Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:


Motorcycle simulator gives new clues to road safety

New research using a world leading motorcycle simulator to analyse rider behaviour has proved that safer doesn’t necessarily mean slower and that formal advanced training for bikers can demonstrate improved safety on our roads.

The study was carried out by researchers at The University of Nottingham’s Centre for Motorcycle Ergonomics & Rider Human Factors. The preliminary results of the research are published today by the Institute of Advanced Motorists (IAM) which funded the research.

Motorcyclists are badly over-represented in accident statistics. As of June 2010 motorbikes made up less than four per cent of the total number of licensed vehicles on UK roads but accounted for 21 per cent of all UK road fatalities. Car drivers typically cause two out of the three most common motorcycle accidents in the UK, but a significant number of accidents are still caused by the riders themselves.

Click here for full story The aim of the research was to investigate the attitudes, behaviours and skills of different types of riders according to their level of experience and training. A unique approach was designed to find out whether or not riders with advanced training, ride differently to novice or experienced riders who don’t have an advanced qualification.

The simulator uses a Triumph Daytona 675 motorcycle mounted on a custom rig designed and built at the University. It creates a realistic, interactive, research tool using ‘STI-SIM Drive’ simulation software which projects different riding scenarios onto a large screen in front of the rider.

Three groups of riders were put through identical scenarios on the simulator as well as other tasks in the laboratory to test aspects of their hazard perception and behaviour. The findings showed that experience on its own does not make riders safer on the road and in some cases the experienced riders behaved more like the novice riders. Advanced riders used better road positioning to anticipate and respond to hazards, kept to urban speed limits, and actually made better progress through bends than riders without the formal advanced training.

Dr Alex Stedmon from the Human Factors Research Group, said: “This is one of the most in-depth studies of its kind ever conducted. It’s been a fantastic opportunity for us in the Faculty of Engineering to work alongside colleagues in the School of Psychology focusing on high impact research with a relevance to all motorcyclists. It has demonstrated clear differences between the rider groups and potential benefits to advanced training above and beyond rider experience and basic training. Whilst experience seems to help develop rider skills to an extent, advanced training appears to develop deeper levels of awareness, perception and responsibility. It also appears to make riders better urban riders and quicker, smoother and safer riders in rural settings.”

Dr David Crundall from the School of Psychology added: “This is real cutting edge research and the hazard perception results, in particular, have shown that advanced riders were quicker to identify hazards and had a greater awareness on their responsibility to themselves and other road users.”

Neil Greig, Director of Policy and Research at the Institute for Advanced Motorists, said: “We work to promote safer riding, educating riders to maintain momentum and progress where possible. So we were pleased to learn that advanced riders trained by us adopted the safest road position to deal with hazards while still managing to achieve the quickest time through bends. This research proves that the organisation’s advanced system of motorcycle training delivers real and sustainable benefits in anticipation, better road positioning and swift but safe progress in a wide range of road environments.”

A full report of the findings is due in December 2010.

Emma Rayner | EurekAlert!
Further information:

More articles from Transportation and Logistics:

nachricht Bremen University students reach the final at robotics competition with parcel delivery robot
19.10.2016 | BIBA - Bremer Institut für Produktion und Logistik

nachricht Discovering electric mobility in a playful way
18.08.2016 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Arbeitswirtschaft und Organisation IAO

All articles from Transportation and Logistics >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Etching Microstructures with Lasers

Ultrafast lasers have introduced new possibilities in engraving ultrafine structures, and scientists are now also investigating how to use them to etch microstructures into thin glass. There are possible applications in analytics (lab on a chip) and especially in electronics and the consumer sector, where great interest has been shown.

This new method was born of a surprising phenomenon: irradiating glass in a particular way with an ultrafast laser has the effect of making the glass up to a...

Im Focus: Light-driven atomic rotations excite magnetic waves

Terahertz excitation of selected crystal vibrations leads to an effective magnetic field that drives coherent spin motion

Controlling functional properties by light is one of the grand goals in modern condensed matter physics and materials science. A new study now demonstrates how...

Im Focus: New 3-D wiring technique brings scalable quantum computers closer to reality

Researchers from the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) at the University of Waterloo led the development of a new extensible wiring technique capable of controlling superconducting quantum bits, representing a significant step towards to the realization of a scalable quantum computer.

"The quantum socket is a wiring method that uses three-dimensional wires based on spring-loaded pins to address individual qubits," said Jeremy Béjanin, a PhD...

Im Focus: Scientists develop a semiconductor nanocomposite material that moves in response to light

In a paper in Scientific Reports, a research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute describes a novel light-activated phenomenon that could become the basis for applications as diverse as microscopic robotic grippers and more efficient solar cells.

A research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) has developed a revolutionary, light-activated semiconductor nanocomposite material that can be used...

Im Focus: Diamonds aren't forever: Sandia, Harvard team create first quantum computer bridge

By forcefully embedding two silicon atoms in a diamond matrix, Sandia researchers have demonstrated for the first time on a single chip all the components needed to create a quantum bridge to link quantum computers together.

"People have already built small quantum computers," says Sandia researcher Ryan Camacho. "Maybe the first useful one won't be a single giant quantum computer...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>



Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

Agricultural Trade Developments and Potentials in Central Asia and the South Caucasus

14.10.2016 | Event News

World Health Summit – Day Three: A Call to Action

12.10.2016 | Event News

Latest News

Greater Range and Longer Lifetime

26.10.2016 | Power and Electrical Engineering

VDI presents International Bionic Award of the Schauenburg Foundation

26.10.2016 | Awards Funding

3-D-printed magnets

26.10.2016 | Power and Electrical Engineering

More VideoLinks >>>