Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Green wave in Muenster: Adaptive signal control from Siemens offers car drivers a 30 percent improvement in flow of traffic

30.03.2009
One of Siemens Mobility’s central themes at the UITP exhibition in Vienna will be solutions for road traffic.

Representative of these solutions will be the “green wave for Muenster”, where road users benefit from a succession of green lights more frequently thanks to the Sitraffic Motion adaptive network control system.

Since the middle of last year, the new procedure analyzes the current traffic situation on a main artery and then automatically optimizes the red-green phases of the traffic signals at the 24 intersections on this road. The result is an average 30 percent reduction of driver waiting times at traffic lights.

This figure was corroborated by a study done by Ruhr-Universität Bochum and published at the beginning of 2009. Fuel consumption and exhaust emissions are reduced as well. These results certainly convinced the people of Muenster, and the city council has decided to link up a second main traffic artery to the Sitraffic Motion system in the near future.

Starting in 2006, Siemens installed the Sitraffic Motion traffic control system at 24 traffic signal-controlled intersections on the heavily traveled Albersloher Weg in Muenster. This was done in connection with a new traffic computer system. By means of detectors mounted in the approach roads, Sitraffic Motion determines how many vehicles are underway, where they turn off and where there is an imminent threat of congestion.

A central traffic computer receives the data, analyzes the traffic situation at the intersections along the six-kilometer-long road in 15 to 20 minute cycles and automatically adapts the lengths of the red-green phases of the traffic signals as well as the green wave accordingly. In June 2008, installation on the road used as a model was completed. The result: traffic flows more smoothly, there are fewer stops, and waiting times for car drivers are shorter. Fuel consumption and exhaust emissions are also reduced as a consequence.

The success of the new method has been confirmed by a representative study carried out by Ruhr-Universität Bochum. The study compared the three development stages of the traffic system in use on Albersloher Weg: the original situation with fixed time control, the conventionally planned, traffic-dependent control unit in the individual traffic signal installations and, finally, the Siemens approach in the form of the traffic-adaptive control system, also referred to as a model-based system. The team surrounding Prof. Werner Brilon at the university’s Institute for Transportation and Traffic Engineering used values from their own measurements with detectors, GPS (Global Positioning System) and video vehicles as well as the telematics data of the city’s public transit system.

“The level of improvement has been unexpectedly high,” summarized the authors of the study, who went on to say that the adaptive control system brought about a further improvement in traffic quality compared to a traffic-dependent control method.

In view of the excellent success achieved in Albersloher Weg, the Muenster city council decided to equip another busy road with the new control system from Siemens in a subsequent construction phase.

You can download the study at the following link (available in German only):

http://www.muenster.de/stadt/stadtplanung/pdf/albersloher-weg_lsa_bericht2009-01.pdf

The Siemens Industry Sector (Erlangen, Germany) is the worldwide leading supplier of production, transportation, building and lighting technologies. With integrated automation technologies as well as comprehensive industry-specific solutions, Siemens increases the productivity, efficiency and flexibility of its customers in the fields of industry and infrastructure. The Industry Sector consists of six Divisions: Building Technologies, Drive Technologies, Industry Automation, Industry Solutions, Mobility and Osram. With around 222,000 employees worldwide, Siemens Industry posted a profit of EUR 3.86 billion with revenues totaling EUR 38 billion in fiscal year 2008 (ended September 30).

The Mobility Division (Erlangen, Germany) is the internationally leading provider of transportation and logistics solutions. With its "Complete mobility" approach, the Division is focused on networking the various modes of transportation in order to ensure the efficient transport of people and goods. “Complete mobility” combines the company's competence in operations control systems for railways and traffic control systems for roadways together with solutions for airport logistics, postal automation, traction power supplies and rolling stock for mass transit, regional and mainline services, turnkey systems as well as forward-looking service concepts.

Siemens AG
Corporate Communications and Government Affairs Wittelsbacherplatz 2,
80333 Munich
Germany
Reference number: IMO200903.025 e fp

Anja Uhlendorff | Siemens Industry Sector
Further information:
http://www.siemens.com/industry
http://www.siemens.com/mobility

More articles from Transportation and Logistics:

nachricht Experiments show that a few self-driving cars can dramatically improve traffic flow
10.05.2017 | University of Illinois College of Engineering

nachricht Tool helps cities to plan electric bus routes, and calculate the benefits
09.01.2017 | International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)

All articles from Transportation and Logistics >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Strathclyde-led research develops world's highest gain high-power laser amplifier

The world's highest gain high power laser amplifier - by many orders of magnitude - has been developed in research led at the University of Strathclyde.

The researchers demonstrated the feasibility of using plasma to amplify short laser pulses of picojoule-level energy up to 100 millijoules, which is a 'gain'...

Im Focus: Can the immune system be boosted against Staphylococcus aureus by delivery of messenger RNA?

Staphylococcus aureus is a feared pathogen (MRSA, multi-resistant S. aureus) due to frequent resistances against many antibiotics, especially in hospital infections. Researchers at the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut have identified immunological processes that prevent a successful immune response directed against the pathogenic agent. The delivery of bacterial proteins with RNA adjuvant or messenger RNA (mRNA) into immune cells allows the re-direction of the immune response towards an active defense against S. aureus. This could be of significant importance for the development of an effective vaccine. PLOS Pathogens has published these research results online on 25 May 2017.

Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a bacterium that colonizes by far more than half of the skin and the mucosa of adults, usually without causing infections....

Im Focus: A quantum walk of photons

Physicists from the University of Würzburg are capable of generating identical looking single light particles at the push of a button. Two new studies now demonstrate the potential this method holds.

The quantum computer has fuelled the imagination of scientists for decades: It is based on fundamentally different phenomena than a conventional computer....

Im Focus: Turmoil in sluggish electrons’ existence

An international team of physicists has monitored the scattering behaviour of electrons in a non-conducting material in real-time. Their insights could be beneficial for radiotherapy.

We can refer to electrons in non-conducting materials as ‘sluggish’. Typically, they remain fixed in a location, deep inside an atomic composite. It is hence...

Im Focus: Wafer-thin Magnetic Materials Developed for Future Quantum Technologies

Two-dimensional magnetic structures are regarded as a promising material for new types of data storage, since the magnetic properties of individual molecular building blocks can be investigated and modified. For the first time, researchers have now produced a wafer-thin ferrimagnet, in which molecules with different magnetic centers arrange themselves on a gold surface to form a checkerboard pattern. Scientists at the Swiss Nanoscience Institute at the University of Basel and the Paul Scherrer Institute published their findings in the journal Nature Communications.

Ferrimagnets are composed of two centers which are magnetized at different strengths and point in opposing directions. Two-dimensional, quasi-flat ferrimagnets...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Marine Conservation: IASS Contributes to UN Ocean Conference in New York on 5-9 June

24.05.2017 | Event News

AWK Aachen Machine Tool Colloquium 2017: Internet of Production for Agile Enterprises

23.05.2017 | Event News

Dortmund MST Conference presents Individualized Healthcare Solutions with micro and nanotechnology

22.05.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

New photocatalyst speeds up the conversion of carbon dioxide into chemical resources

29.05.2017 | Life Sciences

NASA's SDO sees partial eclipse in space

29.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

New drug reduces transplant and mortality rates significantly in patients with hepatitis C

29.05.2017 | Statistics

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>