Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

XMRV and related viruses not confirmed in blood of healthy donors or chronic fatigue syndrome patients

23.09.2011
HHS-funded research was part of efforts to determine whether these viruses could affect safety of blood supply

A study supported by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services could not validate or confirm previous research findings that suggested the presence of one of several viruses in blood samples of people living with chronic fatigue syndrome. The new study also could not find the viruses in blood samples of healthy donors who were previously known to not have the viruses.

The HHS-supported study examined the validity of testing techniques intended to detect the presence of several viruses, xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) or related polytropic murine leukemia viruses (P-MLVs). Such follow-up studies are standard in science to determine whether earlier findings are accurate. The new findings suggest earlier results may have resulted from laboratory error, either contamination or false positive test results.

The initial reports of a link between XMRV and chronic fatigue syndrome prompted HHS to investigate how well tests detect XMRV/P-MLVs, and the prevalence and potential transmission of these viruses in the blood supply. If the viruses had been proven to be present in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome or healthy donors, concerns were raised that these viruses could put the blood supply at risk. The new results were published online on Thursday, Sept. 22, 2011 in Science Express.

“The results of this study, along with other recent findings, reassure us that these viruses do not pose a threat to the safety of the nation’s blood supply,” said Susan B. Shurin, M.D., acting director of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) of the National Institutes of Health. “These data add to the mounting evidence that there is no need to screen blood donors for them at the present time.”

In the new study, blood samples were taken from healthy donors and from 14 patients with chronic fatigue syndrome who had previously tested positive for XMRV or P-MLV, and samples from another person who had tested positive for XMRV but who did not have chronic fatigue syndrome. The study also used blood samples from healthy volunteers whose blood tests previously had shown no signs of XMRV/P-MLV.

The samples were blinded with no indication as to their source, and sent to nine laboratories. The study involved laboratories supported by several HHS agencies along with Abbott Laboratories, Abbott Park, Ill., GenProbe Inc., San Diego, and the Whittemore Peterson Institute (WPI), Reno, Nev.

The nine laboratories tested identical sets of the new blood samples for the XMRV/P-MLV nucleic acid, for replication of the virus (whether it reproduced itself in cells), and for antibodies to the viruses. Two labs, which previously had reported the association of XMRV with chronic fatigue syndrome, reported the presence of XMRV for some samples. However, the labs reported similar rates of finding XMRV in samples from patients with chronic fatigue syndrome and from healthy donors who were known to not have XMRV. Additional tests run in the same and other laboratories on the same samples did not find XMRV, strongly suggesting that these persons were negative for XMRV/ P-MLVs. This would be a sign that the few observed positive results represented false positives — that is, the results indicated the condition was present when it actually was not.

To investigate the validity of testing techniques and to determine XMRV’s potential impact on the blood supply, HHS formed the Blood XMRV Scientific Research Working Group in December 2009. The NHLBI leads the working group, which includes other HHS agencies including the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health, NIH’s National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the NIH Clinical Center, as well as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Food and Drug Administration. The current study is based on the working group’s efforts to determine the best way to test blood samples for the virus.

Researchers used 11 nucleic acid, five antibody, and three culture assays to determine the assays’ abilities to detect XMRV/P-MLVs. The study also checked for evidence of contamination with mouse DNA, because XMRV or its predecessors may be present in some mouse strains and cell lines.

In 2009, WPI researchers had reported a possible link between XMRV and chronic fatigue syndrome. In June 2010, the AABB, a nonprofit U.S. blood banking association, recommended that collection centers discourage people with chronic fatigue syndrome from donating blood.

However, within the last year, evidence emerged suggesting that contamination in the laboratory was potentially responsible for detection of XMRV in some blood samples from patients with chronic fatigue syndrome. To ensure that this did not compromise results in the new study, extensive efforts were undertaken to avoid laboratory contamination and contamination of samples.

The Blood Systems Research Institute, San Francisco, including Graham Simmons, Ph. D., the paper’s lead author, compiled the blood samples and distributed them to participating laboratories. The following labs and investigators were responsible for testing the sample panels:

Abbott (Two labs: Molecular Laboratory and Diagnostic Laboratory) — John Hackett Jr., Ning Tang
CDC — William M. Switzer, Walid Heneine
FDA — Indira K. Hewlett, Jiangqin Zhao
FDA — Shyh-Ching Lo/ Harvey Alter, NIH Clinical Center, Bethesda, Md.
Gen-Probe, Inc. — Jeffrey M. Linnen, Kui Gao
NCI — Mary F. Kearney/John M. Coffin, Tufts University, Boston
NCI — Francis W. Ruscetti
WPI — Judy A. Mikovits, Max A. Pfost
W. Ian Lipkin, M.D., of Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health, is currently leading a separate study that is testing fresh blood samples from 150 people living with chronic fatigue syndrome and 150 similar but healthy people. Through this effort, organizers will process, blind, and send samples to laboratories at the FDA, the CDC, and the WPI for testing for the presence of XMRV, MLV or related viruses.

If one of the participating laboratories finds that a sample is virus positive, further tests will be conducted to determine the validity of the result. If one participating laboratory finds a positive sample but another laboratory does not, the same samples can be shipped again, with a new blinded code, to be retested. It is hoped that the results from this study will be available by the end of 2011.

For more information or to schedule an interview with an NHLBI expert, contact the NHLBI Office of Communications at 301-496-4236 or nhlbi_news@nhlbi.nih.gov. To interview an NCI expert, contact NCI Office of Media Relations at 301-496-6641 or ncipressofficers@mail.nih.gov.

Part of the National Institutes of Health, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) plans, conducts, and supports research related to the causes, prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of heart, blood vessel, lung, and blood diseases; and sleep disorders. The Institute also administers national health education campaigns on women and heart disease, healthy weight for children, and other topics. NHLBI press releases and other materials are available online at www.nhlbi.nih.gov.

NCI leads the National Cancer Program and the NIH effort to dramatically reduce the burden of cancer and improve the lives of cancer patients and their families, through research into prevention and cancer biology, the development of new interventions, and the training and mentoring of new researchers. For more information about cancer, please visit the NCI Web site at www.cancer.gov or call NCI's Cancer Information Service at 1-800-4-CANCER (1-800-422-6237).

About the National Institutes of Health (NIH): NIH, the nation's medical research agency, includes 27 Institutes and Centers and is a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. NIH is the primary federal agency conducting and supporting basic, clinical, and translational medical research, and is investigating the causes, treatments, and cures for both common and rare diseases. For more information about NIH and its programs, visit www.nih.gov.

NHLBI Communications Office | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.nih.gov

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Multi-institutional collaboration uncovers how molecular machines assemble
02.12.2016 | Salk Institute

nachricht Fertilized egg cells trigger and monitor loss of sperm’s epigenetic memory
02.12.2016 | IMBA - Institut für Molekulare Biotechnologie der Österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften GmbH

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Novel silicon etching technique crafts 3-D gradient refractive index micro-optics

A multi-institutional research collaboration has created a novel approach for fabricating three-dimensional micro-optics through the shape-defined formation of porous silicon (PSi), with broad impacts in integrated optoelectronics, imaging, and photovoltaics.

Working with colleagues at Stanford and The Dow Chemical Company, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign fabricated 3-D birefringent...

Im Focus: Quantum Particles Form Droplets

In experiments with magnetic atoms conducted at extremely low temperatures, scientists have demonstrated a unique phase of matter: The atoms form a new type of quantum liquid or quantum droplet state. These so called quantum droplets may preserve their form in absence of external confinement because of quantum effects. The joint team of experimental physicists from Innsbruck and theoretical physicists from Hannover report on their findings in the journal Physical Review X.

“Our Quantum droplets are in the gas phase but they still drop like a rock,” explains experimental physicist Francesca Ferlaino when talking about the...

Im Focus: MADMAX: Max Planck Institute for Physics takes up axion research

The Max Planck Institute for Physics (MPP) is opening up a new research field. A workshop from November 21 - 22, 2016 will mark the start of activities for an innovative axion experiment. Axions are still only purely hypothetical particles. Their detection could solve two fundamental problems in particle physics: What dark matter consists of and why it has not yet been possible to directly observe a CP violation for the strong interaction.

The “MADMAX” project is the MPP’s commitment to axion research. Axions are so far only a theoretical prediction and are difficult to detect: on the one hand,...

Im Focus: Molecules change shape when wet

Broadband rotational spectroscopy unravels structural reshaping of isolated molecules in the gas phase to accommodate water

In two recent publications in the Journal of Chemical Physics and in the Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters, researchers around Melanie Schnell from the Max...

Im Focus: Fraunhofer ISE Develops Highly Compact, High Frequency DC/DC Converter for Aviation

The efficiency of power electronic systems is not solely dependent on electrical efficiency but also on weight, for example, in mobile systems. When the weight of relevant components and devices in airplanes, for instance, is reduced, fuel savings can be achieved and correspondingly greenhouse gas emissions decreased. New materials and components based on gallium nitride (GaN) can help to reduce weight and increase the efficiency. With these new materials, power electronic switches can be operated at higher switching frequency, resulting in higher power density and lower material costs.

Researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE together with partners have investigated how these materials can be used to make power...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ICTM Conference 2017: Production technology for turbomachine manufacturing of the future

16.11.2016 | Event News

Innovation Day Laser Technology – Laser Additive Manufacturing

01.11.2016 | Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

 
Latest News

UTSA study describes new minimally invasive device to treat cancer and other illnesses

02.12.2016 | Medical Engineering

Plasma-zapping process could yield trans fat-free soybean oil product

02.12.2016 | Agricultural and Forestry Science

What do Netflix, Google and planetary systems have in common?

02.12.2016 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>