Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Ecoluminance: LRC Develops New Method to Light Roundabouts

27.11.2012
Roundabouts, also known as traffic circles, are increasing in number across the U.S. These intersections generally increase traffic throughput while reducing the severity of automobile accidents.

However, as relatively new traffic features, modern roundabouts are sometimes described as confusing for drivers. One difference between roundabouts and conventional cross-type intersections is the location of pedestrian crosswalks.

Drivers may be less familiar with the location of crosswalks when driving through a roundabout. The Lighting Research Center (LRC) at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute has developed a concept for roadway illumination called "Ecoluminance" which incorporates roadside vegetation with low-level pedestrian and landscape lighting, retroreflective markers, and light-emitting diode (LED) road and walkway illumination.

In a study sponsored jointly by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) and by the New York State Department of Transportation (NYSDOT), the LRC designed, installed and evaluated new lighting approaches in real-world conditions. Senior Research Scientist John Bullough and LRC Director Mark Rea were the principal investigators for the study.

“Ecoluminance uses a combination of lighting and vegetation to provide visual delineation, illumination for important safety hazards and concerns, and cues about road geometry,” said Bullough.

The ecoluminance concept was implemented at a roundabout in the Town of Bethlehem in Albany County, New York with cooperation from the Town Board and the Public Works, Highway, Planning, and Police Departments. Researchers from the State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry also assisted with the study, and companies General Electric Lighting, Forms + Surfaces and Lightspec Albany donated luminaires to the project.

During two preliminary demonstrations during the summer of 2011, the LRC installed lights and vegetation and obtained feedback from NYSERDA and NYSDOT engineers as well as from town officials and the Town of Bethlehem Bicycle and Pedestrian Committee. Based on this feedback, the LRC installed vegetation and retroreflective markers in the central island of the roundabout, LED landscape lighting to illuminate vegetation and trees, bollards at crosswalks, and LED overhead lighting along sidewalks and the road during the summer of 2012. Roadway edges and pedestrians were more visible than under the conventional lighting, and vehicles approached the roundabout with similar or slightly lower speeds.

Traditional lighting for roundabouts consists of a relatively large number of pole-mounted overhead luminaires, which are relatively expensive to operate because they are energy intensive. The LRC estimates that the initial cost of the ecoluminance system is similar to that of conventional lighting, but the energy use is only about a fourth, resulting in substantially lower energy costs as well as substantially lower light pollution impacts. "The ecoluminance concept could allow transportation agencies to integrate vegetation and lighting while reducing costs and environmental impacts," said Rea.

The LRC's report is available online at: https://www.dot.ny.gov/divisions/engineering/

technical-services/trans-r-and-d-repository/C-08-03FinalReport-Project18233-C0803.pdf

For more information, please visit the LRC website at http://www.lrc.rpi.edu/.

Contact:
Rebekah Mullaney
Lighting Research Center
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Troy, NY
518-687-7118
mullar2@rpi.edu

Rebekah Mullaney | Newswise Science News
Further information:
http://www.rpi.edu

More articles from Transportation and Logistics:

nachricht Tool helps cities to plan electric bus routes, and calculate the benefits
09.01.2017 | International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)

nachricht Realistic training for extreme flight conditions
28.12.2016 | Technical University of Munich (TUM)

All articles from Transportation and Logistics >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: A Challenging European Research Project to Develop New Tiny Microscopes

The Institute of Semiconductor Technology and the Institute of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, both members of the Laboratory for Emerging Nanometrology (LENA), at Technische Universität Braunschweig are partners in a new European research project entitled ChipScope, which aims to develop a completely new and extremely small optical microscope capable of observing the interior of living cells in real time. A consortium of 7 partners from 5 countries will tackle this issue with very ambitious objectives during a four-year research program.

To demonstrate the usefulness of this new scientific tool, at the end of the project the developed chip-sized microscope will be used to observe in real-time...

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Researchers shoot for success with simulations of laser pulse-material interactions

29.03.2017 | Materials Sciences

Igniting a solar flare in the corona with lower-atmosphere kindling

29.03.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

As sea level rises, much of Honolulu and Waikiki vulnerable to groundwater inundation

29.03.2017 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>