Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Vaccine made with synthetic gene protects against deadly pneumonia

22.02.2011
Triggers protective immune response while preventing fatal inflammation

Researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University have developed an experimental vaccine that appears to protect against an increasingly common and particularly deadly form of pneumococcal pneumonia. Details of the new vaccine, which was tested in an animal model, are reported in a paper published today in the Journal of Infectious Diseases.

Pneumococcal pneumonia can occur when the lungs are infected with the bacterial species Streptococcus pneumoniae (also known as pneumococcus). "Like many microbes that cause pneumonia, pneumococcus is spread from person to person through coughing or sneezing," said principal investigator Liise-anne Pirofski, M.D., professor of medicine and of microbiology & immunology and the Selma and Dr. Jacques Mitrani Chair in Biomedical Research. Symptoms include cough, fever, shortness of breath, and chest pain.

The National Foundation for Infectious Diseases estimates that 175,000 people are hospitalized with pneumococcal pneumonia in the United States each year. In addition to pneumonia, pneumococcus causes 34,500 bloodstream infections and 2,200 cases of meningitis annually. It is responsible for more deaths in the United States – 4,800 a year – than any other vaccine-preventable disease. It poses a particular problem in the developing world, where it is estimated to cause more than one million deaths in children each year, according to the World Health Organization.

A pediatric vaccine has dramatically reduced the incidence of pneumococcal disease in children and adults, both by protecting vaccinated children and by reducing person-to-person transmission of the bacterium to others – a phenomenon known as herd immunity.

"The pediatric vaccine is a great victory for modern medicine, but it doesn't cover all strains of disease-causing pneumococcus – some of which have recently emerged and are very virulent," said Dr. Pirofski. "This problem, coupled with the fact that herd immunity doesn't protect immunocompromised patients as effectively as people with normal immunity, led us to look for a better vaccine."

The researchers focused on developing a vaccine against serotype 3 – a pneumococcal strain that was not included in the pediatric vaccine used for the past decade and that has emerged as a cause of serious pneumonia in adults and children. Serotype 3 can trigger inflammation so overwhelming that it can result in very severe disease or even death.

The goal of this study was to produce a vaccine consisting of a live, attenuated (weakened) version of serotype 3 S. pneumoniae. To create their vaccine, the researchers focused on the serotype 3 gene that codes for pneumolysin, a toxin produced by all pneumococcal strains. The researchers replaced this gene with a synthetic version that they hoped would reduce the amount of toxin produced.

"Our idea was to design a live vaccine that would stimulate the immune system sufficiently to ward off disease but wouldn't lead to the severely damaging inflammatory response that this strain can cause," said lead author J. Robert Coleman, Ph.D., a postdoctoral fellow in microbiology & immunology at Einstein, who helped develop the gene-modification technique, known as synthetic gene customization, while a graduate student at Stony Brook University.

"The novelty of this approach lies in the fact that the gene's expression would be reduced, but not eliminated," Dr. Coleman added. "Previous approaches to genetic regulation of virulence relied on knocking out genes, which eliminates their expression completely."

Altering the pneumolysin gene in the seroptype 3 bacteria resulted in less pneumolysin toxin produced in vitro. When mice were injected with either attenuated or unattenuated serotype 3 bacteria, mice receiving the attenuated strain developed an inflammatory response much weaker than was observed in mice receiving the unattenuated serotype 3 strain. Most important, of the five mice injected with the attenuated strain, four survived a subsequent challenge from the highly virulent unattenuated serotype 3 strain, which was lethal in five of five unvaccinated, control mice.

This method of reducing gene expression had been used for viral pathogens, but this is the first time that gene customization has successfully controlled virulence in bacteria. The study's findings could potentially lead to pneumococcal vaccines based on weakened strains, and the Einstein researchers are now investigating whether they can reduce the expression of other genes associated with pneumococcal virulence.

The paper, "Designed reduction of Streptococcus pneumoniae pathogenicity via synthetic changes in virulence factor codon-pair bias," was published in the February 22 online edition of the Journal of Infectious Diseases. Co-authors include Masahide Yano at Einstein; Dimitris Papamichail at the University of Miami, Miami; and María del Mar García-Suárez, at Biozell Diagnostico Molecular SL, Asturias, Spain.

This research was funded by the National Institutes of Health and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.

About Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University

Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University is one of the nation's premier centers for research, medical education and clinical investigation. During the 2009-2010 academic year, Einstein is home to 722 M.D. students, 243 Ph.D. students, 128 students in the combined M.D./Ph.D. program, and approximately 350 postdoctoral research fellows. The College of Medicine has 2,775 fulltime faculty members located on the main campus and at its clinical affiliates. In 2009, Einstein received more than $155 million in support from the NIH. This includes the funding of major research centers at Einstein in diabetes, cancer, liver disease, and AIDS. Other areas where the College of Medicine is concentrating its efforts include developmental brain research, neuroscience, cardiac disease, and initiatives to reduce and eliminate ethnic and racial health disparities. Through its extensive affiliation network involving five medical centers in the Bronx, Manhattan and Long Island - which includes Montefiore Medical Center, The University Hospital and Academic Medical Center for Einstein - the College of Medicine runs one of the largest post-graduate medical training programs in the United States, offering approximately 150 residency programs to more than 2,500 physicians in training. For more information, please visit www.einstein.yu.edu

Kim Newman | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.einstein.yu.edu

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Multi-institutional collaboration uncovers how molecular machines assemble
02.12.2016 | Salk Institute

nachricht Fertilized egg cells trigger and monitor loss of sperm’s epigenetic memory
02.12.2016 | IMBA - Institut für Molekulare Biotechnologie der Österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften GmbH

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Novel silicon etching technique crafts 3-D gradient refractive index micro-optics

A multi-institutional research collaboration has created a novel approach for fabricating three-dimensional micro-optics through the shape-defined formation of porous silicon (PSi), with broad impacts in integrated optoelectronics, imaging, and photovoltaics.

Working with colleagues at Stanford and The Dow Chemical Company, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign fabricated 3-D birefringent...

Im Focus: Quantum Particles Form Droplets

In experiments with magnetic atoms conducted at extremely low temperatures, scientists have demonstrated a unique phase of matter: The atoms form a new type of quantum liquid or quantum droplet state. These so called quantum droplets may preserve their form in absence of external confinement because of quantum effects. The joint team of experimental physicists from Innsbruck and theoretical physicists from Hannover report on their findings in the journal Physical Review X.

“Our Quantum droplets are in the gas phase but they still drop like a rock,” explains experimental physicist Francesca Ferlaino when talking about the...

Im Focus: MADMAX: Max Planck Institute for Physics takes up axion research

The Max Planck Institute for Physics (MPP) is opening up a new research field. A workshop from November 21 - 22, 2016 will mark the start of activities for an innovative axion experiment. Axions are still only purely hypothetical particles. Their detection could solve two fundamental problems in particle physics: What dark matter consists of and why it has not yet been possible to directly observe a CP violation for the strong interaction.

The “MADMAX” project is the MPP’s commitment to axion research. Axions are so far only a theoretical prediction and are difficult to detect: on the one hand,...

Im Focus: Molecules change shape when wet

Broadband rotational spectroscopy unravels structural reshaping of isolated molecules in the gas phase to accommodate water

In two recent publications in the Journal of Chemical Physics and in the Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters, researchers around Melanie Schnell from the Max...

Im Focus: Fraunhofer ISE Develops Highly Compact, High Frequency DC/DC Converter for Aviation

The efficiency of power electronic systems is not solely dependent on electrical efficiency but also on weight, for example, in mobile systems. When the weight of relevant components and devices in airplanes, for instance, is reduced, fuel savings can be achieved and correspondingly greenhouse gas emissions decreased. New materials and components based on gallium nitride (GaN) can help to reduce weight and increase the efficiency. With these new materials, power electronic switches can be operated at higher switching frequency, resulting in higher power density and lower material costs.

Researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE together with partners have investigated how these materials can be used to make power...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ICTM Conference 2017: Production technology for turbomachine manufacturing of the future

16.11.2016 | Event News

Innovation Day Laser Technology – Laser Additive Manufacturing

01.11.2016 | Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

 
Latest News

UTSA study describes new minimally invasive device to treat cancer and other illnesses

02.12.2016 | Medical Engineering

Plasma-zapping process could yield trans fat-free soybean oil product

02.12.2016 | Agricultural and Forestry Science

What do Netflix, Google and planetary systems have in common?

02.12.2016 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>