Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Listening Technology for Wheelsets for Safer Trains

05.11.2012
With RailBAM, Siemens is providing an acoustic monitoring system that detects damage to the wheelset bearings in trains at an early stage.

This solution improves the reliability of rail transport and reduces maintenance costs. As reported in the current issue of Pictures of the Future, the system registers the running sounds of wheelset bearings in trains that are under way.



For more than two years, RailBAM has been monitoring 45 trains with a total of 9,000 wheelsets in Southampton, UK. Normally, wheelsets are replaced every 1.2 million kilometers. Because RailBAM can detect damage long before an actual failure occurs, technicians can now replace wheelsets whenever the measurement data shows the first changes.

As a result, it has been possible to extend the maintenance intervals for powered and non-powered wheelsets by ten and 50 percent, respectively. RailBAM was developed by Track IQ, a Siemens partner, and is marketed exclusively by Siemens.

Wheelsets experience more operational stress than any other train component. Wind and weather, high speeds and vibration make them susceptible to wear and contamination from dirt. At the same time, damage to a wheelset is a serious risk to safety, because if a wheel fails it is likely that the train will derail. Wheelsets are therefore regularly subject to visual inspection and ultrasound examination and after a set number of kilometers they are replaced.

RailBAM now makes it possible to regularly monitor the wheelset bearings of trains in service. The system is based on an acoustic sensor that is mounted along the rails and continuously records the running sounds of all trains. At the depot, measurement data is collected and assigned to a specific train based on the railroad's timetable. Software extracts the measurement values for the wheelsets from the acoustical data and compares them to reference values.

Early stages of damage to bearings cause characteristic changes in the running sounds of the wheels. If such alterations appear, the effected wheelset will be replaced the next time the train returns to a depot. In this way, sudden failure can be prevented. Conversely, a wheelset is allowed to remain in service beyond its normal maintenance interval, as long as the monitoring data doesn't show any problems that require attention.

At the moment, RailBAM can be used to monitor trains traveling at speeds up to a maximum of 160 kilometer per hour. However, due to the high level of interest from various rail operators, there are plans to adapt the system so that it can also operate with high-speed trains.

Dr. Norbert Aschenbrenner | Siemens InnovationNews
Further information:
http://www.siemens.com/innovationnews

All articles from Transportation and Logistics >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Self-assembling nano inks form conductive and transparent grids during imprint

Transparent electronics devices are present in today’s thin film displays, solar cells, and touchscreens. The future will bring flexible versions of such devices. Their production requires printable materials that are transparent and remain highly conductive even when deformed. Researchers at INM – Leibniz Institute for New Materials have combined a new self-assembling nano ink with an imprint process to create flexible conductive grids with a resolution below one micrometer.

To print the grids, an ink of gold nanowires is applied to a substrate. A structured stamp is pressed on the substrate and forces the ink into a pattern. “The...

Im Focus: The Glowing Brain

A new Fraunhofer MEVIS method conveys medical interrelationships quickly and intuitively with innovative visualization technology

On the monitor, a brain spins slowly and can be examined from every angle. Suddenly, some sections start glowing, first on the side and then the entire back of...

Im Focus: Newly discovered material property may lead to high temp superconductivity

Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Ames Laboratory have discovered an unusual property of purple bronze that may point to new ways to achieve high temperature superconductivity.

While studying purple bronze, a molybdenum oxide, researchers discovered an unconventional charge density wave on its surface.

Im Focus: Mapping electromagnetic waveforms

Munich Physicists have developed a novel electron microscope that can visualize electromagnetic fields oscillating at frequencies of billions of cycles per second.

Temporally varying electromagnetic fields are the driving force behind the whole of electronics. Their polarities can change at mind-bogglingly fast rates, and...

Im Focus: Continental tug-of-war - until the rope snaps

Breakup of continents with two speed: Continents initially stretch very slowly along the future splitting zone, but then move apart very quickly before the onset of rupture. The final speed can be up to 20 times faster than in the first, slow extension phase.phases

Present-day continents were shaped hundreds of millions of years ago as the supercontinent Pangaea broke apart. Derived from Pangaea’s main fragments Gondwana...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

GROWING IN CITIES - Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Urban Gardening

15.07.2016 | Event News

SIGGRAPH2016 Computer Graphics Interactive Techniques, 24-28 July, Anaheim, California

15.07.2016 | Event News

Partner countries of FAIR accelerator meet in Darmstadt and approve developments

11.07.2016 | Event News

 
Latest News

World first demo of labyrinth magnetic-domain-optical Q-switched laser

28.07.2016 | Information Technology

New material could advance superconductivity

28.07.2016 | Materials Sciences

CO2 can be stored underground for 10 times the length needed to avoid climatic impact

28.07.2016 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>