Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Operations researchers say Delta Air Lines’ Song has cut turnaround time of aircraft by 25%

21.10.2003


ATLANTA - Song™, Delta Air Lines’ new low-fare air service, has reduced the time that arriving aircraft return to service to 45-50 minutes, significantly shorter than the industry standard, according to a paper being presented at the annual meeting of the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences (INFORMS®)



"To passengers, this means that they’ll be able to access more flights per day, so there will be greater frequency and more convenience," comments Irina Ioachim, one of the researchers. "For Delta, this means better aircraft utilization. Since the aircraft themselves are one of the airliners’ most expensive assets, this research is important to the company, too."

Irina Ioachim and Wendy Lochart of Delta Technology, Delta’s wholly owned subsidiary, are presenting a paper, "50 Minute Turn Simulation," at the annual meeting of the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences (INFORMS®), which takes place from Oct. 19 -22 at the Westin Peachtree Plaza in Atlanta. The paper will be presented on Tuesday, October 21 at 1:30 PM in Mart Room K.


The authors used operations research modeling and other techniques to arrive at their results. This type of modeling is especially difficult, says Ioachim.

"One thing we wanted to do as we developed the model was to retain a lot of flexibility, to be able to model any aspect of business process – in other words, to really be able to control what’s happening with every seat on the plane," she says. That was a very challenging task."

Joe Serratelli, Vice President at Song, says the model was important for Delta and Song.

"The aircraft turn simulation model is an incredibly effective tool that allowed us to quickly test, quantify and action a multitude of ideas and suggestions surrounding our boarding process," he says. "We were then able to quickly position live tests around elements that demonstrated high pay-back in the sim. This greatly improved our team’s effectiveness and overall ’speed-to-market.’"

Song plans further improvement to the turn process, according to the team.


Operations researchers use math and science to improve decision-making, management, and operations in a host of fields.

The INFORMS annual meeting includes sessions on topics applied to numerous fields, including air safety, the military, e-commerce, information technology, energy, transportation, marketing, telecommunications, and health care. More than 2,000 papers are scheduled to be delivered.

The General Chair of the convention is Prof. Donna Llewelyn, Georgia Institute of Technology. Additional information about the conference is at http://www.informs.org/Conf/Atlanta2003 and http://www.informs.org/Press.


The Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences (INFORMS®) is an international scientific society with 10,000 members, including Nobel Prize laureates, dedicated to applying scientific methods to help improve decision-making, management, and operations. Members of INFORMS work in business, government, and academia. They are represented in fields as diverse as airlines, health care, law enforcement, the military, the stock market, and telecommunications.

Barry List | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.informs.org
http://www.informs.org/Conf/Atlanta2003
http://www.informs.org/Press

More articles from Transportation and Logistics:

nachricht Experiments show that a few self-driving cars can dramatically improve traffic flow
10.05.2017 | University of Illinois College of Engineering

nachricht Tool helps cities to plan electric bus routes, and calculate the benefits
09.01.2017 | International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)

All articles from Transportation and Logistics >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Strathclyde-led research develops world's highest gain high-power laser amplifier

The world's highest gain high power laser amplifier - by many orders of magnitude - has been developed in research led at the University of Strathclyde.

The researchers demonstrated the feasibility of using plasma to amplify short laser pulses of picojoule-level energy up to 100 millijoules, which is a 'gain'...

Im Focus: Can the immune system be boosted against Staphylococcus aureus by delivery of messenger RNA?

Staphylococcus aureus is a feared pathogen (MRSA, multi-resistant S. aureus) due to frequent resistances against many antibiotics, especially in hospital infections. Researchers at the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut have identified immunological processes that prevent a successful immune response directed against the pathogenic agent. The delivery of bacterial proteins with RNA adjuvant or messenger RNA (mRNA) into immune cells allows the re-direction of the immune response towards an active defense against S. aureus. This could be of significant importance for the development of an effective vaccine. PLOS Pathogens has published these research results online on 25 May 2017.

Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a bacterium that colonizes by far more than half of the skin and the mucosa of adults, usually without causing infections....

Im Focus: A quantum walk of photons

Physicists from the University of Würzburg are capable of generating identical looking single light particles at the push of a button. Two new studies now demonstrate the potential this method holds.

The quantum computer has fuelled the imagination of scientists for decades: It is based on fundamentally different phenomena than a conventional computer....

Im Focus: Turmoil in sluggish electrons’ existence

An international team of physicists has monitored the scattering behaviour of electrons in a non-conducting material in real-time. Their insights could be beneficial for radiotherapy.

We can refer to electrons in non-conducting materials as ‘sluggish’. Typically, they remain fixed in a location, deep inside an atomic composite. It is hence...

Im Focus: Wafer-thin Magnetic Materials Developed for Future Quantum Technologies

Two-dimensional magnetic structures are regarded as a promising material for new types of data storage, since the magnetic properties of individual molecular building blocks can be investigated and modified. For the first time, researchers have now produced a wafer-thin ferrimagnet, in which molecules with different magnetic centers arrange themselves on a gold surface to form a checkerboard pattern. Scientists at the Swiss Nanoscience Institute at the University of Basel and the Paul Scherrer Institute published their findings in the journal Nature Communications.

Ferrimagnets are composed of two centers which are magnetized at different strengths and point in opposing directions. Two-dimensional, quasi-flat ferrimagnets...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Marine Conservation: IASS Contributes to UN Ocean Conference in New York on 5-9 June

24.05.2017 | Event News

AWK Aachen Machine Tool Colloquium 2017: Internet of Production for Agile Enterprises

23.05.2017 | Event News

Dortmund MST Conference presents Individualized Healthcare Solutions with micro and nanotechnology

22.05.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

New insights into the ancestors of all complex life

29.05.2017 | Earth Sciences

New photocatalyst speeds up the conversion of carbon dioxide into chemical resources

29.05.2017 | Life Sciences

NASA's SDO sees partial eclipse in space

29.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>