Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Drive-by-wire closer than you think

07.04.2004


Fly-by-wire control systems are well established in the aerospace industry. Now participants in one IST project, PEIT, have ambitious plans to introduce the same capabilities to road vehicles. The objective? Potentially reducing road accidents within the EU by half!



"We know that 98 per cent of vehicle accidents are caused by driver error," says project leader Ansgar Maisch of DaimlerChrysler, "so giving the driver a virtual assistant able to correct mistakes has the potential to reduce the number of vehicle accidents by half." Such a system could be capable of detecting obstacles in the road or too high a speed on a curve in the road, and take action to control the vehicle, he says.

Taking over the driving


Research in the PEIT project, which is due for completion in August 2004, has focused on an in-vehicle Electronic Control Unit (ECU) that is capable of taking over control from the driver should various sensors indicate a dangerous situation. Such situations could include a heavy truck starting to veer out of its lane if the driver falls asleep for example, or getting dangerously close to the vehicle in front.

The ECU in question is derived from the aircraft industry. In fact it is the unit used in the Airbus A380 aircraft, a dual-duplex architecture that has four separate processors carrying out the same instructions. The result is a highly fail-safe system.

The theory behind the system is based on the idea of there being only one single ’motion vector’ that is correct for any given road and vehicle-position situation. A human driver can attempt any number of motion vectors at any time, i.e. he/she could steer the car in the wrong direction. But only one motion vector is correct, and therefore safe, for a given situation.

Range of vehicle types

PEIT is capable of integrating inputs from any number of vehicle systems, including data from external sources as well as in-vehicle information. It is then able to act on all of the controls that are normally operated directly by the driver, including the engine, gearbox, braking and steering. "So you can have drive-by-wire, steer-by-wire, brake-by-wire and even energy management," says Maisch.

The PEIT platform can be fitted to vehicles of all types and sizes. The project participants already have two working demonstrators, a large truck and a Smart city car, to show the range of vehicle types covered.

The participants believe that PEIT will contribute significantly to increased traffic safety, to improved traffic flow and, last not least, to the comfort of drivers. By developing an intelligent system for driver warning and accident prevention, as well as support for automated driving functions and emergency reactions, PEIT contributes directly to the IST programme’s aim to address the major socio-economic problems facing Europe specifically through systems and services for the citizen.

Future? The virtual driver

Maisch emphasises that the full potential of the virtual driver system (of which PEIT is a key part) will only be reached when the system is fully predictive. In other words the system would not just react to driver error after he or she has made a mistake, but will actually be able to predict from a variety of inputs (e.g. GPS, weather and traffic conditions) the safest vehicle position, direction and speed for the road conditions at that moment. Thus not only would it help adjust engine power and braking force for maximum vehicle stability when for example a skid starts (as current systems do), but could actually take over control of the vehicle to prevent the driver error in the first place. In effect, the virtual driver!

PEIT has already led to a follow-up initiative, called SPARC, which is developing the command level of the system. SPARC will merge the data from all the various driver and vehicle systems to generate the one correct motion vector, which will then be fed to the PEIT control platform.

Contact:
Dr Ansgar Maisch
DaimlerChrysler AG
Mercedes Str. 132
D-70546 Stuttgart
Germany
Tel: +49-711-1752289
Fax: +49-711-1759911
Email: Ansgar.Maisch@DaimlerChrysler.com

Source: Based on information from PEIT

Tara Morris | IST Results
Further information:
http://istresults.cordis.lu/index.cfm?section=news&tpl=article&ID=64593

More articles from Transportation and Logistics:

nachricht Researchers 'count cars' -- literally -- to find a better way to control heavy traffic
10.08.2017 | Florida Atlantic University

nachricht From parking garage to smart multi-purpose garage
19.07.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Arbeitswirtschaft und Organisation IAO

All articles from Transportation and Logistics >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Fizzy soda water could be key to clean manufacture of flat wonder material: Graphene

Whether you call it effervescent, fizzy, or sparkling, carbonated water is making a comeback as a beverage. Aside from quenching thirst, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have discovered a new use for these "bubbly" concoctions that will have major impact on the manufacturer of the world's thinnest, flattest, and one most useful materials -- graphene.

As graphene's popularity grows as an advanced "wonder" material, the speed and quality at which it can be manufactured will be paramount. With that in mind,...

Im Focus: Exotic quantum states made from light: Physicists create optical “wells” for a super-photon

Physicists at the University of Bonn have managed to create optical hollows and more complex patterns into which the light of a Bose-Einstein condensate flows. The creation of such highly low-loss structures for light is a prerequisite for complex light circuits, such as for quantum information processing for a new generation of computers. The researchers are now presenting their results in the journal Nature Photonics.

Light particles (photons) occur as tiny, indivisible portions. Many thousands of these light portions can be merged to form a single super-photon if they are...

Im Focus: Circular RNA linked to brain function

For the first time, scientists have shown that circular RNA is linked to brain function. When a RNA molecule called Cdr1as was deleted from the genome of mice, the animals had problems filtering out unnecessary information – like patients suffering from neuropsychiatric disorders.

While hundreds of circular RNAs (circRNAs) are abundant in mammalian brains, one big question has remained unanswered: What are they actually good for? In the...

Im Focus: RAVAN CubeSat measures Earth's outgoing energy

An experimental small satellite has successfully collected and delivered data on a key measurement for predicting changes in Earth's climate.

The Radiometer Assessment using Vertically Aligned Nanotubes (RAVAN) CubeSat was launched into low-Earth orbit on Nov. 11, 2016, in order to test new...

Im Focus: Scientists shine new light on the “other high temperature superconductor”

A study led by scientists of the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) at the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science in Hamburg presents evidence of the coexistence of superconductivity and “charge-density-waves” in compounds of the poorly-studied family of bismuthates. This observation opens up new perspectives for a deeper understanding of the phenomenon of high-temperature superconductivity, a topic which is at the core of condensed matter research since more than 30 years. The paper by Nicoletti et al has been published in the PNAS.

Since the beginning of the 20th century, superconductivity had been observed in some metals at temperatures only a few degrees above the absolute zero (minus...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Call for Papers – ICNFT 2018, 5th International Conference on New Forming Technology

16.08.2017 | Event News

Sustainability is the business model of tomorrow

04.08.2017 | Event News

Clash of Realities 2017: Registration now open. International Conference at TH Köln

26.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

What the world's tiniest 'monster truck' reveals

23.08.2017 | Life Sciences

Treating arthritis with algae

23.08.2017 | Life Sciences

Witnessing turbulent motion in the atmosphere of a distant star

23.08.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>