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Student-invented device eases installation of child car safety seats

19.05.2003


Low-tech ‘Main Squeeze’ compresses for snug fit inside vehicle


By turning a simple crank, a parent car uses the Main Squeeze device to ensure that a child safety seat is installed tightly against a car’s permanent seat for maximum protection.
Photo by Will Kirk



Three Johns Hopkins University undergraduates have invented a low-tech tool that makes it much easier to properly install child safety seats in automobiles, ensuring a snug fit and maximum protection for the child.

The device, dubbed "Main Squeeze," is intended to simplify the difficult task of compressing a child safety seat against a car’s permanent seat during installation. Incorrectly installed, a loose car seat can shift during an accident and leave an infant or toddler exposed to unnecessary risk of injury.


The tool was designed and assembled over the past school year by three mechanical engineering majors enrolled in the Whiting School of Engineering’s Senior Design Course. First, the tool is attached to a car’s seat belts or to part of the permanent car seat. Then the user simply turns a crank that slowly applies up to 200 pounds of compression to the base of the child seat. Main Squeeze holds the child seat in this snug position, leaving the installer free to fasten it tightly into place with the car’s seat belts or built-in LATCH (Lower Anchors and Tethers for Children) system. When this installation is completed, the Main Squeeze tool is easily removed

The student inventors -- David Apple, 21, of Herzlyia Pituach, Israel; Eric Park, 22, of Great Neck, N.Y.; and Jennifer Parker, 22, of Newburyport, Mass. -- were assigned last fall to create a device that would make it easier to install child safety seats in vehicles. The project was sponsored by the Center for Injury Research and Policy at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

"Researchers have determined that too many of these seats are installed improperly, exposing children to a greater risk of injury," said Michael Ho, a staff member at the center who monitored the project. "We asked the students to come up with a solution."

In their research, the students, all seniors, learned that snug installation of a child seat is so difficult that many parents seek help from specially trained police officers, firefighters and public safety aides. Snug installation is achieved if less than 1 inch of movement occurs on each side of the safety seat when it is severely shaken laterally by an average size adult male. When installation assistance is not available, parents are left on their own to fit the child seat securely.

"The problem is, to compress the child seat into the car you have to climb inside and apply pressure with your knees," Apple said. "That’s not always easy to do."

Added Park: "A parent or grandparent who is too tall or doesn’t weigh enough or has back problems may not be able to get a snug fit. Our goal was to come up with a lightweight, portable, relatively inexpensive tool to provide the compression that’s needed."

The students’ design is decidedly "low-tech," involving no motorized parts or electricity.

"We used a large steel acme screw, an aluminum crossbar and a padded wooden block mounted on a ball-joint," Parker said. "You put the block into the base of the child seat, attach the crossbar to the car’s seat belts or to the bottom of the permanent seat, and then simply turn the screw with a crank."

The screw applies the necessary force to get a tight seal and holds the child seat in place until it can be fastened into the car via the car’s seat belts or built-in LATCH system (required on all car models introduced after Sept. 2002). The student inventors created an assortment of attachments so that Main Squeeze can be used on a variety of newer and older model cars.

At the beginning of the school year, the students were given a budget of $8,000 to design, assemble and test their invention. Including the cost of the back half of a 1984 compact car used for testing, the students said they spent roughly half that amount to complete the Main Squeeze project. They plan to patent their prototype and look for a company interested in mass-producing the device.

The child safety seat installer was one of 11 Johns Hopkins projects completed this year by undergraduates in the Senior Design Project course. The class is taught by Andrew F. Conn, a Johns Hopkins graduate with more than 30 years of experience in public and private research and development. Each team of three or four students, working within budgets of up to $10,000, had to design a device, purchase or fabricate the parts, and assemble the final product. Corporations, government agencies and nonprofit groups provided the assignments and funding. The course is traditionally a well-received hands-on engineering experience for Johns Hopkins undergraduates.

Phil Sneiderman | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.jhu.edu/
http://www.me.jhu.edu
http://www.jhsph.edu/Research/Centers/CIRP

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