Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Worm-tracking challenge leads to new tool for brain research

04.10.2011
University of Oregon neuroscientists team with scientific-imaging company to catch worm neurons in action

Using new optical equipment, a team of 11 researchers put roundworms into a world of virtual reality, monitored both their behavior and brain activity and gained unexpected information on how the organism's brain operates as it moves.

The new research tracking system -- created in collaboration with Eugene-based Applied Scientific Instrumentation Inc. (ASI) -- should help neuroscientists around the world who use other small organisms, such as fruit flies and zebra fish, in their studies to understand how the central nervous system is tied to behavior, said Shawn R. Lockery, professor of biology and director of the Institute of Neuroscience at the University of Oregon.

In a paper in the online journal PLoS ONE, a publication of the Public Library of Science, researchers detail how the dual camera tool works and how they used it in experiments with freely moving roundworms (Caenorhabditis elegans).

The research team, led by Serge Faumont, a senior research associate in the Institute of Neuroscience, found that certain neurons remain active as roundworms move forward and backward. Researchers had theorized that some neurons would be active when moving forward and then shut down as another set of neurons engaged when the animal reversed.

This basic-level research provides a window in which scientists can explore links between the brain and behavior, how neuronal activity might be organized and how genetic mutations may affect connections more broadly, such as in mental illness in humans, Faumont and Lockery said.

"We want to understand the physical basis of thinking, in particular of consciousness," Lockery said. "But we don't have access to another person's or animal's thoughts directly. The only access we have is through behavior."

The roundworm-human connection is genetically strong, Faumont noted. "Sixty percent of the genome of C-elegans is conserved in humans," he said. "You can knock out a gene in a worm, and know that that gene has a human version."

"Studies like this, with this nematode, which has only 302 neurons and about 5,000 synapses," Lockery said, "are important because biologists have repeatedly discovered that evolution is conservative -- that there are very strong relationships in terms of molecules and mechanisms, including those in the brain, between simple organisms and humans."

Using simple organisms, he said, allows researchers to potentially gain a complete understanding of a brain, "whereas we may never fully understand the human brain." Gaining insights on where modularity exists -- and where it breaks down -- provides fundamental insights that can guide researchers studying the brains of more complicated animals, Lockery said.

The device allowed roundworms, specially bred with neurons containing fluorescence, to move about freely and naturally on a specially lubricated platform in an environment watched over by cameras that keep the animals centered -- and all of their brain activity and movements recordable. That is the magic of the system, Lockery said. Keeping the target sites fully centered and constantly observable to catch all complexities had been a barrier, Faumont said.

"Imagine looking at a squirrel with a pair of powerful binoculars, and all you can see is an eye," Faumont said. "You are trying to keep the eye of the squirrel centered while the squirrel is doing an activity and jumping around. This represents a complex tracking problem."

The sensitive microscopy device created by Lockery's lab and ASI keeps the roundworms' fluorescently lit neurons centered in a constant field-of-view and monitored as they move about at speeds of up to 500 microns, or about one-half millimeter a second. Two specialty cameras -- based on ASI's Phototrack system -- provide for synchronized viewing and recording that captures simultaneously neuronal activity and behavior.

In the team's virtual reality experiment, roundworms were placed in an environment in which a blue laser would trigger an avoidance response in neurons known to react to a perceived toxin, by recoiling or reversing to avoid danger. In the absence of the blue light, animals moved freely. "This experiment provides proof-of-concept for creating high-resolution virtual environments for exploring the neuronal control of behavior in freely crawling organisms," the team wrote.

Lockery approached ASI, which was founded in 1990, about the tracking challenge during an international neuroscience meeting in 2006. The ensuing collaboration resulted in a highly sensitive tracking system that ASI owns and that Lockery's lab gets to use and help improve. The company manufactures electro-mechanical devices that are used around the world by cell biologists, neuroscientists, pharmaceutical companies and material scientists.

Neither Lockery nor the University of Oregon holds a financial interest in the device. "This has been a perfect collaboration between industry and academic research," Lockery said. Such collaborations, said study co-author Gary Rondeau, ASI's technical director, help to keep ASI on the cutting edge for new product development.

"We are frequently asked to look at new special applications," Rondeau said. "This keeps the work fresh and aimed at the constantly changing needs of our customers in the research community. Some projects, like this one, are just fun. It's nice to use our talents to develop new ways to achieve scientific goals that haven't been possible before. Talking over details of experiments with creative researchers such as Shawn and Serge is always stimulating, and then seeing things come together is very satisfying."

The National Institutes of Health supported the research.

The nine co-authors with Faumont and Lockery were: Gary Rondeau, ASI technical director; UO doctoral students Tod R. Thiele and Kathryn E. McCormick; UO undergraduate Kristy J. Lawton (now a graduate student at Cornell University); Matthew Sottile of Galois Inc., in Portland, Ore.; Oliver Griesbeck of Max-Planck Institute of Neurobiology in Martinsried, Germany; Ellie S. Heckscher and Chris Q. Doe, Howard Hughes Medical Institute-supported researchers at the UO; and William M. Roberts, professor of biology and member of the Institute of Neuroscience.

About the University of Oregon:

The University of Oregon is among the 108 institutions chosen from 4,633 U.S. universities for top-tier designation of "Very High Research Activity" in the 2010 Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education. The UO also is one of two Pacific Northwest members of the Association of American Universities.

Sources: Shawn Lockery, professor of biology, director of the Institute of Neuroscience, 541-346-4590, shawn@uoregon.edu, and Serge Faumont, senior research associate, Institute of Neuroscience, 541- 346-4592, serge@uoregon.edu

Audio Clip: Shawn Lockery on value of this kind of research: http://comm.uoregon.edu/files/pmr/uploads/TheseStudies.mp3

Web Links:

Lockery faculty page: http://www.neuro.uoregon.edu/ionmain/htdocs/faculty/lockery.html

Lockery Lab: http://chinook.uoregon.edu/index.html

Institute of Neuroscience: http://www.neuro.uoregon.edu/

Biology Department: http://biology.uoregon.edu/

Applied Scientific Instrumentation: http://www.asiimaging.com/

Follow UO Science on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/UniversityOfOregonScience

Jim Barlow | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.uoregon.edu

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Cryo-electron microscopy achieves unprecedented resolution using new computational methods
24.03.2017 | DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

nachricht How cheetahs stay fit and healthy
24.03.2017 | Forschungsverbund Berlin e.V.

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

Im Focus: Researchers Imitate Molecular Crowding in Cells

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to simulate these confined natural conditions in artificial vesicles for the first time. As reported in the academic journal Small, the results are offering better insight into the development of nanoreactors and artificial organelles.

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Argon is not the 'dope' for metallic hydrogen

24.03.2017 | Materials Sciences

Astronomers find unexpected, dust-obscured star formation in distant galaxy

24.03.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Gravitational wave kicks monster black hole out of galactic core

24.03.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>