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New York University scientists discover possible treatment to reduce scarring

09.07.2012
New research in the FASEB Journal suggests that topical application of an adenosine A2A receptor antagonist will diminish the overall size of a scar and improve the quality of skin within the scar

Whether from surgery or battle wounds, ugly scars can affect body and mind. Now a new research report appearing online in the FASEB Journal offers a new strategy to reduce or eliminate scars on the skin.

Specifically, scientists from NYU describe how agents that block receptors for adenosine (a molecule generated from ATP which is used by the body to provide energy to muscles) can be applied topically to healing wounds to reduce scar size, yielding skin that feels more like the original, unscarred skin.

"Scars can be disfiguring and, if extensive enough, can lead to diminished function and quality of life," said Bruce N. Cronstein, M.D., a researcher involved in the work from the Division of Translational Medicine in the Department of Medicine at New York University School of Medicine in New York, NY. "We hope that our findings may lead to new agents that diminish scarring and disfigurement following burns, wounds, or even illnesses that destroy skin and lead to a better quality of life for victims of these traumas."

When the skin or other tissues are wounded, ATP leaks from the damaged cells and is then converted to adenosine which promotes healing. Scars form when adenosine continues to be produced at the wound site after the injury is healed, leading to larger, thicker scars than what may have otherwise been there. To study the possibility of reducing scar sizes, Cronstein and colleagues studied wounds on the backs of mice. After the wound closed, the adenosine A2A receptor antagonist was applied. They found that the adenosine A2A receptor agonist prevented excessive scar tissue in the treated mice.

"The vast majority of scars are hardly noticeable, if they can be seen at all," said Gerald Weissmann, M.D., Editor-in-Chief of the FASEB Journal, "but for some, scars can severely disfigure not only the body, but the mind. Finding ways to prevent scarring after wounds or surgery has the potential to improve the quality of life for those who suffer the slings and arrows of outrageous fortune, now and for generations to come."

Receive monthly highlights from the FASEB Journal by e-mail. Sign up at http://www.faseb.org/fjupdate.aspx. The FASEB Journal is published by the Federation of the American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB) and is among the most cited biology journals worldwide according to the Institute for Scientific Information. In 2010, the journal was recognized by the Special Libraries Association as one of the top 100 most influential biomedical journals of the past century. FASEB is composed of 26 societies with more than 100,000 members, making it the largest coalition of biomedical research associations in the United States. Celebrating 100 Years of Advancing the Life Sciences in 2012, FASEB is rededicating its efforts to advance health and well-being by promoting progress and education in biological and biomedical sciences through service to our member societies and collaborative advocacy.

Details: Miguel Perez-Aso, Luis Chiriboga, and Bruce N. Cronstein. Pharmacological blockade of adenosine A2A receptors diminishes scarring. FASEB J doi:10.1096/fj.12-209627 ; http://www.fasebj.org/content/early/2012/07/05/fj.12-209627.abstract

Cody Mooneyhan | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.faseb.org

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