "Over fifty visitors, mostly key management from shipping companies, saw the system in action," says Schüler, "and the feedback has been very positive. Prospects for system are looking good, too. One of the TELEMAS partners, Columbia Ship Management, is carrying out trials with six of their vessels linked to shore-based technical support, and another partner, Consilium, is preparing to market a commercial version of Umbrella towards the end of the year."

Karsten Bruns-Schüler
University of Applied Sciences Hamburg
Institute of Ship Operation, Sea Transport and Simulation (ISSUS)
D-422765 Hamburg
Tel: +49-40-428756641
Fax: +49-40-428756699

Tara Morris | IST Results
Further information:

More articles from Transportation and Logistics:

nachricht Bremen University students reach the final at robotics competition with parcel delivery robot
19.10.2016 | BIBA - Bremer Institut für Produktion und Logistik

nachricht Discovering electric mobility in a playful way
18.08.2016 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Arbeitswirtschaft und Organisation IAO

All articles from Transportation and Logistics >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Etching Microstructures with Lasers

Ultrafast lasers have introduced new possibilities in engraving ultrafine structures, and scientists are now also investigating how to use them to etch microstructures into thin glass. There are possible applications in analytics (lab on a chip) and especially in electronics and the consumer sector, where great interest has been shown.

This new method was born of a surprising phenomenon: irradiating glass in a particular way with an ultrafast laser has the effect of making the glass up to a...

Im Focus: Light-driven atomic rotations excite magnetic waves

Terahertz excitation of selected crystal vibrations leads to an effective magnetic field that drives coherent spin motion

Controlling functional properties by light is one of the grand goals in modern condensed matter physics and materials science. A new study now demonstrates how...

Im Focus: New 3-D wiring technique brings scalable quantum computers closer to reality

Researchers from the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) at the University of Waterloo led the development of a new extensible wiring technique capable of controlling superconducting quantum bits, representing a significant step towards to the realization of a scalable quantum computer.

"The quantum socket is a wiring method that uses three-dimensional wires based on spring-loaded pins to address individual qubits," said Jeremy Béjanin, a PhD...

Im Focus: Scientists develop a semiconductor nanocomposite material that moves in response to light

In a paper in Scientific Reports, a research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute describes a novel light-activated phenomenon that could become the basis for applications as diverse as microscopic robotic grippers and more efficient solar cells.

A research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) has developed a revolutionary, light-activated semiconductor nanocomposite material that can be used...

Im Focus: Diamonds aren't forever: Sandia, Harvard team create first quantum computer bridge

By forcefully embedding two silicon atoms in a diamond matrix, Sandia researchers have demonstrated for the first time on a single chip all the components needed to create a quantum bridge to link quantum computers together.

"People have already built small quantum computers," says Sandia researcher Ryan Camacho. "Maybe the first useful one won't be a single giant quantum computer...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>



Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

Agricultural Trade Developments and Potentials in Central Asia and the South Caucasus

14.10.2016 | Event News

World Health Summit – Day Three: A Call to Action

12.10.2016 | Event News

Latest News

'Neighbor maps' reveal the genome's 3-D shape

27.10.2016 | Life Sciences

Gene therapy shows promise for treating Niemann-Pick disease type C1

27.10.2016 | Life Sciences

Solid progress in carbon capture

27.10.2016 | Power and Electrical Engineering

More VideoLinks >>>