Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Technology lifts customs burden off business

18.12.2007
The line of freight trucks at the Finnish-Russian border can be over 20-km long, and a container can need over 50 different documents to reach its destination. It is essential security and taxation, but it has created an enormous burden for business. Now one EU project is recruiting technology to both improve security and reduce administration.

The ITAIDE project is tackling customs, security and administration with a broad-front approach. It is just as well because it is an enormous problem, and an intractable one. The Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) was set-up in the 1970s to create electronic documents for transport, yet 70% of documentation is on paper.

Customs has recently stepped up security which usually increases red tape and paperwork – an inherently error-prone process with names, quantities and other essential information getting mixed up. Incorrect data could even be vulnerable to a terrorist attack.

Customs and business are well aware of this administrative burden, as the EDI effort shows, but up to now attempts to solve the problem rested on replacing paper documents with electronic ones, rather than a fundamental redesign of the whole system.

ITAIDE is addressing this system redesign by tackling three fundamental aims of the e-Customs Strategy of the European Commission: creating a single customs window, establishing Authorised Economic Operators and creating interoperability across Europe.

Not reinventing the wheel
The single window means all services can be accessed through one point, electronically, with unified electronic forms to present all the information a tax service needs for tracking all types of VAT, excise or duties.

Second, once fully up and running, some businesses will be registered as ‘Authorised Economic Operators’. “This [is] for operators who have sophisticated enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems who can show they can securely track their products,” says ITAIDE’s coordinator Yao-Hua Tan of Free University Amsterdam’s Information Management Group. This makes sense because customs and businesses share a common aim: intimate knowledge of the supply chain. “If businesses share this information with the tax office, then the tax office can outsource control to the businesses,” he explains.

It means businesses essentially become their own taxman. “There’s huge advantages for both customs and businesses. Customs essentially recruit businesses into their efforts, and businesses get a green-lane treatment where they are much less checked,” notes Tan.

Trickiest of all, though, will perhaps be developing interoperability between the widely diverse business and customs computer systems around Europe. Here, ITAIDE is not reinventing the wheel. “We’re not creating a new IT platform to work across Europe, rather we’re creating a suite of redesigned tools, web services and standards to make all the different systems work together.”

It is a tough technical challenge, but with 54 months 11 partners (including such big names as SAP, Nordea and IBM) in seven countries, and a total budget of €7 million, €5.8 million of which comes from the EU, ITAIDE has the resources to do it.

Social and technical solution
They also have the right approach. ITAIDE uses a three-step methodology, called e3-Control, to design e-customs procedures. It starts with an ideal system, where everybody behaves as they should, then it analyses potential risk cases when people do not act as they should. Finally, it proposes control procedures to mitigate these risks. It is an iterative process and over time it can develop effective controls with the minimum of fuss.
Even more important, though, ITAIDE is also analysing transport from an organisational network perspective. The aim is to use technology to fit in with the real world, rather than trying to force the real world to respond to technology.

There are frequent feedback loops of the ITAIDE results with EU-DG Taxation and Customs, UN/CEFACT and the World Customs Organisation. So what will a new customs service look like?

ITAIDE is just into its second year of work, but it has already developed systems that have been piloted successfully by customs services in Britain, the Netherlands and the USA. The project set up a 'Beer Living Lab', a live, small-scale test of some of the technologies they are working on. In the test, containers were fitted with TREC, tamper-resistant embedded controllers that are electronic seals for tracking the movement and delivery of a container.

“In the past, a document would be sent from the tax office to the exporter, the exporter to transporter, transporter to importer, from the importer to its home tax office, and then back to the tax office in the exporting country to show the consignment had arrived. With TREC, all that happens automatically,” remarks Tan. ITAIDE successfully demonstrated that technology could solve the problem while enhancing security.

Christian Nielsen | alfa
Further information:
http://cordis.europa.eu/ictresults/index.cfm/section/news/tpl/article/BrowsingType/Features/ID/89064

More articles from Transportation and Logistics:

nachricht Tool helps cities to plan electric bus routes, and calculate the benefits
09.01.2017 | International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)

nachricht Realistic training for extreme flight conditions
28.12.2016 | Technical University of Munich (TUM)

All articles from Transportation and Logistics >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: A Challenging European Research Project to Develop New Tiny Microscopes

The Institute of Semiconductor Technology and the Institute of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, both members of the Laboratory for Emerging Nanometrology (LENA), at Technische Universität Braunschweig are partners in a new European research project entitled ChipScope, which aims to develop a completely new and extremely small optical microscope capable of observing the interior of living cells in real time. A consortium of 7 partners from 5 countries will tackle this issue with very ambitious objectives during a four-year research program.

To demonstrate the usefulness of this new scientific tool, at the end of the project the developed chip-sized microscope will be used to observe in real-time...

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Researchers shoot for success with simulations of laser pulse-material interactions

29.03.2017 | Materials Sciences

Igniting a solar flare in the corona with lower-atmosphere kindling

29.03.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

As sea level rises, much of Honolulu and Waikiki vulnerable to groundwater inundation

29.03.2017 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>