Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

First automatic driving in real city traffic world wide

08.10.2010
Research vehicle „Leonie“ drives automatically on the Braunschweig inner ring road

A world’s first in Braunschweig: For the first time, an automatic vehicle is driving in everyday city traffic today.


Leonie in front of the TU Braunschweig main building. TU Braunschweig

In the context of the research project “Stadtpilot”, the Technische Universität Braunschweig has developed a research vehicle in its competence centre Niedersächsisches Forschungszentrum Fahrzeugtechnik: it drives automatically along a given route in normal traffic.

On Braunschweig’s two-lane ring road, the research vehicle “Leonie” is able to conduct challenging driving maneuvers at speeds up to 60 km/h: lane keeping, behavior at intersections, avoiding obstacles, and adjusting distances and speeds to the flowing traffic. The route includes part of the Braunschweig ring road from Hans-Sommer-Straße to the intersection Hamburger Straße, and back. A safety driver ready to intervene in emergencies is compulsory.

Research project “Stadtpilot”

The research project „Stadtpilot“ is the only research project worldwide so far that realizes automatic driving in real city traffic. Already in 2007, the TU Braunschweig participated successfully in the DARPA Urban Challenge, the worldwide leading competition for autonomous vehicles: with the 2006 VW Passat Variant “Caroline”, the team CarOLO was in the finals as one of 11 teams out of the initial 89. Based on these experiences, an interdisciplinary team from three different faculties has now developed the follow-up “Leonie”.

“We have come a long way, from our first vehicle Caroline to Leonie”, Professor Markus Maurer explained. “Whereas, in the competition, we drove in a controlled scenario, it is now necessary to master the real traffic volume. Leonie is confronted by various traffic participants who drive differently, and sometimes even against the rules. It has to adjust its speed to the flowing traffic. And last not least, a substantial safety concept is necessary.”

“To drive autonomously Leonie has to know not only the traffic rules. We teach it all a human also needs to drive. It has to know its own position (through satellite positioning), ‘see’ its environment, evaluate speeds and obstacles (with its sensor concept), assess difficult traffic situations, and recognize dangers in advance. In addition, it must learn to get along with various human drivers in other vehicles”, says project leader Jörn Marten Wille.

It is the goal of the project “Stadtpilot” to drive autonomously around the Braunschweig inner ring road. The extremely complex environment makes the project challenging: the dense traffic on the two lane road is highly demanding for the environment perception; the narrow roads require precise lane planning; and the dense urban built-up area makes the exact positioning difficult.

“Stadtpilot” has been developed mainly at the Mobile Life Campus, the Wolfsburg location of the Niedersächsisches Forschungszentrum Fahrzeugtechnik (NFF). Experts from Control Engineering (Electrical Engineering), Flight Guidance (Mechanical Engineering) of the Technische Universität Braunschweig, as well as the Institute of Transportation Systems of the German Aerospace Center, and the University of Hildesheim. have been contributing to the project. The NFF having research in new concepts for a sustainable automotive mobility as main objective sees the project “Stadtpilot” as an essential research project. It is based at the NFF location in Wolfsburg.

Research vehicle „Leonie“

Leonie is a VW Passat station wagon, 2.0 TDI. With satellite positioning the vehicle can calculate its position in the traffic. Thanks to various laser scanners and radar sensors, Leonie can perceive its environment continuously and process the data.

The State of Lower Saxony has granted an exceptional permission for driving in real traffic (on the Braunschweig ring road). It is based on the expert opinion of the TÜV Nord Mobilität. A safety driver is compulsory. Another driver inputs the data of the traffic signals which are not yet recognized by Leonie.

Since the beginning of this year already, the team of the Stadtpilot project has conducted driving tests on the compound of the former Heinrich-der-Löwe-Kaserne in Braunschweig-Rautheim. Besides Leonie, a second research vehicle, Henry, is being built up within the NFF research field “Intelligent Vehicle”. Henry is not yet ready to drive, though.

Contact:

Prof. Markus Maurer
Dipl.-Ing. Jörn Marten Wille
TU Braunschweig
Institut für Regelungstechnik
Lehrstuhl für elektronische Fahrzeugsysteme
Hans-Sommer-Str. 66
D-38106 Braunschweig
Tel.: +49-531-391-63060
E-Mail: maurer@ifr.ing.tu-bs.de
wille@ifr.ing.tu-bs.de
Contact for the media:
Dr. Elisabeth Hoffmann
Leiterin Presse und Kommunikation
Technische Universität Braunschweig
Pockelsstr. 14, 38106 Braunschweig
Tel.: +49 531 391-4122
e.hoffmann@tu-braunschweig.de
presse@tu-braunschweig.de
www.tu-braunschweig.de/presse

Dr. Elisabeth Hoffmann | idw
Further information:
http://stadtpilot.tu-bs.de
http://www.dlr.de/desktopdefault.aspx/tabid-6216

More articles from Transportation and Logistics:

nachricht Study sets new distance record for medical drone transport
13.09.2017 | Johns Hopkins Medicine

nachricht Researchers 'count cars' -- literally -- to find a better way to control heavy traffic
10.08.2017 | Florida Atlantic University

All articles from Transportation and Logistics >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Salmonella as a tumour medication

HZI researchers developed a bacterial strain that can be used in cancer therapy

Salmonellae are dangerous pathogens that enter the body via contaminated food and can cause severe infections. But these bacteria are also known to target...

Im Focus: Neutron star merger directly observed for the first time

University of Maryland researchers contribute to historic detection of gravitational waves and light created by event

On August 17, 2017, at 12:41:04 UTC, scientists made the first direct observation of a merger between two neutron stars--the dense, collapsed cores that remain...

Im Focus: Breaking: the first light from two neutron stars merging

Seven new papers describe the first-ever detection of light from a gravitational wave source. The event, caused by two neutron stars colliding and merging together, was dubbed GW170817 because it sent ripples through space-time that reached Earth on 2017 August 17. Around the world, hundreds of excited astronomers mobilized quickly and were able to observe the event using numerous telescopes, providing a wealth of new data.

Previous detections of gravitational waves have all involved the merger of two black holes, a feat that won the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics earlier this month....

Im Focus: Smart sensors for efficient processes

Material defects in end products can quickly result in failures in many areas of industry, and have a massive impact on the safe use of their products. This is why, in the field of quality assurance, intelligent, nondestructive sensor systems play a key role. They allow testing components and parts in a rapid and cost-efficient manner without destroying the actual product or changing its surface. Experts from the Fraunhofer IZFP in Saarbrücken will be presenting two exhibits at the Blechexpo in Stuttgart from 7–10 November 2017 that allow fast, reliable, and automated characterization of materials and detection of defects (Hall 5, Booth 5306).

When quality testing uses time-consuming destructive test methods, it can result in enormous costs due to damaging or destroying the products. And given that...

Im Focus: Cold molecules on collision course

Using a new cooling technique MPQ scientists succeed at observing collisions in a dense beam of cold and slow dipolar molecules.

How do chemical reactions proceed at extremely low temperatures? The answer requires the investigation of molecular samples that are cold, dense, and slow at...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

3rd Symposium on Driving Simulation

23.10.2017 | Event News

ASEAN Member States discuss the future role of renewable energy

17.10.2017 | Event News

World Health Summit 2017: International experts set the course for the future of Global Health

10.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Microfluidics probe 'cholesterol' of the oil industry

23.10.2017 | Life Sciences

Gamma rays will reach beyond the limits of light

23.10.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

The end of pneumonia? New vaccine offers hope

23.10.2017 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>